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Full text of "The Labour gazette, January-December 1963"

HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO PRESS 



Covemmei 
Publicatioj 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

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Published Monthly by the 

DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



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CANADA 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Send remittance by cheque or post office money order, payable to the Receiver-General of 
Canada, to The Queen's Printer, % Superintendent of Government Publications, Ottawa. 
All subscriptions payable in advance. 

Annual Report of the Department of Labour (Covers fiscal year ending Catalogue No. 
March 31). (English or French). Price 25 cents. Ll-1961 

REPRINTS FROM THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

10 cents a copy except where otherwise indicated. 
Orders of 20 or more, 5 cents; 100 or more, 4 cents. 

Industrial and Geographic Distribution of Union Membership in Canada, 

1961 (English or French) L32-762 

Human Rights in Canada (English or French). Price 25 cents. L33-1058 

ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 

Labour Organizations in Canada (annual). Contains a brief commentary, the 
latest statistical data on union membership, and a directory of labour 
organizations with names of their principal officers, publications, and the 
geographic distribution of their local branches in Canada. (English or 
French). Price 35 cents. L2-2/1962 

Strikes and Lockouts in Canada (annual). Furnishes a record of strikes and 
lockouts occurring in Canada during a year. Tables and related texts 
showing strikes and lockouts by years, by areas, by industries, including 
time lost, number of workers involved, duration, etc. 

Price 35 cents. L2-159 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour. An annual report published in 
loose-leaf form and followed later by a paper-bound volume. Contains the 
results of an annual survey at October 1 of occupational wage rates and 
standard hours of work in most industries. Averages and predominant 
ranges of wage rates for selected occupations are tabulated separately 
on a regional basis for some 90 industries including logging, mining, 
manufacturing, construction, transportation, trade and service groups. 
Weekly salaries for office occupations and hourly wage rates for main- 
tenance and service occupations and for labourer for several broad 
industry groups are shown, on a community basis, in 52 communities. 
Trends in wage rates are indicated in tables of index numbers by 
industry. (Bilingual). L2-544 

First year service including attractive binder with index tabs 
and paper-bound volume, $7.50; service without indexed binder, 
$5.00; individual tables, 10 cents. Paper-bound volume, $1.00. 

Group Hospitalization and Medical Insurance Plans in Canadian Manu- 
facturing Industries (English or French). Price 25 cents. L36-558 
Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1961. L2-1561 

Labour Management Research Series 

1. Provisions for Income Security in Canadian Manufacturing Industries. L2-22/1 

2. Shiftwork and Shift Differentials in Canadian Manufacturing Industries. L2-22/2 

3. Sickness and Accident Provisions in Canadian Industry. L2-22/3 

Price 25 cents. 

Professional Manpower Bulletins 

1. Trends in Professional Manpower Supplies and Requirements (out of 

print) L2-2001 

2. Immigrants in Scientific and Technical Professions in Canada. L2-2002 

3. Canadians Studying in the United States for Degrees in Science, 
Engineering, Agriculture, Architecture and Veterinary Medicine, 1955-56. L2-2003 

4. Recent Changes in Engineering Manpower Requirements and Supplies in 

Canada. L2-2004 

5. Employment Outlook for Professional Personnel in Scientific and Tech- 
nical Fields, 1958-1960 (superseded by Bulletin No. 8) L2-2005 

•6. The Early Post-Graduate Years in the Technical and Scientific Professions 

in Canada. L2-2006 

(Continued on page three of cover) 







THE 

LABOUR 
GAZETTE 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 

INDEX 

VOLUME LXm 

FOR THE YEAR 

1963 



Minister— Hon. Allan J. MacEachen 
Deputy Minister— George V. Haythorne Editor— William S. Drinkwater 



ROGER DUHAMEL, F.R.S.C. 
QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 
OTTAWA, 1964 
91182—1 



PAGE NUMBERS OF MONTHLY EDITIONS 

Month 

1- 104 January 

106- 188 February 

190- 272 March 

274- 356 April 

358- 452 , May 

454- 544 J une 

546- 652 J ul V 

654- 768 August 

770- 860 September 

862- 956 October 

958-1064 November 

1066-1164 December 



ERRATA 

On page 728 — Column 1 — para. 1 — Line 5 — for 5 read 45. 
On page 807 — Column 1 — para. 5 — Line 12 — for 5 cents read 15 cents. 



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97 686 



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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



CB 

CBRT 

CCC 

CLC 

CMA 

CNR 

CNTU 

CO 

CSAC 

CUPE 

DBS 

IAPA 

IAPES 

ILO 

NES 

NPC 

NUPE 

NUPSE 

OECD 

OFL 

SIU 

TUC 

UN 

USWA 



Conciliation Board. 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers. 
Canadian Chamber of Commerce. 
Canadian Labour Congress. 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 
Canadian National Railways. 
Confederation of National Trade Unions. 
Conciliation Officer. 
Civil Service Association of Canada. 
Canadian Union of Public Employees. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 
Industrial Accident Prevention Associations. 
International Association of Personnel in Employment Security. 
International Labour Organization. 
National Employment Service. 
National Productivity Council. 
National Union of Public Employees. 
National Union of Public Service Employees. 
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. 
Ontario Federation of Labour. 
Seafarers' International Union. 
Trades Union Congress 
United Nations 
• United Steelworkers of America. 



91182—2 



INDEX 



Accident Prevention See also Safety, Industrial 

Accident Prevention and Compensation Branch 
(federal Department of Labour) report 
(1961-62), 194; (1962-63), 654. 

Accidents, Industrial See also Workmen's Com- 
pensation 

Industrial fatalities. CANADA: (1962), 371. 
first and second quarters (1963), 596, 884. 
third and fourth quarters (1962), 33, 286. 

Statistics: "H-Industrial Accidents" (quarterly 
and annual feature). 

Steelworkers policy conference, views re IAPA, 
549. 

Advisory Committee on professional Manpower 
Meeting, OECD review team. CANADA: 865. 

Aero Caterers Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters) : 693; 
representation vote, 798; granted, 897. 

Aerospace 

Ratio, hourly production workers and technicians 
to engineers and scientists, in aircraft plant's 
change to aerospace operation. UNITED 
STATES: 548. 

Africa 

Economic Commission for Africa, research on 
role of women in urban development ( 1071. 

Aging See Older Workers 
Agriculture, Department of 

Co-operation in Canada, 1961, 7. 

Credit Unions in Canada, 1961, 7; in 1962, 963. 

Ainsborough, Francis J., Chief Conciliator, 
Federal Department of Labour 
Retirement, 360. 

Air Line Flight Attendants' Association, 
Canadian 
Certification application: 

TransAir Limited: granted, 47. 
Disputes: 
Pacific Western Airlines Limited: C.B. report, 
229; strike action after C.B. procedure, 311; 
settlement, 899. 
TransAir Limited: CO. appointed, 1016. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Pacific Western Airlines Limited: rejected, 
1109. 

Air Line Pilots Association, Canadian 
Disputes : 
Pacific Western Airlines Limited: settlement, 

145. 
TransAir Limited: CO. appointed, 227; 
settlement, 310. 

Airlines Traffic Employees Association, 
Pacific Western 

Dispute: 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited: C.B. report, 
227; strike action after C.B. procedure, 311; 
settlement, 899. 
91182— 2\ 



Alaska Cruise Lines, Limited 

Dispute (Seafarers): CO. appointed, 144; settle- 
ment, 396. 

Alberta Wheat Pool 

Dispute (Brewery Workers) : CO. appointed, 
49; settlement, 227. 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 

Company 
Certification application (locomotive engineers) 

(Locomotive Engineers): 1110. 
Certification application (locomotive firemen 

and helpers) (Locomotive Engineers): 1110. 
Dispute (Railroad Trainmen) : C.B. appointed, 

145; C.B. fully constituted, 145; C.B. report, 

604; settlement, 603. 

Annuities 

Government Annuities Act, administration. 
CANADA: 546. 
Apprenticeship 

Alta. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 713, 820, 
1125. 

Alta. Supreme Court rules University not subject 
to parts of Labour Act dealing with certifica- 
tion, 818. 

B.C. Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act: amendments, 970; regulation, 404. 

Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Conference 
on Manpower Development and Training, 965. 

Man. Apprenticeship Act: amendment, 971; 
regulations, 321. 

National Apprenticeship Training Advisory Com- 
mittee, 20th anniversary, 361; re, 190. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, meeting, 6th, 1076. 

Nfld. Apprenticeship Act: designated trades,. 
151; orders, 614; regulations, 822. 

Ont. Apprenticeship Act: amendments, 97 1, 
1026; regulations, 822. 

P.E.I. Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act: enactment, provisions, 970. 

P.E.I, signs federal-provincial Apprenticeship 
Training Agreement, 5. 

Sask. Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act: amendment, 524; regulations, 822, 
1126. 
Arbitration 

B.C. Supreme Court quashes arbitration award 
under a collective agreement on ground of 
error on face of the award, 315. 

Compulsory arbitration, U.S. rail dispute, 773. 

Diesel firemen, elimination of jobs supported by 
federal board. UNITED STATES: 1070. 

Ontario Court of Appeal restores arbitration 
award in which the board declined jurisdiction 
to hear union's grievance, 312; rules arbitra- 
tors under collective agreement constitute 
statutory board, decisions reviewable, 59. 

Pan American World Airways — Brotherhood 
of Railway and Steamship Clerks' agreement 
provides final and binding arbitration in any 
dispute if U.S. Railway Labor Act fails, 657. 
Archer, David, President, Ontario Federation of 
Labour 

Educational Conference, OFL, remarks, 278. 



VI 



INDEX 



Armstrong, Eric (et al) 

Application for revocation of certification (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers): 
granted, 142; 143. 

Arnaud Railway 
Certification application (Pickands Mather and 
Company) ( Steel workers ) : 799; withdrawn, 
898. 
Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc. 

Certification application (Teamsters): 799; 
representation vote, 897; granted, 1014. 

Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc. 

Certification application (Wilson, Peter J., inter- 
vener) : representation vote, 897. 

Associated Enterprises Limited 

Certification application (Retail, Wholesale and 
Department Store): 309; granted, 389. 

Association of Employees of Grimshaw Truck- 
ing 
Certification of application: 

Grimshaw Trucking and Distribution Limited: 
694; granted, 897. 

Atomic Energy Allied Council 
Dispute: 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited: CO. 
appointed, 505; settlement, 603. 

Atomic Energy Control Act 

Regulation (Shipping Containers Order), 320. 
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Certification application (Office Employees) : 

309; granted, 502. 
Dispute (Atomic Energy Allied Council) : CO. 

appointed, 505; settlement, 603. 
Dispute (CLC): CO. appointed, 1115. 
Dispute (Office Employees): CO. appointed, 

800; settlement, 1016. 

Automation 

A Second Survey of Electronic Data Processing 
in Canada, 1962, federal Department of 
Labour, 867. 

Advisory Committee on Technological Change, 
190. 

Automation and technological change, Railway 
Brotherhoods, views, 20. 

Automation and the Older Worker — U.S. Na- 
tional Council on the Aging, 138. 

Automation and unemployment, U.S. President's 
Council of Economic Advisers, 1070. 

"Automation Protection Plan", agreement, 
International Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union and Shipping Federation of 
British Columbia, 772. 

CLC, views, 14. 

CNTU, views, 17. 

Conference on Automation and Social Change. 
ONTARIO; 868. 

Effects of automation and technological change, 
report to National Productivity Council by J. 
P. Francis, Director, Economics and Research 
Branch, federal Department of Labour, 362. 



"Fallacies and Facts About Automation", Victor 
R. Fuchs, U.S. National Bureau of Economic 
Research, 362. 

Foundation on automation, plans for establish- 
ment. ONTARIO; 868. 

Manpower Implications of Technological 
Change — Session 1, Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, McGill University, 461. 

National Advisory Committee on Technological 
Education, meeting, 3rd, 1077. 

Ratio, hourly production workers and technicians 
to engineers and scientists, aircraft plant, 
drop. UNITED STATES: 548. 

"The Challenge of Automation", address, Rev. 
Dennis J. Comey, to Georgetown University's 
Conference on Social Ethics and Automation. 
UNITED STATES: 284. 

The Impact of Technological Change: The 
American Experience. UNITED STATES: 
1069. 

Transition from mechanization to automation, 
address, President, Honeywell Controls 
Limited, Toronto, 555. 

Union problems adjusting to technological 
change — Director of Research, Industrial Rela- 
tions Counsellors, Inc., N.Y., 277. 

Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Im- 
plement Workers of America, United 

Agreement, Sabo Machine and Tool Works, Inc., 
annual salary for plant workers (production 
and maintenance). UNITED STATES: 7. 

Certification application: 

Compagnie Nationale Air France: 47; repre- 
sentation vote, 142; granted, 225. 

Dispute: 
Compagnie Nationale Air France: 47; repre- 
appointed, 800; settlement, 1115. 

Avery, Walter S. T. (et al) 

Intervener, certification application: 

Bushnell TV Company Limited: representation 
vote, 692. 



B 



Bachmeier Diamond and Percussion Drilling 
Company Limited 
Certification application (Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers): 799; granted, 897. 

Balcer, Hon. Leon, Federal Minister of Transport 
CNTU brief, reply, 18. 

Baton Broadcasting Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees 
and Technicians, intervener) : request for 
review, 694; granted, 798. 
Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : request for review, 694; granted 
798. 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada 

Certification application (Office Employees): 
898; granted, 1109; reasons for judgment, 
1113. 

Ont. High Court rules Company subsidiary is 
not subject to federal labour legislation, 1120. 
Bennett and White 

Dispute (Carpenters) : CO. appointed, 602 
settlement, 603. 



INDEX 



VII 



Blindness Allowances 

Statistics. CANADA: 195, 459, 774, 963. 

Boilers 

Man. Steam and Pressure Plants Act: amend- 
ments, 1088. 

N.B. Stationary Engineers Act: amendment, 
1088. 

Ont. Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act: revised 
regulations, 1084. 

Boyles Bros. Drilling (Alberta) Limited 
Dispute (Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers): CO. 
appointed, 694. 

Bray, John L. 

Certification application (Teamsters) : 1016; 
representation vote, 1109. 

Brewery Workers See United Brewery, Flour, 
Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers 
of America, International Union of 

B.C. Air Lines Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers): 693; granted, 798. 

B.C. Hydro and Power Authority 

Income continuance plan between Street Rail- 
waymen and Company, 311. 

British Yukon Navigation Company Limited 
Dispute (Merchant Service): CO. appointed, 

694; settlement, 694. 
Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 

Workers): CO. appointed, 602; settlement, 

694. 

Broadcast Employees and Technicians, Na- 
tional Association of 
Applications for revocation of certification: 

Buteau, Germaine (et al): 143; rejected, 389; 
reasons for judgment, 391. 

CJMS Radio Montreal Limited: 143; rejected, 
389; reasons for judgment, 391. 

Jarraud, Lucien (et al) : 143; rejected, 389; 
reasons for judgment, 391. 

Twin City Broadcasting Company Limited: 
390; granted, 502. 
Certification applications: 

Bushnell TV Company Limited: 504; repre- 
sentation vote, 692; rejected, 798. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (country- 
wide building maintenance group) : 897; 
representation vote, 1014; granted, 1109. 

Canadian Marconi Company Limited: request 
for review, 799; 897. 

CKCV (Quebec) Limited: request for review 
of decision: received, 504; granted, 502. 

Maple Leaf Broadcasting Company Limited: 
1109. 

Niagara Television Limited: 601. 

V.T.R. Productions Limited: 693; granted, 
798. 
Disputes: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: CO. 
appointed, 602; CB. appointed, 800; CB. 
fully constituted, 899. 

CKOV Limited: CO. appointed, 602; settle- 
ment, 694. 



Niagara Television Limited: CO. appointed, 
227; settlement, 227. 

Radio Station CHRC Limitee: CO. appoint- 
ed, 1016. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Baton Broadcasting Limited: request for 
review, 694; granted, 798. 

Brocklesby, John N. Transport Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters) : settlement, 227. 
Brown and Ryan Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654): CO. 

appointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; CB. 

fully constituted, 397; CB. report, settlement, 

808. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1842): CO. 

appointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; CB. fully 

constituted, 396; CB. report, settlement, 805. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1869): CO. 

appointed, 1115. 

Bruce, John W., O.B.E. 

General organizer, Canada, for United Associa- 
tion of Journeymen and Apprentices of the 
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the 
U.S. and Canada, retirement, 196. 

Building and Construction See Construction 

Industry 
Building Service Employees' International 

Union 

Disputes: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: CO. 
appointed, 602. 

Capital Window Cleaners Limited: CO. 
appointed, 144; settlement, 603. 

Northern Cleaning Agencies Inc.: CO. ap- 
pointed, 396; settlement, 396. 

Burrard Terminals Limited 

Dispute (Brewery Workers): CO. appointed, 49; 
settlement, 227. 

Bushnell TV Company Limited 

Certification application (Avery, Walter ST., 

(et al), interveners): representation vote, 692. 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 

504; representation vote, 692; rejected, 798. 

Business and Professional Women See Women 
in Industry 

Buteau, Germaine (et al) 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
application for revocation, 143; rejected, 389; 
reasons for judgment, 391. 



Canada Labour Relations Board 

Certifies bargaining agent for 19,900 CNR 
clerks, 144. 
Canadian Association of Administrators of 
Labour Legislation 
Conference, 22nd, 917. 

Wilson, W. Elliott, Q.C., honorary president, 864. 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Certification application (country-wide building 
maintenance group) (Broadcast Employees): 
897; representation vote, 1014; granted, 1109. 



vm 



INDEX 



Certification application (Radio and Television 
Employees, intervener): representation vote, 
1014; granted, 1109. 

Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. appointed, 
602; C.B. appointed, 800; C.B. fully consti- 
tuted, 899. 

Dispute (Building Service Employees): CO. 
appointed, 602. 

Dispute (Radio and Television Employees) : CO. 
appointed, 1016. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
Active economy (1963) predicted by President, 

4. 
Brief, federal Government, 21. 
Pre-budget brief, federal Government, 111. 
Meeting, 34th, 988. 

Canadian Construction Association 

Education, importance stressed, Thomas A. 

Somerville, President, 963. 
Meeting, 45th, 211. 
$7.5 billion construction program predicted 

(1963), CCA President, 5. 
Winter construction profitable, 1068. 

Canadian Education Association 

More federal aid for vocational schools urged, 
Standing Committee of Ministers of Educa- 
tion, 969. 

Canadian Labour College See Labour College 
of Canada 

Canadian Labour Congress 

Brief, federal Cabinet, 13. 

CUPE— merger NUPSE and NUPE, 866. 

Dispute (Local 1569) (Atomic Energy of 
Canada Limited): CO. appointed, 1115. 

Dodge, William, Vice-President: remarks, Na- 
tional Productivity Council labour-manage- 
ment seminar, 457. 

Hepworth, A. L., Assistant Director, Legislative 
and Government Employees Department, 
appointment, 961. 

Jenoves, William, General Vice-President, 60 
years trade unionist, 773. 

Jodoin, Claude, President: Labour Day message, 
659; New Year message, 1073; remarks — 
CMA Plenary Conference on Economic 
Growth, 588, Quebec Federation of Labour, 
31. 

Labour Unions: An Introductory Course for In- 
dividuals and Study Groups, labour education 
program, 1143. 

Morris, Joe, Executive Vice-President: remarks, 
Quebec Federation of Labour, 31. 

Ontario NUPE convention approves merger with 
NUPSE, 458. 

Shoe Workers of America, United — affiliation, 
961. 

Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
Meeting, 92nd, 577. 

Pollock, Carl A., President — address, National 
Conference of Producers and Consumers, 283. 
Canadian Marconi Company Limited 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 

request for review, 799; 897. 
Certification application (Television and Radio 
Artists, intervener): request for review, 897. 



Canadian Maritime Union 

Certification application : 

Lakeland Tankers Limited: 693; withdrawn, 
694. 

Dispute: 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Great 
Lakes Steamships Service) : CO. appointed, 
505; settlement, 800. 
Canadian National Hotels, Limited 

Dispute (Bessborough Hotel, Saskatoon) (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers) : CO. 
appointed, 49; settlement, 310. 

Dispute (Charlottetown Hotel, Charlottetown) 
(Railway, Transport and General Workers) : 
CO. appointed, 49; C.B. appointed, 505; C.B. 
fully constituted, 603; settlement, 800. 

Dispute (Chateau Laurier Hotel, Ottawa) (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers); C.B. 
appointed, 49; C.B. fully constituted, 145; 
r ettlement, 311. 

Dispute (Newfoundland Hotel, St. John's) 
(Hotel and Restaurant Employees) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 144; settlement, 311. 

Dispute (Nova Scotia Hotel, Halifax) (Hotel 
and Restaurant Employees) : CO. appointed, 
505; settlement, 694. 
Canadian National Railways 

CLRB cerifies bargaining agent for 19,900 CNR 
clerks, 144. 

Certification application (clerical and manual 
classifications) (Longshoremen, intervener) : 
granted, 142. 

Certification application (clerical and manual 
classifications) (Maintenance-of-Way Em- 
ployees, intervener) : granted, 142. 

Certification application (clerical and manual 
classifications) (Railroad Telegraphers, inter- 
vener) : granted, 142; request for review of 
decision, 390; denied, 503. 

Certification application (clerical and manual 
classifications) (Railway, Transport and Gen- 
eral Workers) : granted, 142; request for re- 
view of decision, 390; denied, 503. 

Certification application (Commercial Teleg- 
raphers) : 225; withdrawn, 226; 694; granted, 
897; request for review granted, 1014; request 
for review received, 1016. 

Certification application (Telecommunications 
Department) (Railroad Telegraphers): 601. 

Certification application (unit of various system 
employees in Canada except Newfoundland) 
(Railroad Telegraphers): 601. 

Certification application (unit of employees 
in Newfoundland) (Railroad Telegraphers): 
601. 

Certification application (unit of employees in 
Newfoundland) (Railway and Steamship 
Clerks): 693. 
Canadian National Steamshd? Company Limited 

Dispute (Seafarers) : CO. appointed, 800; settle- 
ment, 899. 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited 

Dispute (Hotel and Restaurant Employees): 
settlement, 49. 

Dispute (Teamsters): CO. appointed, 505; set- 
tlement, 603. 



INDEX 



IX 



Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

Certification application (Bay of Fundy Service) 
(Railway, Transport and General Workers): 
request for review of decision, 504; granted, 
692. 

Certification application (unit of various system 
employees in Canada) (Railroad Teleg- 
raphers) : 601. 

Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks): 694. 

Dispute (Merchandise Services Department, 
Prairie Region) (Railway and Steamship 
Clerks): CO. appointed, 899; settlement, 
1016. 

Dispute (Seafarers) (S.S. Princess Helene) : 
settlement, 49. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Great 
Lakes Steamships Service) 
Dispute (Canadian Maritime Union) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 505; settlement, 800. 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 
Summary of decisions — Case Nos. 796-799, 51; 
800-801, 231; 802-804, 397; 805-806, 607; 807- 
811, 810; 812-815, 1115. 

Canadian Television and Radio Artists, Asso- 
ciation of 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Marconi Company Limited: request 
for review, 897. 

Canadian Transit Company 

Dispute (Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 49; C.B. 
appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 505; 
C.B. report, 801; settlement, 800. 

Canadian Transportation Workers' Union 
Intervener, certification application: 

Motorways (Ontario) Limited: granted, 225. 

Canadian Union of Public Employees 
Formation, 111, 866. 

Ontario NUPE convention' approves merger 
with NUPSE, 458. 

Canadian Workers' College 
First course, June 1964, 405. 

Capital Window Cleaners Limited 
Dispute (Building Service Employees): CO. 
appointed, 144; settlement, 603. 

Carpenters and Joiners of America, United 
Brotherhood of 
Dispute: 

918 Construction Company Limited; General 
Enterprises Limited; Dawson and Hall Con- 
struction Company; Bennett and White: 
CO. appointed, 602; settlement, 603. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 
Certification applications (Mine Workers): 
Belleville Terrace Project, 601; granted, 692. 
Cloverdale Park Project, Pierrefonds, Que., 

142; granted, 142. 
Domaine Estria, Pavilion Mercier and Place 

Gouin Projects, 1110. 
Domaine Estria and Pavilion Mercier Projects, 
Montreal, 898; withdrawn, 1016. 



Les Appartements Boulevard Pie IX, Ville St 

Michel, 601; granted, 692. 
Park Royal Housing Project, Ville Saint 

Laurent, 897; granted, 1014. 
Place Benoit Project, Ville Saint Laurent, 897; 

granted, 1014. 
St. George Gardens Project, 693; granted, 

798. 

Certification See also Industrial Relations 
Alta. Supreme Court . . . rules Board refusal 
to make evidence available by employer 
renders certification order invalid, 597; 
rules University not subject to parts of 
Labour Act dealing with certification, 818. 
Que. Court of Queen's Bench rules decision of 
Labour Relations Board in certification case 
cannot be challenged by writ, 609. 
Supreme Court of Canada rules Board may 
vary certification order by substituting suc- 
cessor union as bargaining agent, 146. 

Child Labour 
Alta. School Act: amendment, 1083. 

Civil Service Association of Canada See 
Eldorado Mining and Refining Group 

Civilian Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 

CJMS Radio Montreal 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
application for revocation, 143; rejected, 389; 
reasons for judgment, 391. 

CKCV (Quebec) Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
request for review of decision: received, 504; 
granted, 502. 

CKOV Limited 

Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. appointed, 
602; settlement, 694. 

Collective Bargaining See also Collective La- 
bour Agreements; Industrial Relations 

Collective Bargaining Review. CANADA: 
(monthly feature) 

CNTU views re Civil Service, 18. 

Dymond, W. R., Assistant Deputy Minister of 
Labour — paper presented to B.C. Conference 
on Industrial Relations role of collective 
bargaining research and statistics in in- 
dustrial relations, 666. 

Steelworkers policy conference, views, 549. 

Collective Labour Agreements 

"Automation Protection Plan", agreement, 
International Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union and Shipping Federation of 
British Columbia, 772. 

B.C. Supreme Court quashes arbitration award 
under a collective agreement on ground of 
error. on face of the award, 315. 

Kaiser Steel Corporation — Steelworkers agree- 
ment — sharing of savings in production costs, 
job security provisions, incentive pay. UNITED 
STATES: 6. 

National Incomes Commission report examines 
agreements affecting construction industry. 
BRITAIN: 550; 865. 



INDEX 



Ont. Court of Appeal rules arbitrators under 
collective agreement constitute statutory board, 
decisions reviewable, 59. 

Pan American World Airways — Brotherhood of 
Railway and Steamship Clerks' agreement pro- 
vides final and binding arbitration in any 
dispute if U.S. Railway Labor Act fails, 657. 

Sabo Machine and Tool Works, Inc. and Auto 
Workers, annual salary for plant workers 
(production and maintenance). UNITED 
STATES: 7. 

Survey, collective agreements, Canadian manu- 
facturing industry, 793. 

Commercial Telegraphers' Union 
Certification application: 

Canadian National Railways; 225; withdrawn, 
226; 694; granted, 897; request for review 
granted, 1014; request for review received, 
1016. 

COMPAGNIE NATIONALE AlR FRANCE 

Certification application (Auto Workers) : 47; 

representation vote, 142; granted, 225. 
Dispute (Auto Workers): CO. appointed, 800; 

settlement, 1115. 

Compulsory Arbitration See Arbitration 

Conciliation See also Industrial Relations; 
Legal Decisions 
Ainsborough, Francis J., chief conciliator, 
federal Department of Labour, retirement, 360. 

Confederation of National Trade Unions 

Brief, federal Cabinet, 16. 

Education director serves ILO in Central African 
Republic, 656. 

Larivee, Armand, Vice-President, appointment, 
773. 

Lessard, Daniel, Vice-President, and leader of 
1949 Asbestos strike, death of, 656. 

Marchand, Jean, General President: Labour Day 
message, 660, member federal Royal Com- 
mission on biculturalism, appointment, 657, 
New Year message, 1073. 

Regional directors appointed, 457. 
Consolidated Freightways 

Dispute (Office Employees) : CO. appointed, 
310; settlement, 695. 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company 
of Canada Limited 
Certification application (Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers): 601; granted, 798. 

Construction Industry 

Address, Dr. W. R. Dymond, Assistant federal 

Deputy Minister of Labour, Home Builders' 

Association of Greater Ottawa, 287. 
Building trades wage rates advance 1963. 

UNITED STATES: 505. 
Labour Relations Policy and the Building 

Trades in Canada — Session 111, Industrial 

Relations Conference, McGill University, 470. 
National Incomes Commission report examines 

agreements affecting construction industry. 

BRITAIN: 550; 865. 
Ont. Construction Hoists Act: regulations, 152. 



Ont. Construction Safety Act: amendments, 

1085. 
Ont. General Contractors Association, recom- 
mendations, training, 1079. 
$7.5 billion construction program predicted 

(1963), CCA President, 5. 
Winter construction profitable, CCA, 1068. 
Consumer Prices See Prices 
Co-operative Associations 

Co-operation in Canada, 1961, federal Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, 7. 

Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act 

CLC, views, 14. 
Cost of Living 

Prices and the Cost of Living. CANADA: 
(monthly feature) 

Statistics: "F-Prices" (monthly feature) 

Credit Unions 

Credit Unions in Canada, 1961, 7, and in 1962, 
963, federal Department of Agriculture. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited 

Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654) : CO. 

appointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted, 397; CB. report, settlement, 

808. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1842): CO. ap. 

pointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; CB. fully 

constituted, 396; CB. report, settlement, 805. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1869): CO. 

appointed, 1115. 



D 



Daley, Charles, Former Ontario Minister of La- 
bour 
Resignation as member of Ontario Legislature, 

457. 

Dawson and Hall Construction Company 
Dispute (Carpenters) : CO. appointed, 602; 
settlement, 603. 

De Luxe Transportation Limited 
Dispute (Teamsters) : settlement, 396. 

Denison Mines Limited 

Dispute (Steel workers) : CO. appointed, 899, 
1115; CB. appointed, 1115; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 1115. 

Desormeaux, Ernest C, Secretary, Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission 
Retirement, 5. 

Diefenbaker, Rt. Hon. John G., Prime Minister 
of Canada 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 20. 
Diesel Firemen 

Diesel firemen, elimination of jobs supported by 
federal arbitration board. UNITED STATES: 
1070. 

Disabled Persons 

Awards to employers (Saskatchewan) and to 
handicapped man and woman of year (New- 
foundland), 137. 

Design of Work for the Disabled, industrial ap- 
plication ergonomics research. BRITAIN: 
1101. 



INDEX 



XI 



Employment of disabled persons, St. Vincent 
Hospital, Ottawa, 288. 

Inter-American Conference on Rehabilitation, 
5th, 35. 

National Advisory Council on the Rehabilitation 
of Disabled Persons, 190; meeting, 2nd, 478. 

Pan-Pacific Seminar on Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion of the Disabled, 35. 

World Congress of the International Society for 
Rehabilitation of the Disabled, Copenhagen, 
Denmark— Danish program studied, 790. 

Disabled Persons Allowances 
CNTU, views, 17. 
Statistics. CANADA: 195. 459, 774, 963. 

Discrimination 

Anti-discrimination legislation in 1963. CAN- 
ADA: 877. 

N.S. Human Rights Act: regulations, 877. 

Protection Under Law Against Employment Dis- 
crimination, booklet, federal Department of 
Labour, 986. 

Que. Hotels Act: provisions, 878. 

U.N. Subcommission on Prevention of pis- 
crimination and the Protection of Minorities, 
985. 
Dodge, William, Executive Vice-President, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress 

Remarks — 
Educational Conference, OFL, 278. 
National Productivity Council, labour-man- 
agement seminar, 457. 

Dominion Auto Carriers, Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters): 504; 

granted, 692. 
Dispute (Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 694. 

Dominion Auto Transit Company Limited 
Certification application ■ (Teamsters) : 390; 
granted, 692. 

Dominion Tar and Chemical Company, 
Limited 
Labour-management seminar, 110. 

Douglas, H. R. (et al) 

Application for revocation of certification (Ma- 
chinists): 48; representation vote, 142; 
granted, 225. 
Douglas, T. C, Leader, New Democratic Party 
Quebec Federation of Labour, remarks, 31. 

Dymond, Dr. W. R., Assistant Deputy Minister, 
Federal Department of Labour 
B.C. Conference on Industrial Relations, on 
role of collective bargaining research and sta- 
tistics in industrial relations, presents paper, 
666. 
Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Confer- 
ence on Manpower Development and Train- 
ing, presents paper, 964. 
Home Builders' Association of Greater Ottawa, 
address, 287. 
91182—3 



E 



Earnings See Wages and Salaries 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654): CO. 
appointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; CB. 
fully constituted, 397; CB. report, settlement, 
808. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1842): CO. 
appointed, 309; CB. appointed, 311; CB. 
fully constituted, 396; CB. report, settlement, 
805. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1869): CO. 
appointed, 1115. 
Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited 
Certification application (Machinists): 1016; 
granted, 1109. 

Eastern Transport Limited 

Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 
Workers): CO. appointed, 310; settlement, 
800. 
Economic Policy 

Active economy, 1963, predicted, President, 
CCC, 4. 

CLC, views, 14. 

CMA Plenary Conference on Economic 
Growth, 587. 

"Economic Planning for Canada?"— article, 
Queen's Quarterly (1963), 483. 

Federal assistance, 35 designated areas 
qualify. CANADA: 864. 

National Economic Development Board, forma- 
tion approved, Railway Brotherhoods, 20. 

National Economic Development Council, re- 
port. BRITAIN: 458. 

Year-end economic review (1962), federal De- 
partment of Trade and Commerce, 4. 

Economic Stevedoring Corporation 

Dispute (Longshoremen): CO. appointed, 1115. 

Education See also School Attendance; Tech- 
nological Education; Training; Workers' 
Education 

CCC, recommendations, 22. 

Directory of Canadians Studying in the United 
States, 1962-1963, federal Department of 
Labour, 109. 

Educational Conference, Ontario Federation of 
Labour, 278. 

High school diploma minimum requirement in 
hiring policies. UNITED STATES: 6. 

More federal aid for vocational schools urged, 
Standing Committee of Ministers of Educa- 
tion, Canadian Education Association, 969. 

Need for education stressed, CCA President 
Thomas A. Somerville, 963. 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 20. 

School drop-outs. UNITED STATES: 508. 

University enrolment, Canadian women, 37. 

University graduates, survey of supply and 
demand (1963). CANADA: 12, 
Eighteen, Stan, Canadian Brotherhood of Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers 

Death, 458. 



xn 



INDEX 



Eldorado Mining and Refining Group (CSAC) 
Certification application: 
Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited: re- 
quest for review of decision, 390; granted, 
502. 

Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited 
Certification application (CSAC): request for 
review of decision, 390; granted, 502. 

Elections 

Quebec Federation of Labour, resolution, 32. 

Electrical Installations 

Man. Electricians' Licence Act: amendments, 

612. 
N.B. Electrical Installation and Inspection Act: 

provisions, 1088. 

Electrical Workers 
Electricians' 25-hour week, effects of. NEW 
YORK CITY: 823. 

Electrical Workers, International Brother- 
hood of 
Certification application: 
Federal Electric Corporation (Dew Line) : 
799; granted, 1109; reasons for judgment, 
1111. 
Dispute : 

Vancouver Hotel Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 602; settlement, 899. 

Electronic Data Processing 

A Second Survey of Electronic Processing in 
Canada, 1962, Department of Labour. 
CANADA: 867. 

Elevators 

Alta. Elevators and Fixed Conveyances Act: 

amendment, 509. 
Man. Elevator Act: provisions, 1087. 

Empire Freightways, Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers, intervener) : rejected, 
389; request for review of decision, 504; 
request denied, 504. 

Certification application (Teamsters): 226; re- 
jected, 389; request for review of decision, 
504; denied, 503. 

Employer Organizations 

Amalgamation. BRITAIN: 656. 

Employment See also Child Labour; Older 
Workers; Termination of Employment. 

Contracts of Employment Act. BRITAIN: 996. 

High school diploma minimum requirement in 
hiring policies. UNITED STATES: 6. 

Manpower situation. CANADA: fourth quarter, 
1962, 24. 
Regional Manpower situation. CANADA: 27. 

"Self-Respect Through Employment" theme, 
Pan-Pacific Seminar on Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion of the Disabled, 35. 

Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earnings" 
(monthly feature). "D-National Employment 
Service Statistics" (monthly feature). 

Substantial increase, 1962. CANADA: 114. 



Thirty-six per cent women in paid employment. 
UNITED STATES: 411. 

Transition from School to Work, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 112. 

Women Graduates in Part-time Work — report 
(with ILO), International Federation of 
University Women, 494. 

World Labour Situation, 1962, ILO Survey, 117, 
118. 

Employment Security 

IAPES, convention, 50th, 784. 
Manpower Consultative Service, establishment, 
federal Department of Labour, 999. 

Employment Service See National Employ- 
ment Service 

Employment Standards See Labour Standards 

Engineers See also Publications 

Ratio, hourly production workers and techni- 
cians to engineers and scientists, aircraft plant, 
drop. UNITED STATES: 548. 

Equal Pay for Equal Work 

Equal Pay Act of 1963. UNITED STATES: 792. 
U.S. Equal Pay Bill, enactment, 551. 

Express Services Inc. 

Certification application (Mine Workers): 1015; 
withdrawn, 1016; granted, 1109. 



F 



Factories 

Ont. Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: 
amendments, 1086. 

Fair Employment Practices See Discrimination 
Fad* Labour Standards See Labour Standards 
Fad* Labor Standards Act (U.S.A.) 

Amendment re equal pay, 792. 
Fad* Wages See also Labour Conditions 

Man. Fair Wage Act: amendment, 1081; regula- 
tions, 509. 
N.B. Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: 
amendment, 1081. 

Family Allowances 
CNTU, views, 17. 

Faraday Uranium Mines Limited 

Dispute (Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers): 
C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 
C.B. report. 606. 

Farm Safety, See Safety, Industrial 
Federal Electric Corporation (Dew Line) 
Certification application (Electrical Workers): 

799; granted, 1109; reasons for judgment, 

1111. 

Financial Administration Act 

Regulations, 612. 
Fire Departments 

Ont. Fire Department Act: amendment, 1082. 
Fire Equipment 

B.C. Fire Marshal Act: regulations, 821. 



INDEX 



xui 



Fire Prevention 
Alta. Fire Prevention Act: regulations, 64. 

Firemen See Diesel Firemen; Operating 
Engineers 

Fishing 

ILO Committee on Conditions of Work in the 
Fishing Industry, 140. 

Flanders Van Service Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters): 389; with- 
drawn, 694. 

Ford, C. R., Director, Technical and Vocational 
Training Branch, Department of Labour 

Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Confer- 
ence on Manpower Development and Train- 
ing, remarks, 964. 

First national conference, Institute of Tech- 
nology Administrators, remarks, 967. 

National Advisory Committee on Technological 
Education, remarks, 209. 

Francis, J. P., Director, Economics and Research 
Branch, Department of Labour 
"Manpower Implications of Technological 
Change in Canada" — address, McGill Univer- 
sity's Industrial Relations Conference, 462. 

Franklyne, Gerald (et al) 

Application for revocation of certification (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers) : 
granted, 142; 143. 



Grants See University Research Grants 
Grimshaw Trucking and Distributing Limited 
Certification application (Association of Em- 
ployees of Grimshaw Trucking) : 694; granted, 



G 



Gas, Natural 

B.C. Gas Act: amendment, 1023. 

General Enterprises Limited 

Dispute (Carpenters): CO. appointed, 602; 
settlement, 603. 

Germany 

Seven graduates, Canadian institutes of tech- 
nology, study in German industry, 456. 

Gill, Ernest C. 

Chairman, Committee of Inquiry into Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act, report, 119. 

Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited 
Dispute (Teamsters): settlement, 396. 

Glassco Royal Commission on Government 
Organization 
CNTU views, 17. 

GOLDENBERG, H. CARL, OBE, QC 

Address, Facing Facts in Labour Relations, 127. 
Goodrich, B.F., Canada Limited 
Yohe, Dr. R. V., President, addresses Windsor 
Chamber of Commerce, 125. 

Government Annuities Act 
Administration, 546. 
91182— 3£ 



897. 



H 



Hall, Frank H., Brotherhood of Railway and 
Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express 
and Station Employees 
Canadian Executive Assistant to Grand Presi- 
dent, appointment, 551. 

Hamilton Shipping Company Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654) : CO. 
appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 
fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, settle- 
ment, 808. 

Handicapped Persons See Disabled Persons 

Hanson Transport Company Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters): C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Haythorne, George V., Deputy Minister, Federal 
Department of Labour 
Addresses, remarks, etc. — 

National Advisory Committee on Technologi- 
cal Education, 209. 
National Advisory Council on the Rehabili- 
tation of Disabled Persons, 478. 
National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 9. 
Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Confer- 
ence on Manpower Development and Train- 
ing, 964. 

Hazardous Occupations 

Fair Labor Standards Act, Hazardous Occupa- 
tions Order No. 17. UNITED STATES: 615. 

Health See also Mental Health 

Man. Public Health Act: amendment, 714. 

Health, Industrial 

Legislation enacted in 1963. CANADA: 1083. 
Railway Brotherhoods, views re health of and 
sanitation facilities for, railway employees, 
19. 

Hees, Hon; George, Federal Minister of Trade 
and Commerce 
Year-end economic review (1962), 4. 

High Schools See Training 
Highways 

N.B. Highway Act: provision, 1081. 

Hill The Mover (Canada) Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters) : employees at Ottawa and 
Toronto Terminals: settlement, 49. 

Hiring Policies 

High school diploma minimum requirement in 
hiring policies. UNITED STATES: 6. 

Hoists See Construction Industry 



XIV 



INDEX 



Home Building See Construction Industry; 
Housing 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bar- 
tenders' International Union 
Disputes: 

Canadian National Hotels, Limited (New- 
foundland Hotel, St. John's): CO. ap- 
pointed, 144; settlement, 311. 
Canadian National Hotels, Limited (Nova 
Scotian Hotel, Halifax): C. O. appointed, 
505; settlement, 694. 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited: settle- 
ment, 49. 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Que. Hotels Act: provisions, 878. 
Hours of Work 

B.C. Hours of Work Act: amendments, 236, 
404; regulation, 612. 

Electricians' 25-hour week, effects of. NEW 
YORK CITY: 823. 

National Incomes Commission report examines 
agreements affecting construction industry, 
condemns restriction in hours. BRITAIN: 
550. 

N.B. Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: 
amendment, 1081. 

Nfld. Hours of Work Act: provisions, 1082. 

Ont. Fire Department Act: amendment, 1082. 

Sask. Hours of Work Act: order, 405; revised 
regulations, 154. 

Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earn- 
ings" (monthly feature) 

House Building Incentive Program 
Activities, 1068. 
Administration, 862. 

Housing 

CNTU views, home building loans, 17. 

Hubert Transport Inc. 

Certification application (Teamsters) : 898; rep- 
resentation vote, 1109. 

Hull City Transport Limited 

Dispute (Street Railway Employees) : CO. 

appointed, 49; CB. appointed, 49; CB. 

fully constituted, 227; CB. report, 900; 
settlement, 899. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited 

Dispute (Street Railway Employees): CO. 
appointed, 49; CB. appointed, 49: CB. fully 
constituted, 227; CB. report, 900; settlement, 
899. 

Human Rights 

Human Rights in Canada, 1958-1963, develop- 
ments since 10th anniversary of Universal 
Declaration, 978. 

Labour Gazette, special section, marks 15th 
anniversary of the Declaration of Human 
Rights, message of Minister of Labour, Hon. 
Allan J. MacEachen, 973. 



N.S. Human Rights Act: regulations, 877. 

Ont. Human Rights Code, 985. 

Universal Declaration of Human Rights drafted 
by U.N. Commission on Human Rights, 977. 

Universal Declaration of Human Rights, fif- 
teenth anniversary, 974. 

Huneault, J. A., Chairman, National Legislative 
Committee, International Railway Brother- 
hoods 
Labour Day message, 660. 

Hutchinson, A. A., Chairman, National Legisla- 
tive Committee, International Railway Brother- 
hoods 
Retirement, 20. 



Inaerco Limited 

Certification application (Taggart Employees' 
Association) : 48. 

Income 

Income continuance plan — B.C. Hydro and 

Power Authority and Street Railwaymen, 311. 
Increase in 1962. CANADA: 114. 
National Incomes Commission report examines 

agreements affecting construction industry. 

BRITAIN: 550, 865. 

Income Tax See Taxation 

Indicative Programming 

Role of indicative programming in economic 
successes of some western countries — Dr. R. V. 
Yohe at Windsor Chamber of Commerce, 125. 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations 
of Ontario 
Address, J. H. Currie, Director, Accident Pre- 
vention and Compensation Branch, federal 
Department of Labour, 485. 

Industrial Development See Economic Policy 
Industrial Disputes See Labour Disputes 
Industrial Establishments 

Training programs. CANADA: 966. 
Industrial Fatalities See Accidents, Industrial 

Industrial Inquiry Commission on the Disrup- 
tion of Shipping 

Report, Hon. T. G. Norris, 775. 
Industrial Relations See also Legal Decisions 

Ainsborough, Francis J., chief conciliator, 
federal Department of Labour, retirement, 
360. 

B.C. Conference on Industrial Relations, 661. 

B.C. Government plans industrial relations con- 
ference, 194. 

B.C. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 873. 

CMA, Industrial Relations Conference, 579. 

Dion, Rev. Gerard, Director, Industrial Rela- 
tions Department, Laval University, resigna- 
tion, 657. 

Dymond, Dr. W. R., Assistant Deputy Minister 
of Labour — paper presented to B.C. Confer- 
ence on Industrial Relations, 666. 



INDEX 



xv 



First area Labour-Management Co-operation 
Conference held in Quebec province, spon- 
sored by federal Department of Labour, 456. 

Goldenberg, H. Carl, OBE, QC, address on 
Facing Facts in Labour Relations, 127. 

Industrial Relations and Conciliation (monthly 
feature) 
' Industrial Relations Branch, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, functions, 454. 

Labour relations legislation, 1963. CANADA: 
873. 

Labour Relations Policy and the Building Trades 
in Canada — Session 111, Industrial Relations 
Conference, McGill University, 470. 

Laval University, Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, 592. 

Man. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 876; 
regulations, 509. 

McGill University, Industrial Relations Con- 
ference. 460. 

Nfld. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 874. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 875. 

Personnel Association of Toronto Inc., confer- 
ence, 21st, 363. 

Que. Labour Code: not passed, 876. 

Survey, National Industrial Conference Board's 
Canadian office, non-bargaining management- 
labour sessions, 399. 

Woods, Prof. H. D., Director, Industrial Rela- 
tions Centre, McGill University, re-appoint- 
ment, 77. 

Industrial Standards 

Nfld.- Industrial Standards Act: provisions, 1080. 
Industry 

Employer organizations, amalgamate for "na- 
tional industrial organization". BRITAIN: 
656. 

Injunctions 

N.S. Supreme Court (Appeal Side) . . . con- 
firms granting of injunction and damages for 
engaging in an unlawful strike and picketing, 
506. 

Ont. High Court dissolves interim injunction 
against secondary picketing; says union exer- 
cising common-law right, 401. 

Quebec Federation of Labour, resolution, 32. 

Inter-City Truck Lines Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters) : C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

International Affairs 
CLC views, 15. 

International Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security 
Convention, 50th, 784. 
International Federation of University Women 
Women Graduates in Part-time Work — report 
on survey in co-operation with ILO, 494. 

International Labour Organization 
Algeria, 104th member country, 45. 
Asian Regional Conference, fifth, 306. 
Burundi, 106th member country, 307. 
CNTU's education director serves ILO in 
Central African Republic, 656. 



General Conference — Session, 47th: 681; Cana- 
dian delegation, 500; report, Director General, 
David A. Morse, 385. 

Governing Body — Session, 154th: 307. 

Industrial Committees — Textiles Committee, 
Session, 7th, 499. 

International Centre for Advanced Training in 
Turin, 307. 

ILO Committee of Experts on Social Security, 
meeting, 140. 

ILO Committee on Conditions of Work in the 
Fishing Industry, 140. 

Jamaica, 105th member country, 145. 

Philip, Jean, workers' education expert, Algeria, 
six-month assignment, 961. 

Riddell, Dr. Walter A., adviser to government 
delegates, first International Labour Confer- 
ence, death of, 656. 

Roberts, Sir Alfred, former Workers' Vice- 
Chairman, Governing Body, death of, 1070. 

South Africa excluded from meetings by Govern- 
ing Body, 690. 

Tripartite Technical Meeting for Printing and 
Allied Trades, 45. 

Waisglass, Harry (United Steel workers), assign- 
ment, Labour Research Unit, Singapore, 1089. 

Women Graduates in Part-time Work — report 
on survey by International Federation of 
University Women, 494. 

World Labour Situation in 1962, 117. 

International Social Security Association 
McGregor, James, Unemployment Insurance 
Commission (Canada), appointment, vice- 
chairman, 960. 

International Trade See Trade 
International Typographical Union 

Photocomposition work awarded union by 

National Labor Relations Board. UNITED 

STATES: 361. 

Irving Oil Company 

Certification application (new) (Seafarers) : 48; 
withdrawn, 309. 



Jarraud, Lucien (et al) 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
application for revocation, 143; rejected, 389; 
reasons for judgment, 391. 
Jenoves, William, General Vice-President, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress 
60 years a trade unionist, 773. 

Jodoin, Claude, President, Canadian Labour 

Congress 
CMA Plenary Conference on Economic Growth, 

remarks, 588. 
Labour Day message, 659. 
Quebec Federation of Labour, remarks, 31. 



K 



Kaiser Steel Corporation 
Agreement with Steelworkers — sharing of sav- 
ings in production costs, jobs security pro- 
visions, incentive pay. UNITED STATES: 6. 



XVI 



INDEX 



Kent Line Limited (Irving Oil Company) 

Certification application (Seafarers) : with- 
drawn, 49. 



Labour College of Canada 
Opened in Montreal, 554; first course, June 
1964, 405. 

Labour Conditions 

Improved working conditions in Canadian in- 
dustry, 1962, 114. 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Con- 
tracts (monthly feature) 

Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1962, 
federal Department of Labour, 199. 

Working Conditions in Manufacturing, 1962, 
197 — plant workers, 198; office employees, 
199. 

Labour Day 

Labour Day message, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, 

Minister of Labour, 658. 
Labour Day messages, labour leaders, 659. 

Labour, Department of See also Publications 

Advisory bodies, 190 

National Technical and Vocational Training 

Advisory Council 
National Apprenticeship Training Advisory 

Committee 
National Advisory Committee on Technologi- 
cal Education 
National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons 
Advisory Committee on Professional Man- 
power 
Advisory Committee on Technological Change 
Unemployment Insurance Advisory Com- 
mittee 

Ainsborough, Francis J., chief conciliator, 
federal Department of Labour, retirement, 
360. 

"Department of Labour Today" (monthly 
feature) 

50th anniversary. UNITED STATES: -195. 

"50 Years Ago This Month: from the Labour 
Gazette 19 . . ." (monthly feature) 

Industrial Relations Branch, functions, 454. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Grants, 1962. CANADA: 276. 

MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., Minister of Labour, 
appointment, 360. 

Technical and Vocational Training Branch, co- 
ordinates movement seven graduates, Cana- 
dian institutes of technology, for study in 
Germany industry, 456. 

Labour Development 

Labour development, production, employment 
and incomes, 1962. CANADA: 114. 

Labour Disputes 

Compulsory arbitration, U.S. rail dispute, 773. 

Pan American World Airways — Brotherhood of 

Railway and Steamship Clerks' agreement 

provides final and binding arbitration in any 

dispute if U.S. Railway Labor Act fails, 657. 



Public Interest Disputes and Their Settlement — 
Part IV, Industrial Relations Conference, 
McGill University, 475. 

World Labour Situation, 1962, ILO survey, 117, 
118. 

Labour Force 

Statistics: "A-Labour Force" (monthly feature) 
Labour Income 

Statistics: "B-Labour Income" (monthly feature) 

Labour Laws and Regulations See also Appren- 
ticeship; Discrimination 

Alta. Labour Act: amendments, 320. 

Bill C-70, safety in Government, proposed 
legislation. CANADA: 485. 

B.C. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 873. 

Canadian Association of Administrators of La- 
bour Legislation, 22nd conference, 917. 

Daley, Charles, former Ontario Minister of 
Labour — resignation as member of Ontario 
Legislature, 457. 

43 U.S. states enact labour legislation in 1963. 
917. 

Labour legislation, CCC, recommendations, 21. 

Labour relations legislation, 1963. CANADA: 
873. 

Man. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 876. 

Nfld. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 874. 

Ont. Department of Labour Act: regulations, 
revised, 714. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 875. 

Provincial labour bills, progress report, 194. 

Que. Labour Code: not passed, 876. 

"Recent Regulations under Provincial Legisla- 
tion" ("monthly feature) 

Strike-breaking legislation to prohibit or regu- 
late. UNITED STATES: 311. 

U.S. Equal Pay Bill, enactment, 551. 

Labour-Management Co-operation 

Dodge, William, Vice-President, CLC, remarks 
at seminar sponsored by NPC, 457. 

Dominion Tar and Chemical Company, Limited, 
labour-management seminar, 110. 

First area Labour-Management Co-operation 
Conference held in Quebec province, spon- 
sored by federal Department of Labour, 456. 

Labour-Management Committees in Canadian 
industry, number of, 106. 

Labour-management-university seminar at Saska- 
toon (3rd), 193. 

National Productivity Council — Labour Man- 
agement Seminar: fourth, University of Mont- 
real and Quebec Economic Advisory Council, 
457. 

Pare, Rene, President, Quebec Economic 
Advisory Council, remarks at seminar spon- 
sored by NPC, 457. 

"Teamwork in Industry" (monthly feature) 
Labour-Management Relations 

Dalhousie University, Institute of Public Affairs 
conference of Nova Scotia labour and man- 
agement representatives: first conference, 110; 
second conference, 1069. 

Personnel Association of Toronto Inc., con- 
ference, 21st, 363. 

Survey, Canadian office, National Industrial 
Conference Board, non-bargaining manage- 
ment-labour sessions, 399. 



INDEX 



xvn 



Labour Organizations 
Industrial and geographic distribution of union 
membership, 1962. CANADA: 201. 

Labour Relations See Industrial Relations; 
Legal Decisions 

Labour Representation 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 20. 
Labour Standards 

Legislation enacted in 1963. CANADA: 1080. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: amendments, 
821. 

Provincial Labour Standards, 1962 edition, fed- 
eral Department of Labour, 456. 

U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act: Hazardous 
Occupations Order No. 17, 615. 

Labour Statistics 

"Latest Labour Statistics' (monthly feature) 
Labour Unions See also Legal Decisions 

"Automation Protection Plan", agreement, 

International Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union and Shipping Federation of 

British Columbia, 772. 
CBRT, death of Stan Eighteen, Secretary, Joint 

Protective Board, 458. 
CBRT, leaves non-op railway unions' Joint 

Negotiating Committee, 961. 
CLC, brief to federal Cabinet, 13. 
CUPE, formation, 866; merger of NUPE and 

NUPSE, 111. 
CNTU, appoints four regional directors, 457. 
CNTU, brief to federal Cabinet, 16. 
CNTU's education director serves ILO in 

Central African Republic, 656. 
Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act, 

regulations, 235. 
Free world's women unionists, meeting. 

VIENNA: 280. 
Industrial and geographic distribution of union 

membership, 1962. CANADA: 201. 
International Typographical • Union awarded 

photocomposition work by U.S. National 

Labor Relations Board, 361. 
Jenoves, William, General Vice-President, CLC, 

60 years trade unionist, 773. 
Labour College of Canada opened in Montreal, 

554. 
Labour Unions: An Introductory Course for 

Individuals and Studv Groups, CLC labour 

education program, 1143. 
Larivee, Armand, CNTU Vice-President, appoint- 
ment, 773. 
Machinists, International Union of, anniversary, 

75th, 280. 
Maritime Unions Trusteeship Act: enactment, 

provisions, 1090. 
Membership. BRITAIN: 6. 
Membership, 1962. CANADA: 201. 
NUPE and NUPSE, terms of merger, 111. 
Ont. Federation of Labour, convention, 1093; 

Educational Conference, 278. 
Ontario NUPE convention approves merger with 

NUPSE, 458. 
Que. Federation of Labour, convention, 31. 
Railway Brotherhoods, brief to federal Cabinet, 

19. 



Steelworkers' policy conference, 549. 

Thirty-third Annual Conference of Representa- 
tives of Unions Catering for Women Workers, 
599. 

Trenton Construction Workers Association, 
Local 52 (Christian Labour Association of 
Canada) certified by OLRB, Ontario Supreme 
Court ruling 551. 

Union problems adjusting to technological 
change — Director of Research, Industrial 
Relations Counselors, Inc., N.Y., 277. 

Women's Bureau, federal Department of La- 
bour, convenes meeting of trade unionists, 276. 

Lakeland Tankers Limited 

Certification application (Canadian Maritime 
Union): 693; withdrawn, 694. 

Larivee, Armand, Vice-President, Confederation 
of National Trade Unions 
Appointment, 773. 

Laval University See Industrial Relations 
Law Quarries Transportation Limited 

Certification application (Merchant Service) : 
48; withdrawn, 49; granted, 142. 

Le Syndicat des Employes de CFGT 
Dispute : 

Radio Lac St- Jean Limitee (CFGT): CO. 
appointed, 602; settlement, 899. 

Legal Decisions 
Alta. Supreme Court — 

Holds a consent to prosecute was insufficient 

because it did not refer to a specific 

offence, 233. 
Rules Board refusal to make evidence avail- 
able by employer renders certification order 

invalid, 507. 
Rules University not subject to parts of 

Labour Act dealing with certification, 818. 
B.C. Court of Appeal — 
Enjoins picketing that interfered with em- 
ployer's right-of-way in shopping centre, 

706. 
Rules B.C. Supreme Court has jurisdiction to 

hear application to quash federal board 

decision, 57. 
B.C. Supreme Court — 

Determines union members' rights in funds 

of non-contributory pension plan, 911. 
Enjoins peaceful picketing away from the 

sole place of business of an employer, 817. 
Enjoins strike because some of unions jointly 

certified failed to comply with provisions 

of Act, 400. 
Quashes arbitration award under a collective 

agreement on ground of error on face of 

the award, 315. 
Legal Decisions Affecting Labour (monthly 

feature) 
Man. Court of Appeal — 

Holds unions and employers' organizations not 

liable for damages for members' unauthor- 
ized acts, 148. 
Upholds validity of order by Labour Relations 

Board for the taking of a representation 

vote, 232. 



XVIII 



INDEX 



N.S. Supreme Court (Appeal Side) confirms 

granting of injunction and damages for 

engaging in an unlawful strike and picketing, 

506. 
Ont. Court of Appeal — 

Enjoins picketing of retailer, stating that 
secondary picketing is illegal "per se", 815. 

Holds that carrier engaged in interconnect- 
ing undertaking falls within federal juris- 
diction, 611. 

Quashes Labour Relations Board's order that 
reinstated person exercising managerial 
functions, 313. 

Restores arbitration award in which the board 
declined jurisdiction to hear union's 
grievance, 312. 

Rules arbitrators under collective agreement 
constitute statutory board, decisions review- 
able, 59. 

Rules Ontario Board not a Crown Agency and 
is subject to Labour Relations Act, 909. 
Ont. High Court- 
Dissolves interim injunction against secondary 
picketing; says union exercising common- 
law right, 401. 

Enjoins peaceful picketing because union had 
not exhausted prescribed conciliation pro- 
ceedings, 402. 

Rules Bell Telephone Company subsidiary is 
not subject to federal labour legislation, 
1120. 

Rules international union entitled to assets of 
its chartered local union on its dissolu- 
tion, 234. 

Rules Ontario Food Terminal Board, being an 
employer, is subject to Labour Relations 
Act, 61. 

Rules trade union a juridical entity under the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act, 914. 

Upholds Labour Relations Board order giving 
union leave to prosecute employer, 1122. 
Que. Court of Queen's Bench — 

Rules decision of Labour Relations Board in 
certification case cannot be challenged by 
writ, 609. 

Rules granting of permission to prosecute is 
administrative act that can't be stopped by 
writ, 608. 

Upholds Board's decision to cancel one and 
order second representation election, 1021. 
Sask. Court of Appeal — 

Declines to order quashing of Board's order 
on issues within its jurisdiction, 1022. 

Rules that company under contract to work 
for federal corporation not subject to IRDI 
Act, 150. 
Supreme Court of Canada rules Board may vary 
certification order by substituting successor 
union as bargaining agent, 146. 
Supreme Court of the United States — 

Limits union action in collecting and using 
dues for political purposes, 707. 

Rules agency shop permissible under Taft- 
Hartley Act if not banned by State, 709. 

Rules jurisdiction of National Labor Rela- 
tions Board does not extend to foreign-flag 
shipping, 316. 



Rules State courts have jurisdiction in cases 
arising from picketing of foreign-flag ship- 
ping, 318. 

Rules States may prohibit agency shop agree- 
ments though allowed by Taft-Hartley, 711. 
Trenton Construction Workers Association, 

Local 52 (Christian Labour Association of 

Canada) certified by OLRB, Ontario Supreme 

Court ruling, 551. 

Level Crossings 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 20. 

Libraries 

Publications Recently Received in Department of 
Labour Library. CANADA: (monthly fea- 
ture). 

Licensing of Workmen 

Man. Electricians' Licence Act: amendments, 
612. 

Little, Walter Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters) : C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Loans See Housing 

Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of 
Certification applications: 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 

Company (locomotive engineers): 1110. 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company (locomotive firemen and 
helpers): 1110. 
Michigan Central Railroad Company (loco- 
motive engineers): representation vote, 47: 
granted, 225. 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brother- 
hood of 
Intervener, certification application: 

Michigan Central Railroad: representation 
vote, 47; granted, 225. 

Logging 

Ont. Loggers' Safety Act: provisions, 1083. 

Longshoremen of Sorel, Inc., National and 
Catholic Syndicate of 
Certification application: 

North- American Elevators Limited: 504; 
granted, 692. 

Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, 
International 
"Automation Protection Plan", agreement, union 
and Shipping Federation of British Columbia, 
772. 
Certification applications: 

Lynn Terminals Limited: 389; granted, 502. 
Northland Terminals Company Limited: 

rejected, 47. 
Western Stevedoring Company Limited: 
representation vote, 225; granted, 389. 
Disputes : 

Shipping Federation of British Columbia: C.B. 
fully constituted, 311; C.B. report, 697; 
settlement, 899. 
Vancouver Wharves Limited: CO. appointed, 
309; C.B. appointed, 396; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 397; C.B. report, 695; settlement, 
899. 



INDEX 



XIX 



Longshoremen's Association, International 
Certification applications: 

Malone and Company (1959) Limited, J.C.: 

693; granted, 798. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc. 601. 
Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited: 693; 

granted, 798. 
Disputes : 

Brown and Ryan Limited (Local 1654): CO. 

appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted 397; C.B. report, settle- 
ment, 808. 
Brown and Ryan Limited (Local 1842): CO. 

appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted, 396; C.B. report, settle- 
ment, 805. 
Brown and Ryan Limited (Local 1869): CO. 

appointed, 1115. 
Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited (Local 

1654) : CO. appointed, 309: C.B. appointed, 

311; C.B. fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, 

settlement, 808. 
Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited (Local 

1842): CO. appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 

311; C.B. fully constituted 396; C.B. 

report, settlement, 805. 
Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited (Local 

1869): CO. appointed, 1115. 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 

(Local 1654): CO. appointed, 309; C.B. 

appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 397; 

C.B. report, settlement, 808. 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 

(Local 1842): CO. appointed, 309; C.B. 

appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 396; 

C.B. report, settlement, 805. 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company (Local 

1869): CO. appointed, 1115. 
Economic Stevedoring Corporation: CO. ap- 

appointed, 1115. 
Hamilton Shipping Company Limited: CO. 

appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, settle- 
ment, 808. 
Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 

Limited (Local. 1654) : CO. appointed, 309; 

C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 

397; C.B. report, settlement, 808. 
Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 

(Local 1842): CO. appointed, 309; C.B. 

appointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 396; 

C.B. report, settlement, 805. 
Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 

Limited (Local 1869): CO. appointed, 

1115. 
Seaway Forwarding Agencies Limited: CO. 

appointed, 396; settlement, 1016. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc. (Locals 

375, 1657, 1552, 1846, 1605, 1739): CO. 

appointed, 310; C.B. appointed, 800; C.B. 

fully constituted, 1017; C.B. report, 1017. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc. (Local 

1764): CO. appointed, 899. 
Toronto Harbour Commissioners (Local 

1842): CO. appointed, 309. 
Toronto Harbour Commissioners (Local 
1869): CO. appointed, 1115. 



Yorkwood Shipping and Trading Company 
Limited: CO. appointed, 309; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 397; 
C.B. report, settlement, 808. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian National Railways (clerical and 
manual classifications) : granted, 142. 
Lynn Terminals Limited 

Certification application (Longshoremen and 
Warehousemen) : 389; granted, 502. 



M 



MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., Federal Minister of 
Labour 
Appointment, 360. 
Comments, statements, etc. — 

CMA Industrial Relations Conference, 579. 
International Association of Personnel in Em- 
ployment Security, 784. 
National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons, 478. 
National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 557. 
Labour Day message, 658. 
Labour Gazette, 15th anniversary of the Dec- 
laration of Human Rights, message, 973. 
New Year message, 1072. 

Orders vacation pay paid direct to seamen, not 
SIU, 960. 
Machinery 

ILO Convention Concerning Guarding of Ma- 
chinery, text, 685. 
ILO Recommendation Concerning Guarding of 
Machinery, 687. 
Machinists, International Union of 
Anniversary, 75th, 280. 
Applications for revocation of certification: 
Douglas, H. R., (et al) : 48; representation 

vote, 142; granted, 225. 
Robertson, P. G., (et al): 48; representation 

vote, 142; granted, 225. 
Trans-Canada Air Lines: 48; representation 
vote, 142; granted, 225. 
Certification applications : 

Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited: 

1016; granted, 1109. 
TransAir Limited: request for review with- 
drawn, 226. 
Disputes: 

Northern Wings Limited: CO. appointed, 49: 

settlement, 114. 
TransAir Limited: CO. appointed, 396 

settlement, 695. 
Trans-Canada Air Lines: CO. appointed, 800 
C.B. appointed, 899; C.B. fully constituted, 
1016. 
Vancouver Hotel Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 602; settlement, 899. 
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood 
of 
Intervener, certification application: 
Canadian National Railways (clerical and 
manual classifications) : granted, 142. 
Malone and Company (1959) Limited, J.C. 
Certification application (Longshoremen): 693; 
granted. 798. 



XX 



INDEX 



Manpower See also Professional Manpower 
Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Conference 

on Manpower Development and Training, 964. 
Manpower Consultative Service, establishment, 

federal Department of Labour, 999. 
Manpower Development and Training Act. 

UNITED STATES: 280. 
Manpower Implications of Technological Change 

— Session 1, Industrial Relations Conference, 

McGill University, 461. 
National Economic Development Board, forma- 
tion approved, Railway Brotherhoods, 20. 
OECD, Manpower and Social Affairs Committee, 

manpower policy, 1012. 

Manpower Situation See Employment 

Manufacturing 

Survey, collective agreements, Canadian manu- 
facturing industry, 793. 

Working Conditions in Manufacturing, 1962, 
197 — plant workers, 198; office employees, 199. 

Maple Leaf Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
1109. 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited 
Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks): CO. 
appointed, 694; settlement, 800. 

Marchand, Jean, General President, Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions 
Labour Day message, 660. 
Member, federal Royal Commission on bicul- 
turalism, appointment, 657. 

Maritime Unions Trusteeship Act 

Enactment, provisions, 1090. 
McClure Transport Limited 

Certification application (Mine Workers): 143; 
309; granted, 389. 

Dispute (Mine Workers) : CO. appointed, 505. 

McGill University See Industrial Relations 

McGregor, James, Unemployment Insurance Com- 
mission 
Vice-chairman, unemployment insurance com- 
mittee, International Social Security Associa- 
tion, 960. 

Mechanization 
Transition from mechanization to automation, 
address, President, Honeywell Controls 
Limited, Toronto, 555. 

Mental Health 

Mental Health Careers Information, Canadian 
Mental Health Association, 1071. 

Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian 
Certification application: 

Law Quarries Transportation Limited, 48; 
withdrawn, 49; granted, 142. 
Dispute: 

British Yukon Navigation Company Limited: 
CO. appointed, 694; settlement, 694. 

Mergers 
NUPE and NUPSE, 111. 



Michigan Central Railroad 

Certification application (Locomotive Engi- 
neers) : representation vote, 47; granted, 225. 

Certification application (Locomotive Firemen 
and Enginemen, intervener) : representation 
vote, 47; granted, 225. 

Milling, Gordon, United Steelworkers of America 
Member, Pension Commission of Ontario, 657. 

Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Canada), 
International Union of 
Certification applications: 
Bachmeier Diamond and Percussion Drilling 

Company Limited: 799; granted, 897. 
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company 
of Canada, Limited: 601; granted, 798. 
Disputes: 

Boyles Bros. Drilling (Alberta) Limited: CO. 

appointed, 694. 
Faraday Uranium Mines Limited: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 311; C.B. fully constituted, 397; 
C.B. report, 606. 
National Harbours Board (Port Colborne 
Grain Elevator) : settlement, 145. 
Inter-union raiding ban, resolution rejected, 
Steelworkers — Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers, 549. 

Mine Workers of America, United 
Certification applications: 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Belleville Terrace Project): 601; granted, 

692. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Cloverdale Park Project): 142; granted, 

142. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Domaine Estria and Pavilion Mercier 

Projects): 898; withdrawn, 1016. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Domaine Estria, Pavilion Mercier and 

Place Gouin Projects): 1110. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Les Appartements Boulevard Pie IX, Ville 

St. Michel): 601; granted, 692. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Park Royal Housing Project, Ville Saint 

Laurent): 897; granted, 1014. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Place Benoit Project, Ville Saint Laurent) : 

897; granted, 1014. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(St. George Gardens Project): 693; 

granted, 798. 
Express Services Inc. (Porlier Transport 

Limitee) : 1015; withdrawn, 1015; granted, 

1109. 
McClure Transport Limited: 143; 309. 
Dispute: 
McClure Transport Limited: CO. appointed, 

505. 

Minimum Wages 

B.C. Female Minimum Wage Act: orders, 62, 

236, 404, 612, 1024; regulation, 321. 
B.C. Male Minimum Wage Act: orders, 62, 236, 

404, 612, 1024; regulation, 321. 



INDEX 



XXI 



Minimum wage increases had no inflationary 
effects— report, U.S. Secretary of Labor to 
Congress, 277. 

Minimum wage legislation. JAPAN: 971. 

KB. Minimum Wage Act: orders, 64, 151, 236, 
509. 

Nfld. Minimum Wage Act: order, 1025. 
• Ont. Apprenticeship Act: amendment, 1026. 

Ont. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 1080; 
orders, 723. 

P.E.I. Male Minimum Wage Act: orders, 
614, 1126. 

P.E.I. Women's Minimum Wage Act: order, 
1027. 

Que. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 405; 
orders, 524, 724; revised order, 237; suspen- 
sion order, 615. 

Montague, Dr. J. T. Federal Department of 
Labour 
Chairman, B.C. Conference on Industrial Re- 
lations, 661. 

Monteith, Hon. J. W., Minister of National 
Health and Welfare 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 21. 

Montgomery, Hugh R., President, Canadian Con- 
struction Association 
Predicts $7.5 billion construction program 
(1963), 5. 

Morris, Joe, Executive Vice-President, Canadian 
Labour Congress 
Quebec Federation of Labour, remarks, 31. 
Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 
Dispute (Teamsters) : C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Motorways Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters): C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Motorways (Ontario) Limited 

Certification application (National Council of 
Canadian Labour, intervener) : granted, 225. 

Certification application (Teamsters): 143; 
granted, 225. 

Certification application (Transportation Work- 
ers, intervener): granted, 225. 

Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 
See also House Building Incentive Program; 
Unemployment. 
Activities — 

1961-62, 1962-63, 770. 
1963, 277. 
1963-64, 1068. 
CNTU, views, 17. 
Extension April 30 to May 31, 1963, 240. 

Murchison, C. A. L., Commissioner, Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission 
Remarks, IAPES convention, 785. 



N 



National Advisory Committee on Technologi- 
cal Education 
Re, 190. 
Meeting, 2nd, 208; 3rd, 1077. 



National Advisory Council on the Rehabili- 
tation of Disabled Persons 
Meeting, 2nd, 478. 

National Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee 
Anniversary, 20th, 361. 
National Council of Canadian Labour 
Intervener, certification application : 

Motorways (Ontario) Limited: granted, 225. 

National Economic Development Board 

Formation approved, Railway Brotherhoods, 20. 
National Economic Development Council 

Report. BRITAIN: 458. 
National Employment Committee 

Meeting, 82nd, 68. 
National Employment Service 
Monthly report on operations 
Morley, Miss Eleanor, Co-ordinator of 
Women's Employment, Pacific Region, NES, 
retirement, 595. 
Statistics: "D-National Employment Service 

Statistics" (monthly feature) 
University graduates, survey of supply and 
demand (1963), 12. 

National Harbours Board 

Certification application (Police Association) 

(Halifax): 601; granted, 692. 
Certification application (Police Association) 

(Saint John) : granted, 47. 
Dispute (Police Association) (Saint John) : CO. 

appointed, 505; settlement, 603. 
Dispute (Police Brotherhood) (Montreal): 

CO. appointed, 899; C.B. appointed, 1115. 
Dispute (Port Colborne Grain Elevator) (Mine, 

Mill and Smelter Workers): settlement, 145. 
Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks) (Port 

of Quebec): CO. appointed, 694; settlement, 
1115. 

National Harbours Board Police Association 
Certification applications : 

National Harbours Board, Halifax: 601; 

granted, 692. 
National Harbours Board, Saint John: 
granted, 47. 

National Harbours Board Police Brotherhood 
Disputes: 

National Harbours Board (Montreal): CO. 

appointed, 899; C.B. appointed. 1115. 
National Harbours Board (Saint John): CO. 
appointed, 505; settlement, 603. 

National Industrial Conference Board 
Survey, Canadian office, non-bargaining man- 
agement-labour sessions, 399. 

National Labor Relations Board (U.S.A.) 
Awards photocomposition work to typographical 
union, 361. 

National Productivity Council 

Current program and projected activities, con- 
tinued, 457. 



XXII 



INDEX 



Effects of automation and technological change, 
report to Council by J. P. Francis, Director, 
Economics and Research Branch, federal 
Department of Labour, 362. 

Labour-management-university seminar at Saska- 
toon, 3rd, 193. 

Report, 2nd annual, 962. 

Seminar sponsored by Council at University of 
Montreal and Quebec Economic Advisory 
Council, 457. 

National Syndicate of Employees of the 

Trucking Industry, Saguenay-Lake St. 

John, Inc. 
Certification application: 

Roberval Express Limited: 389; granted, 502. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Roberval Express Limited: rejected, 502. 

National Syndicate of Employees of the Voice 
of the East 
Certification application: 
The Voice of the East, Limited (Radio Station 
CHEF): 601; granted, 692. 
Dispute : 
The Voice of the East, Limited (Radio Sta- 
tion CHEF): CO. appointed, 899; settle- 
ment, 1115. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council 
Anniversary, 20th, 361. 
Meeting, 4th, 9; 5th, 557; 6th, 1075. 
Re, 190. 

National Union of Public Employees 
Merger, 111. 

Ontario convention approves merger with 
NUPSE, 458. 

National Union of Public Service Employees 
Merger, 111. 

Ontario NUPE convention approves merger with 
NUPSE, 458. 

New Year's Messages 

Labour leaders, 1073, 1074. 
MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., Minister of Labour, 
1072. 

Niagara Television Limited 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
601. 

Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 227; settlement, 227. 

918 Construction Company Limited 

Dispute (Carpenters) : CO. appointed, 602; 
settlement, 603. 

Norris, Hon. T. G., Industrial Inquiry Commis- 
sion on the Disruption of Shipping 
Report, 775. 
North-American Elevators Limited 

Certification application (Longshoremen, Na- 
tional and Catholic Syndicate) : 504; granted, 
692. 

Northern Cleaning Agencies Inc. 

Dispute (Building Service Employees): CO. 
appointed, 396; settlement, 396. 



Northern Wings Limited 

Dispute (Machinists) : CO. appointed, 49; 
settlement, 144. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited 
Dispute (Seafarers) : CO. appointed, 309. 

Northland Terminals Company Limited 

Certification application (Longshoremen and 
Warehousemen, Canadian Area) : rejected, 47. 

Nuclear Weapons 

Quebec Federation of Labour, resolutions, 32. 



O 



Obituaries 

Blackadar, E. Gordon, former Director, An- 
nities Branch, federal Department of La- 
bour, 548. 

Eighteen, Stan, Canadian Brotherhood of Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers, 458. 

Hereford, Harry, MBE, former senior official, 
federal Department of Labour, 109. 

Lessard, Darnel, CNTU vice-president and 
leader of 1949 Asbestos strike, 656. 

Riddell, Dr. Walter A., first Deputy Minister 
of Labour for Ontario and participant in 
first International Labour Conference, 656. 

Roberts, Sir Alfred, CBE, former ILO, TUC 
official, 1070. 

Sefton, William Henry, staff member, United 
Steelworkers, 961. 

Shea, H. A. "Pat", Canadian labour official,. 
1070. 

Office Buildings See Factories 
Office Employees' International Union 
Certification applications: 
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited: 309; 

granted, 502. 
Bell Telephone Company of Canada: 898; 
granted, 1109; reasons for judgment, 1113. 
Disputes: 
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 800; settlement, 1016. 
Consolidated Freightways: CO. appointed, 
310; settlement, 695. 

Oland Victor, President, Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce 
Predicts active economy (1963), 4. 
Old Age Assistance 

Statistics. CANADA: 195, 459, 774, 963. 
Old Age Pensions See Pensions 
Older Workers 

American Geriatrics Society, meeting, 598. 
"Don't Judge a Man's Worth by His Date of 
Birth", brochure, federal Department of La- 
bour, 377. 
Michigan, University of, Conference on Aging, 

673. 
Older worker employment and training incentive 

program. CANADA: 791; regulations, 1102. 
OECD seminar on age and employment.. 
SWEDEN: 493. 



INDEX 



xxin 



Performance of older workers, industrial re- 
training programs. UNITED STATES: 893. 

Preparation for Retirement — Chief, Division of 
Older Workers, federal Department of La- 
bour, 36. 

Services for Older Workers — action by federal 
Department of Labour and NES to dis- 
courage discrimination in hiring, promotion 
and retention of Canada's older workers, 289. 

Study of the problems of aging — Commission 
on Moral Issues and Social Problems of the 
Board of Evangelism and Social Service of 
the Baptist Convention of Ontario and 
Quebec, 1004. 

Survey of Unemployed Older Workers. UNITED 
STATES: 222. 

U.S. National Council on the Aging, meeting, 
138. 

Ontario Federation of Labour 
Convention, 1093. 
Education conference, 278. 

Ontario Human Rights Code 

Illuminated scroll, distribution of, 985. 

Operating Engineers 

Man. Operating Engineers and Firemen Act: 
amendments, 1087. 

Operating Engineers, International Union of 
Dispute: 

Vancouver Hotel Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 602; settlement, 899. 

Organization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development 

Investigations into professional manpower re- 
quirements — report to Federal-Provincial 
Deputy Ministers' Conference on Manpower 
Development and Training, 964. 

Manpower and Social Affairs Committee, man- 
power policy, 1012. 

Review team examines scientific, technical man- 
power. CANADA: 865. 

Overland Express Limited 

Dispute (Teamsters) : C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 



Pacific Elevators Limited 

Dispute (Brewery Workers) : CO. appointed, 
49; settlement, 227. 

Pacific Inland Express Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters) : granted, 

47. 

Pacific Tanker Company LiMrrED 

Certification application (Railway, Transport and 

General Workers): 1016; withdrawn, 1110. 
Certification application (Seafarers): 504. 

Pacific Western Airlines Flight Attendants' 
Association 
Certification application: 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited: 1015; re- 
jected, 1109. 



Pacific Western Airlines Limited 

Certification application (Flight Attendants): 
1015; rejected, 1109. 

Certification application (Flight Attendants, 
intervener): rejected, 1109. 

Dispute (Air Line pilots) : settlement, 145. 

Dispute (Airlines Traffic Employees) : C.B. 
report, 227; strike action after C.B. proce- 
dure, 311; settlement, 899. 

Dispute (Flight Attendants): C.B. report, 229; 
strike action after C.B. procedure, 311; settle- 
ment, 899. 

Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, 

United 
Disputes: 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited (Humber- 
stone, Ont.): CO. appointed, 899. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills, Limited (laboratory 
department employees) (Humberstone, 
Ont.): CO. appointed, 310. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited (Moose 
Jaw, Sask.): CO. appointed, 396; settle- 
ment, 603. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills (Saskatoon) : CO. 
appointed, 310; C.B. appointed, 396; settle- 
ment, 603. 

Pan American World Airways 

Agreement with Brotherhood of Railway and 
Steamship Clerks provides final and binding 
arbitration in any dispute if U.S. Railway 
Labor Act fails, 657. 

Part-time Employment See Employment 
Pensions 

B.C. Supreme Court determines union members' 
rights in funds of non-contributory pension 
plan, 911 . 

CNTU, views, 17. 

Milling, Gordon, USWA, appointed to Pension 
Commission of Ontario, 657. 

Ont. Pension Benefits Act: provisions, 1096. 

"The Portable Pension Experiment", address, 
Laurence E. Coward, Vice-president and 
Director, William M. Mercer Limited, to Con- 
ference, Personnel Association of Toronto 
Inc., 368. 

Personnel Association of Toronto Inc. 

Conference, 21st, 363. 
Pickands Mather and Company 

Certification application (Steelworkers, Local 

6254): 799; withdrawn, 898. 
Certification application (Steelworkers, Local 
6285): 799; withdrawn, 898. 

Picketing 

B.C. Court of Appeal enjoins picketing that 
interfered with employer's right-of-way in 
shopping centre, 706. 

B.C. Supreme Court enjoins peaceful picketing 
away from the sole place of business of an 
employer, 817. 

N.S. Supreme Court (Appeal Side) confirms 
granting of injunction and damages for en- 
gaging in an unlawful strike and picketing, 
506. 



xxrv 



INDEX 



Ont. Court of Appeal enjoins picketing of 
retailer, stating that secondary picketing is 
illegal "per se", 815. 

Ont. High Court enjoins peaceful picketing be- 
cause union had not exhausted prescribed con- 
ciliation proceedings, 402. 

Ont. High Court dissolves interim injunction 
against secondary picketing; says union exer- 
cising common-law right, 401. 

Supreme Court of the United States rules State 
courts have jurisdiction in cases arising from 
picketing of foreign-flag shipping, 318. 

Pipe Mechanics See Plumbing Industry 

Pipe-lines 

B.C. Pipe-lines Act: amendment, 714. 

Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 

Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654) : CO. 

appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, settlement, 

808. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1842): CO. 

appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 

fully constituted, 396; C.B. report, settlement, 

805. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1869): CO. 

appointed, 1115. 

Planning 

Role of indicative programming in economic 
successes of some western countries — Dr. R. 
V. Yohe at Windsor Chamber of Commerce, 
125. 

Plant Workers See Collective Labour Agree- 
ments 

Plumbing Industry 

Bruce, John W., OBE, retirement as general 
organizer in Canada for United Association 
of Journeymen and Apprentices of the 
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the 
United States and Canada, 196. 

Que. Pipe Mechanics Act: revised regulations, 
1126. 

Political Action 

Quebec Federation of Labour, resolution, 32. 

Pollock, Carl A., President, Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association 
Address, National Conference of Producers and 
Consumers, 283. 

Portable Pensions See Pensions 
Porter Shipping Limited 

Certification application (Seafarers): rejected, 

47. 

Pressure Vessels See Boilers 
Prices 

Prices and the Cost of Living. CANADA: 

(monthly feature) 
Statistics: "F-Prices" (monthly feature) 
World Labour Situation, 1962, ILO Survey, 117, 

118. 

Printing and Allied Trades 

Tripartite Technical Meeting, ILO, 45. 



Productivity See also National Productivity 
Council 

Ratio, hourly production workers and tech- 
nicians to engineers and scientists, aircraft 
plant, drop. UNITED STATES: 548. 

Substantial increase, 1962. CANADA: 114. 

Professional Manpower See also Publications 

Advisory Committee on Professional Manpower, 
190; meeting, 8th, 281. 

OECD examiners review scientific, technical 
manpower. CANADA: 865. 

Ratio, hourly production workers and techni- 
cians to engineers and scientists, aircraft 
plant, drop. UNITEP STATES: 548. 

Survey of Employment and Requirements for 
Engineering and Scientific Manpower in 
Canada (1962): federal Department of La- 
bour, 2. 

Professional Transport Drivers 
Certification application : 
Trimble and Sons Limited, H.M.: 1015; re- 
jected, 1109. 

Professional Women See Women in Industry 
Profits 

Average sales profits, Canadian manufacturing, 
1962, 482. 

Provost, Roger, President, Quebec Federation of 
Labour 
Convention address, 31. 
Public Health See Health 
Public Service 

Alta. Public Service Vehicles Act: regulations, 

1023. 
Quebec Federation of Labour, resolution, 32. 

Public Welfare 

Canadian welfare programs, session, CCC, 989. 
Public Works 

Ont. Public Works Creditors Payment Act, 
1962-63, provisions, 1081. 

Publications 

Departmental Publications — 

A Second Survey of Electronic Data Process- 
ing in Canada, 1962, 867. 

Annual Earnings in the Scientific and Tech- 
nical Professions, 1962, 548. 

Careers for Women in Mathematics, 378. 

Directory of Canadians Studying in the 
United States, 1962-1963, 109. 

Directory of Canadians Studying in the 
United States, 1963-1964, 1031. 

Don't Judge a Man's Worth by His Date of 
Birth, 377. 

Protection Under Law Against Employment 
Discrimination, 986. 

Provincial Labour Standards, 456. 

Technicians in Science and Engineering, 192. 

Transition from School to Work, 112. 

Vacations With Pay, 1951-61: An Examina- 
tion of Vacation Practices in Canadian In- 
dustries, Report No. 4, 553. 

Vocational and Technical Training for Girls, 
108. 



INDEX 



XXV 



Workmen's Compensation in Canada, 1962 
edition, 456. 
Publications Recently Received in Department 
of Labour Library. CANADA: (monthly 
feature) 



Quebec Economic Advisory Council 
Labour-Management seminar sponsored by Na- 
tional Productivity Council, 457. 

Quebec Federation of Labour 
Convention, 31. 



R 



Radio and Television Employees of Canada 
Dispute : 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: CO. ap- 
pointed, 1016. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: repre- 
sentation vote, 1014; granted, 1109. 

Radio Lac St-Jean Limitee (CFGT) 

Dispute (Le Syndicat des Employes de CFGT) : 
CO. appointed, 602; settlement, 899. 

Radio, Roberval Inc. 
Certification application (Syndicate of Employees 
of Station (CHRL) : application for revoca- 
tion, 601; granted, 798. 

Radio Station CHRC Limitee 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees): CO. ap- 
pointed, 1016. 

Radiological Technicians 
Alta. Radiological Technicians Act: provisions, 
1089. 

Ont. Radiological Technicians Act: provisions, 
1086. 

Raiding 
Inter-union raiding ban, resolution rejected, Steel- 
workers-Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, 549. 

Railroad Telegraphers, Order of 
Certification applications: 

Canadian National Railways (unit of various 
system employees in Canada except New- 
foundland): 601. 

Canadian National Railways (Telecommunica- 
tions Department): 601. 

Canadian National Railways (various em- 
ployees in Newfoundland): 601. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (unit of 
various system employees in Canada): 601. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian National Railways (clerical and 
manual classifications) : granted, 142; 
request for review of decision, 390; denied, 
503. 



Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of 
Dispute: 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company: CB. appointed, 145; CB. fully 
constituted, 145; CB. report, 604; settle- 
ment, 603. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight 
Handlers, Express and Station Employees, 
Brotherhood of 
Agreement with Pan American World Airways 
provides final and binding arbitration in any 
dispute if U.S. Railway Labor Act fails, 657. 
Certification applications: 

Canadian National Railways (Newfound- 
land): 693. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company: 694. 
Disputes : 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Mer- 
chandise Services Department, Prairie 
Region) : CO. appointed, 899; settlement, 
1016. 
Maple Leaf Mills Limited: CO. appointed. 

694; settlement, 800. 
National Harbours Board (Port of Quebec): 
CO. appointed, 694; settlement, 1115. 
Hall, Frank H., Canadian Executive Assistant 
to Grand President, appointment, 551. 

Railway Brotherhoods, International 
National Legislative Committee — 
Brief, federal Cabinet, 19. 
Huneault, J. A., Chairman — Labour Day mes- 
sage, 660; New Year message, 1074. 
Hutchinson, A. A., Chairman, retirement, 20. 

Railway, Transport and General Workers, 

Canadian Brotherhood of 
Applications for revocation of certification: 

Armstrong, Eric (et al) : granted, 142; 143. 

Franklyne, Gerald (et al) : granted, 142; 143. 

Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited: granted, 
142; 143. 
Canada Labour Relations Board certifies bar- 
gaining agent for 19,900 CNR clerks, 144. 
Certification applications: 

B.C. Air Lines Limited: 693; granted, 798. 

Canadian National Railways (clerical and 
manual classifications) : granted, 142; re- 
quest for review of decision, 390; denied, 
503. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Bay of 
Fundy Service) : request for review of 
decision: 504; granted, 692. 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited: 1016; with- 
drawn, 1110. 

Vancouver Tug Boat Company Limited: 
1110. 
Disputes : 

British Yukon Navigation Company Limited: 
CO. appointed, 602; settlement, 694. 

Canadian National Hotels, Limited — Bess- 
borough Hotel, Saskatoon: CO. appointed, 
49; settlement, 310. 

Canadian National Hotels, Limited — Chateau 
Laurier Hotel, Ottawa: CB. appointed, 49; 
CB. fully constituted, 145; settlement, 311. 



XXVI 



INDEX 



Canadian National Hotels, Limited — Char- 
lottetown Hotel, Charlottetown: CO. ap- 
pointed, 49; C.B. appointed, 505; C.B. 
fully constituted, 603; settlement, 800. 

Eastern Transport Limited: CO. appointed, 
310; settlement, 800. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited: 
settlement, 145. 

Vancouver Hotel Company, Limited (Hotel 
Vancouver): settlement, 311. 

Viking Tugboat Company Limited: settlement, 
145. 
Eighteen, Stan, Secretary, Joint Protective 

Board, death of, 458. 
Intervener, certification application : 

Empire Freightways Limited: rejected, 389; 
denied, 504; request for review of decision, 
504. 
Leaves non-op railway unions' Joint Negotiat- 
ing Committee, 961. 

Railways See also Canadian Railway Board of 
Adjustment No. 1; Railway Brotherhoods, 
International 

Compulsory arbitration, U.S. rail dispute, 773. 

Labour on U.S. and Canadian railroads — Session 
11, Industrial Relations Conference, McGill 
University, 465. 

Pan American World Airways — Brotherhood of 
Railway and Steamship Clerks' agreement 
provides final and binding arbitration in any 
dispute if U.S. Railway Labor Act fails, 657. 

Railway Act, Railway Brotherhoods views, 19. 

Railway Brotherhoods, brief to federal Cabinet, 
19. 

Rehabilitation 

Awards to employers (Saskatchewan) and to 
handicapped man and woman of year (New- 
foundland), 137. 

Canadian Conference on Sheltered Employment, 
376. 

Elimination of architectural barriers, supple- 
ment to Canadian National Building Code 
urged, 894. 

Employment of disabled persons, St. Vincent 
Hospital, Ottawa, 288. 

Hard of Hearing and Speech Assessment Clinic, 
opened in Halifax, N.S., 288. 

Inter-American Conference on Rehabilitation, 
5th, 35. 

National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons, 190; meeting, 2nd, 
478. 

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Admin- 
istration. UNITED STATES: 221. 

Ontario Association for Retarded Children — 
conference, 10th, 492. 

Ontario County Rehabilitation Council confer- 
ence, 221. 

Pan-Pacific Seminar on Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion of the Disabled, 35 

Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal, 288. 

Vocational Rehabilitation (1962-63). CANADA: 
672. 

World Commission on Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, first International Seminar, 1003. 



World Congress of the International Society for 
Rehabilitation of the Disabled, Copenhagen 
Denmark — Danish program studied, 790. 

World Congress on Rehabilitation, ninth, 597. 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Employees As- 
sociation 
Intervener, certification application 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited: with 
drawn, 898; rejected, 1014 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited 

Certification application (Rempel-Trail Trans 
portation Employees Association, intervener) 
withdrawn, 898; rejected, 1014. 
Certification application (Teamsters, Local 31): 
694; 897; withdrawn, 898; rejected, 1014 
1015. 
Certification application (Teamsters, Loc 
181): 694; 897; withdrawn, 898; rejected 
1014; 1015. 
Representation Votes See Legal Decisions 
Research 

Lack of opportunity in Canada for research 
workers, deplored — President, Canadiar 
Manufacturers' Association, 283. 

Retail, Wholesale and Department Stori 
Union 
Certification application: 
Associated Enterprises Limited: 309; granted 
389. 
Retarded Children See Rehabilitation 
Retirement See Older Workers 
Rhodes, Henry, Assistant Director of Organiza 
tion, Canadian Labour Congress 
Educational Conference, Ontario Federation oi 
Labour, remarks, 278. 
Right to Strike See Strikes and Lockouts 
Robertson, P. G. (et al) 

Application for revocation of certificatior 

(Machinists) : 48; representation vote, 142 

granted, 225. 

Roberval Express Limited 

Certification application (intervener, Nationa 
Syndicate of the Employees of the Trucking 
Industry, Saguenay-Lake St. John, Inc.): re 
jected, 502. 
Certification application (intervener, Teamsters) 

502. 
Certification application (National Syndicate oi 
the Employees of the Trucking Industry, Sa 
guenay-Lake St. John, Inc.): 389; granted 
502; rejected, 502. 
Certification application (Teamsters) : 309 
granted, 502; rejected, 502. 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited 

Dispute (Packinghouse Workers) (Humberstone 

Ont.): CO. appointed, 899. 

Dispute (Packinghouse Workers) (laboratory 

department employees, Humberstone, Ont.) 

CO. appointed, 310. 

Dispute (Packinghouse Workers) (Moose Jaw 

Sask.): CO. appointed, 396; settlement, 603 

Dispute (Packinghouse Workers) (Saskatoon 

Sask.): CO. appointed, 310; C.B. appointed 

396; settlement, 603. 



INDEX 



XXVII 



Rod Service (Ottawa) Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters) (mail truck 
drivers): 48; granted, 142. 

Certification application (Teamsters) (me- 
chanics, garage employees): 1016; granted, 
1109. 

Dispute (Teamsters): CO. appointed, 396; 
settlement, 505. 

Royal Commission on Biculturalism 
Marchand, Jean, President, CNTU, appointed to 
membership, 657. 



Sabbaticals See Vacations 

Sabo Machine and Tool Works, Inc. 

UAW agreement, annual salary for plant 

workers (production and maintenance). 

UNITED STATES: 7. 

Safety, Industrial See also Accidents, In- 
, dustrial 

Accident Prevention and Compensation Branch, 
federal Department of Labour, annual report, 
1066. 

Accident prevention, Canadian Government 
agencies recognize need for, 276. 

Address, IAPA conference, J. H. Currie, 
Director, Accident Prevention and Compensa- 
tion Branch, federal Department of Labour, 
485.' 

Farm safety regulations. BRITAIN: 65. 

ILO Convention Concerning Guarding of Ma- 
chinery, text, 685. 

ILO Recommendation Concerning Guarding of 
Machinery, 687. 

Legislation enacted in 1963. CANADA: 1083. 

Man: Elevator Act: provisions, 1087. 

Ont. Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act: revised 
regulations, 1084. 

Ont. Construction Safety Act: amendments, 
1085. 

Ont. Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: 
amendments, 1086. 

Ont. Loggers' Safety Act: amendments, 1083. 

Work injuries in federal public service: report 
of Accident Prevention and Compensation 
Branch, federal Department of Labour, 654. 

St. Lawrence Rendering Company Limited 
Certification application (Teamsters) : 504; re- 
jected, 692. 

Salaries See Wages and Salaries 
Sales Profits See Profits 
Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 
Dispute (Brewery Workers) : CO. appointed, 
49; settlement, 227. 

School Attendance 
Alta. School Act: amendment, 1083. 
Man. School Attendance Act: amendments, 
1082. 

School Drop-outs See Education 



Schools 

Transition from School to Work, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 112. 

Federal aid to school construction projects 
under Technical and Vocational Training 
Assistance Act modified, 192. 

Science See Publications 

Scientific Employees See Professional Man- 
power 

Seafarers International Union 
Certification applications: 

Irving Oil Company (unlicenced personnel) : 

48; withdrawn, 309. 
Irving Oil Company (marine engineers) : 48; 

withdrawn, 309. 
Kent Line Limited (Irving Oil Company) : 

withdrawn, 49. 
Pacific Tanker Company Limited: 504. 
Porter Shipping Limited, rejected, 47. 
Disputes: 

Alaska Cruise Lines, Limited: CO. appointed, 

144; settlement, 396. 
Canadian National Steamship Company 

Limited: CO. appointed, 800; settlement, 

899. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (S.S. 

Princess Helene) : settlement, 49. 
Northland Navigation Company Limited: CO. 

appointed, 309. 
Vacation pay paid direct to seamen, not to 
SIU, 960. 

Seamen 
Vacation pay paid direct to seamen, not to SIU. 
CANADA: 960. 

Seaway Forwarding Agencies Limited 

Dispute (Longshoremen) : CO. appointed, 396; 
settlement, 1016. 

Seniority 

Discussion, U.S. National Council on the Aging, 
138. 

Sheltered Employment 

Canadian Conference on Sheltered Employment, 
376. 

Shipping 

Report, Hon. T. G. Norris, Industrial Inquiry 
Commission on the Disruption of Shipping, 
775. 
Shipping Federation of British Columbia 
"Automation Protection Plan", agreement, 
Federation and International Longshoremen's 
and Warehousemen's Union, 772. 
Dispute (Longshoremen and Warehousemen) 
(Canadian Coast Negotiating Committee): 
CB. fully constituted, 311; CB. report, 697; 
settlement, 899. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc. 

Certification application (Longshoremen): 601. 

Dispute (Longshoremen) : CO. appointed, 899. 

Dispute (Longshoremen): CO. appointed, 310; 

CB. appointed, 800; CB. fully constituted, 

1017; CB. report, 1017; settlement after strike 

action, 1115. 



IIIAXX 



INDEX 



Shoe Workers of America, United 

Affiliation with CLC, 961. 
Shops See Factories 

Silicosis 
Man. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 782. 
Que. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 782. 
Skilled Manpower See Training 
Smith Transport Limited 
Dispute (Teamsters): C.B. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Social Security 

CLC views, 15. 

ILO Committee of Experts on Social Security, 
meeting, 140. 

McGregor, James, Director of Unemployment 
Insurance, UIC, appointment as vice-chair- 
man, International Social Security Associa- 
tion, 960. 

Stanrock Uranium Mines Limited 

Dispute (Steelworkers) : CO. appointed, 310; 
C.B. appointed, 800; settlement, 1017. 

Starr, Hon. Michael, Federal Minister of Labour 
Comments, statements, etc. — 
CLC brief, reply, 16. 
CNTU brief, reply, 18. 

National Advisory Committee on Tech- 
nological Education, 209. 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 21. 

Stationary Engineers 

N.B. Stationary Engineers Act: amendment, 
1088. 

Steelworkers of America, United 
Certification applications: 

Arnaud Railway, Pointe Noire, Que. (Pickands 
Mather and Company) : 799; withdrawn, 
898. 
Pickands Mather and Company (Arnaud 
Railway, Pointe Noire, Que.): 799; with- 
drawn, 898. 
Pickands Mather and Company (Wabush 
Lake Railway Company Limited): 799; 
withdrawn, 898. 
Wabush Lake Railway Company Limited 
(Pickands Mather and Company): 799; 
withdrawn, 898. 
Disputes: 

Denison Mines Limited (District 6) : CO. 
appointed, 899; C.B. appointed, 1115; C.B. 
fully constituted, 1115. 
Denison Mines Limited (Local 5980): CO. 

appointed, 1115. 
Stanrock Uranium Mines Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 310; C.B. appointed, 800; settle- 
ment, 1017. 
Inter-union raiding ban, resolution rejected, 
Steelworkers — Mine, Mill and Smelter Work- 
ers, 549. 
Kaiser Steel Corporation — Steelworkers agree- 
ment — sharing of savings in production costs, 
job security provisions, incentive pay. UNITED 
STATES: 6. 



Milling, Gordon, Canadian Research Depart- 
ment, appointed to Pension Commission of 
Ontario, 657. 

National policy conference, 549. 

"Sabbaticals" but no wage increase, new labour 
contracts, Steelworkers and 11 steel companies. 
UNITED STATES: 549. 

Sefton, William Henry, staff member, death of, 
961. 

Waisglass, Harry, Canadian Director, assign- 
ment to Labour Research Unit, ILO, Singa- 
pore, 1089. 

Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach 

Employees of America, Amalgamated 

Association of 
Disputes: 

Hull City Transport Limited: CO. appointed, 
49; C.B. appointed, 49; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 227; C.B. report, 900; settlement, 
899. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited: CO. 
appointed, 49; C.B. appointed, 49; C.B. 
fully constituted, 227; C.B. report, 900; 
settlement, 899. 

Stanrock Uranium Mines Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 310. 
Income continuance plan — B.C. Hydro and 

Power Authority and Street Railwaymen, 311. 

Strdces and Lockouts See also Industrial Re- 
lations 

B.C. Supreme Court enjoins strike because some 
of unions jointly certified failed to comply 
with provisions of Act, 400. 

CLC views on right to strike, 14. 

N.S. Supreme Court (Appeal Side) confirms 
granting of injunction and damages for en- 
gaging in an unlawful strike and picketing, 
506. 

Statistics: "G-Strikes and Lockouts" (monthly 
feature) 

Strike-breaking legislation to prohibit or regu- 
late. UNITED STATES: 311. 

Students 

Directory of Canadians Studying in the United 
States, 1963-64, federal Department of Labour, 
1031. 

Syndicate of Employees of Station CHRL 
Application for revocation of certification: 
Radio Roberval Inc.: 601; granted, 798 



Taggart Employees' Association 
Certification applications: 

Inaerco Limited, 48; rejected, 142. 
Taggart Service Limited, 48; rejected, 142. 

Taggart Service Limited 

Certification application (Taggart Employees' 
Association) : 48; rejected, 142. 

Taxation 
CCC, views, 111. 
Railway Brotherhoods, recommendations, 20. 



INDEX 



XXIX 



Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 

Helpers of America, International 

Brotherhood of 
Certification applications: 

Aero Caterers Limited: 693; representation 
vote, 798; granted, 897. 

Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc.: 799; repre- 
sentation vote, 897; granted, 1014. 

Bray, John L.: 1016; representation vote, 1109. 

Dominion Auto Carriers, Limited: 504; 
granted, 692. 

Dominion Auto Transit Company Limited: 
390; granted, 692. 

Empire Freightways Limited: 226; rejected, 
389; request for review of decision, 504; 
denied, 503. 

Flanders Van Service Limited: 389; with- 
drawn, 694. 

Hubert Transport Inc.: 898; representation 
vote, 1109. 

Motorways (Ontario) Limited: 143; granted, 
225. 

Pacific Inland Express Limited: granted, 47. 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited: (Local 
31): 694; 897; withdrawn, 898; rejected, 
1014; 1015. 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited: (Local 
181): 694; 897; withdrawn, 898; rejected, 
1014; 1015. 

Roberval Express Limited: 309; rejected, 502. 

Rod Service (Ottawa) Limited (mail truck 
drivers): 48; granted, 142. 

Rod Service (Ottawa) Limited (mechanics, 
garage employees): 1016; granted, 1109. 

St. Lawrence Rendering Company Limited: 
504; rejected, 692. 

Tiger Transfer Limited: application for revoca- 
tion, 1110. 

Vancouver Alberta Freightlines Limited: 1015; 
representation vote, 1014; rejected, 1109. 

Wilkins Transport Limited: 309; granted, 
'389. 

Windsor Truck and Storage Company 
Limited: representation vote, 225; 226; 
rejected, 389. 
Disputes : 

Brocklesby, John N. Transport Limited: 
settlement, 227. 

Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited: CO. 
appointed, 505; settlement, 603. 

Canadian Transit Company: CO. appointed, 
49; CB. appointed, 311; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 505; CB. report, 801; settlement, 
800. 

De Luxe Transportation Limited: settlement, 
396. 

Dominion Auto Carriers Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 694. 

Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited: settlement, 
396. 

Hanson Transport Company Limited: CB. 
report, 50; settlement, 49. 

Hill The Mover (Canada) Limited: employees 
at Ottawa and Toronto Terminals: settle- 
ment, 49. 

Inter-City Truck Lines Limited: CB. report, 
50; settlement, 49. 



Walter Little Limited: CB. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau: 
CB. report, 50; settlement, 49. 

Motorways Limited: CB. report, 50; settle- 
ment, 49. 

Overland Express Limited: CB. report, 50; 
settlement, 49. 

Rod Service (Ottawa) Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 396; settlement, 505. 

Smith Transport Limited: CB. report, 50; 
settlement, 49. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Roberval Express Limited: granted, 502. 

Teamwork in Industry (monthly feature) 

Technical and Vocational Training See Train- 
ing 

Technical Employees See Professional Man- 
power 

Technical Training See Training 
Technicians See also Professional Manpower 

Shortage. CANADA: 548. 
Technological Change See Automation 

Technological Education 

National Advisory Committee on Technological 
Education: 190; meeting, 2nd, 208; meeting, 
3d, 1077. 

Technology 

Institute of Technology Administrators, first 
national conference. CANADA: 967. 

Institutes of Technology, Full-time Day Enrol- 
ment as of October 1963, report, DBS, 1079. 

Seven graduates, Canadian institutes of tech- 
nology, study in German industry, 456. 

Termination of Employment 

ILO Recommendation Concerning Termination 
of Employment at Initiative of Employer, 689. 

Textile Industry 

ILO Textiles Committee, Session, 7th, 499. 

Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Pic- 
ture Machine Operators of the United 
States and Canada, International Alliance 
of 
Certification application: 
Baton Broadcasting Limited: request for re- 
view, 694; granted, 798. 
Intervener, certification application: 

V.T.R. Productions Limited: granted, 798. 

Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited 

Certification application (Longshoremen) : 693; 
granted, 798. 

Tiger Transfer Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters) : applica- 
tion for revocation, 1110. 

Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited 

Application for revocation of certification (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers) : 
granted, 142; 143. 



XXX 



INDEX 



Toronto Harbour Commissioners 

Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1842): CO. 

appointed, 309. 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1869) : CO. 

appointed, 1115. 

Trade 

CCC, views, 22. 

International trade, session, CCC, 991. 

Trade and Commerce, Department of 

Hees, Hon. George, Minister, year-end economic 
review (1962), 4. 

Trade Training See Training 
Trade Unions See Labour Unions 
Trades Union Congress (Great Britain) 

Meeting, 95th, 993. 

Roberts, Sir Alfred, CBE, former chairman, 
death of, 1070. 

Tradesmen's Qualification See Apprenticeship 

Training See also Apprenticeship 

Automation and technological change, Railway 
Brotherhoods, views, 20. 

CCC, recommendations, 22. 

Federal aid to school construction projects under 
Technical and Vocational Training Assistance 
Act modified, 192. 

Federal-provincial Deputy Ministers' Conference 
on Manpower Development and Training, 964. 

Industrial establishments, training programs. 
CANADA: 966. 

International Centre for Advanced Training in 
Turin, established by ILO, 307. 

Manpower Consultative Service, establishment, 
federal Department of Labour, 999. 

Manpower Development and Training Act. 
UNITED STATES: 280. 

More federal aid for vocational schools urged, 
Standing Committee of Ministers of Educa- 
tion, Canadian Education Association, 969. 

National and Vocational Training Advisory 
Council, meeting, 557. 

National Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee, 190; 20th anniversary, 361. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 190; meeting, 9; 20th an- 
niversary, 361. 

Older worker employment and training incentive 
program. CANADA: 791; regulations, 1102. 

Ontario General Contractors Association, 
recommendations, 1079. 

Skill development classes to upgrade employed 
persons, "Leaside program". ONTARIO: 108. 

Skilled Manpower Training Research Program, 
federal Department of Labour, 274. 

Technical and Vocational Training branch, co- 
ordinates movement seven graduates, Canadian 
institutes of technology for study in German 
industry, 456. 

Technicians, shortage of. CANADA: 548. 

Training high school drop-outs. UNITED 
STATES: 5. 

Training in industry plan. BRITAIN: 238. 

Training unemployed, National Technical and 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, report, 
1077. 



Transition from School to Work, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 112. 

Vocational and Technical Training for Girls, 
federal Department of Labour, 108. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines 

Application for revocation of certification (Ma- 
chinists): 48; representation vote, 142; 
granted, 225. 

Dispute (Machinists): CO. appointed, 800; 
CB. appointed, 899; CB. fully constituted, 
1016. 

Transair Limited 

Certification application (Flight Attendants): 

granted, 47. 
Certification application (Machinists): request 

for review withdrawn, 226. 
Dispute (Air Line Pilots) : CO. appointed, 227; 

settlement, 310. 
Dispute (Flight Attendants) : CO. appointed, 

1016. 
Dispute (Machinists) : CO. appointed, 396; 

settlement, 695. 

Transfer Payments 

CNTU, views, 17. 
Transportation 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, national trans- 
portation policy, 20. 

Trimble and Sons Limited, H.M. 

Certification application (Transport Drivers) : 
1015; rejected, 1109. 

Twin City Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
application for revocation, 390; granted, 502. 



U 



Unemployment See also Training 
Automation and unemployment, U.S. President's 

Council of Economic Advisers, 1070. 
Manpower Consultative Service, establishment, 

federal Department of Labour, 999. 
Statistics: "A-Labour Force" (monthly feature). 
Substantial decline, 1962. CANADA: 115. 
Training of unemployed — Federal-provincial 

Deputy Ministers' Conference on Manpower 

Development and Training, 965. 
Winter unemployment, aid to 45 areas. 

CANADA: 958. 
World Labour Situation, 1962, ILO Survey, 117, 

118. 

Unemployment Insurance 

Statistics: "E-Unemployment Insurance" (month- 
ly feature). 

Unemployment Insurance Fund (monthly 
feature). 

Unemployment Insurance Act 
Appeals to Umpire in 1962, 192. 
Decisions of Umpire — 
CUB 2072, 69 
CUB 2076, 70 
CUB 2078, 157 
CUB 2085, 158 
CUB 2093, 241 



INDEX 



XXXI 



CUB 2103, 


324 


CUB 2105, 


242 


CUB 2111, 


325 


CUB 2112, 


407 


CUB 2125, 


409 


CUB 2136, 


512 


CUB 2138, 


513 


CUB 2165, 


729 


CUB 2168, 


731 


CUB 2171, 


825 


CUB 2184, 


827 


CUB 2219, 


919 


CUB 2224, 


920 


CUB 2227, 


1028 


CUB 2232, 


1030 


CUB 2248, 


1128 


CUB 2249, 


1129 



Operation of (monthly report) 

Report of (Gill) Committee of Inquiry into 
Unemployment Insurance Act, 119; correc- 
tion, 279. 
Unemployment Insurance Advisory Committee 

Annual report (1963), 878. 

Re, 190. 
Unemployment Insurance Commission 

Desormeaux, M.A., Ernest C, Secretary, retire- 
ment, 5. 

Form to prove availability of application, with- 
drawal, 1070. 

McGregor, James, Director of Unemployment 
Insurance, appointment as vice-chairman, 
International Social Security Association, 960. 

Unfair Labour Practices See Discrimination 

Union Dues 

United States Supreme Court limits union action 
in collecting and using union dues for political 
purposes, 707. 

United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink 
and Distillery Workers of America, Inter- 
national Union of 
Disputes: 

Alberta Wheat Pool: CO. appointed, 49; 

settlement, 227. 
Burrard Terminals Limited: CO. appointed, 

49; settlement, 227. 
Pacific Elevators Limited: CO. appointed, 49; 

settlement, 227. 
Saskatchewan Wheat Pool: CO. appointed, 

49; settlement, 227. 
United Grain Growers Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 49; settlement, 227. 

United Grain Growers Limited 
Dispute (Brewery Workers): CO. appointed, 
49; settlement, 227. 

United Nations 

Subcommission on Prevention of Discrimina- 
tion and the Protection of Minorities, 985. 

United Nations Commission on Human Rights 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights 
drafted by, 977. 

United Nations Commission on the Status of 
Women 
Session, 17th, 674. 



Universal Declaration of Human Rights 

Fifteenth anniversary, 974. 

Human Rights in Canada, 1958-1963, develop- 
ments since 10th anniversary of Universal 
Declaration, 978. 

Universities See Education; Laval Unfversity; 
McGill University; University of Mont- 
real; University of Saskatchewan; Uni- 
versity Research Grants. 

University of Montreal 
Labour-management seminar sponsored by Na- 
tional Productivity Council, 457. 

University of Saskatchewan 
Labour-management-university seminar at Sas- 
katoon (3rd), 193. 

University Research Grants 
Labour Department — University Research 
Grants. CANADA: 1951-1961, 358; 1962, 276. 



Vacations 

"Sabbaticals" but no wage increase, new labour 
contracts, Steelworkers and 11 steel com- 
panies. UNITED STATES: 549. 

Vacation pay paid direct to seamen, not to 
SIU. CANADA: 960. 

Vacations with Pay, 1951-61: Examination of 
Vacation Practices in Canadian Industries, 
Report No. 4, federal Department of Labour, 
553. 

Vancouver Alberta Freightlines Limited 
Certification application (Teamsters): 1015; 
representation vote, 1014; rejected, 1109. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited 
Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 
Workers) : settlement, 145. 

Vancouver Hotel Company Limited 

Dispute (Electrical Workers) : CO. appointed, 

602; settlement, 899. 
Dispute (Machinists) : CO. appointed, 602; 

settlement, 899. 
Dispute (Operating Engineers): CO. appointed, 

602; settlement, 899. 
Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 

Workers): settlement, 311. 

Vancouver Wharves Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen and Warehousemen) 
CO. appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 396 
CB. fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, 695 
settlement, 899. 

Vancouver Tug Boat Company Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers): 1110. 
Vehicles See Public Service 
Viking Tugboat Company Limited 

Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 
Workers) : settlement, 145. 
Vocational Education 

Vocational Education and Federal Policy. 
UNITED STATES: 487. 



xxxn 



INDEX 



Vocational Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 
Vocational Training See Training 
Vocational Training Advisory Council See Na- 
tional Technical and Vocational Training 

Advisory Council 
Voice of the East, Limited (Radio Station 

CHEF) 
Certification application (National Syndicate of 

the Employees of The Voice of the East): 

601; granted, 692. 
Dispute (National Syndicate of Employees of 

The Voice of the East): CO. appointed, 899; 

settlement, 1115. 

V.T.R. Productions Limited 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
693; granted, 798. 

Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees, intervener): granted, 798. 



W 



Wabash Lake Railway Company Limited 

Certification application (Steelworkers) : 799; 
withdrawn, 898. 

Wage Protection 

Ont. Public Works Creditors Payment Act, 
1962-63, provisions, 1081. 

Wages and Salaries 

Agreement, Sabo Machine and Tool Works, 
Inc. and Auto Workers, annual salary for 
plant workers (production and maintenance). 
UNITED STATES: 7. 

Annual Earnings in the Scientific and Technical 
Professions, 1962, federal Department of 
Labour, 548. 

Average weekly wages increase, 1962. 
CANADA: 116. 

B.C. Payment of Wages Act: regulation, 321. 

Building trades wage rates advance 1963. 
UNITED STATES: 505. 

Financial Administration Act. CANADA: regu- 
lations, 612. 

Income continuance plan — B.C. Hydro and 
Power Authority and Street Railwaymen, 311. 

Median wage increase. UNITED STATES: 
1962, 277; first quarter 1962, 384. 

National Incomes Commission report, agree- 
ments affecting construction industry 
examined. BRITAIN: 550, 865. 

Ont. Wages Act: amendment, 1082. 

"Sabbaticals" but no wage increase, new la- 
bour contracts, Steelworkers and 11 steel 
companies. UNITED STATES: 549. 

Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earnings" 
(monthly feature). 

Wage increases, 1963. UNITED STATES: 786. 

World Labour Situation, 1962, ILO survey, 117, 
118. 

Waisglass, Harry, Canadian Research Director, 
United Steelworkers of America 
Assignment, Labour Research Unit, ILO, 

Singapore, 1089. 
Educational Conference, OFL, remarks, 278. 



Welding 

Alta. Welding Act: regulations, 321. 

Welfare See Public Welfare 
Western Stevedoring Company Limited 

Certification application (Longshoremen and 

Warehousemen) : representation vote, 225; 

granted, 389. 

White-Collar Workers 

Membership, 30 unions. BRITAIN: 279. 
Wilkins Transport' Limited 

Certification application (Teamsters): 309; 
granted, 389. 

Wilson, Peter, J. 

Intervener, certification application: 

Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc.: representa- 
tion vote, 897. 

Windsor Truck and Storage Company Limited 
Certification application (Teamsters) : repre- 
sentation vote, 225; 226; rejected, 389. 

Winter House Building Incenitve Program See 
House Building Incentive Procram 

Winter Unemployment See Unemployment 

Winter Works See Municipal Winter Works 
Incentive Program 

Women in Industry 

"Arts of Management" conference, Business and 
Professional Club, Toronto, 7. 

Careers for women in mathematics. CANADA: 
bibliography prepared by federal Department 
of Labour, 378. 

Economic Commission for Africa, research on 
role of women in urban development, 1071. 

Free world's women unionists, meeting. VIEN- 
NA: 280. 

McLellan, Mrs. Ethel, Director, Women's 
Bureau, Ontario Department of Labour, ap- 
pointment, 917. 

Morley, Miss Eleanor, Co-ordinator of Women's 
Employment, Pacific Region, NES, retirement, 
595. 

Status of Women in the United States, report, 
1103. 

The Woman Worker, 1891. CANADA: 223. 

36 per cent in paid employment. UNITED 
STATES: 411. 

Thirty-third Annual Conference of Representa- 
tives of Unions Catering for Women 
Workers. BRITAIN: 599. 

U.N. Commission on the Status of Women, Ses- 
sion, 17th, 674. 

University enrolment of Canadian women, 37. 

Women Engineers in the U.S.S.R., 1005. 

Women Graduates in Part-time Work, report, 
(with ILO), International Federation of 
University Women, 494. 

Women in High Positions in U.S. Government, 
139. 

Women's Bureau, federal Department of Labour, 
meets trade unionists, 276. 

Women's Bureau, Department of Labour and 
National Service, establishment. AUSTRALIA: 
108. 



INDEX 



xxxm 



Working Mothers and Their Problems. 

CANADA: 305. 
Working women in New Zealand, 895. 

yooDS, Prof. H. D., McGill University 
Director, Industrial Relations Centre, re-ap- 
pointment, 77. 
Vjork Injuries See Accidents, Industrial 
Yorkers' College See Workers' Education. 
Workers' Education 
CNTU's education director serves ILO in 

Central African Republic, 656. 
Labour College of Canada: opened in Montreal, 
554; first course June 1964, 405. 

Forking Conditions See Labour Conditions 
Workmen's Compensation 
Alta. Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 

235, 321. 
B.C. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, new provision, 321. 
Man. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 781. 



N.B. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 781; revised regulations, 1125. 

Ont. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 405, 781; regulations, 154. 

P.E.I. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 781. 

Que. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 781; regulations, 726. 

Workmen's Compensation in Canada, 1962 
edition, 456. 



Yohe, Dr. R. V., President, B. F. Goodrich 
Canada Limited 
Windsor Chamber of Commerce, address, 125. 

Yorkwood Shipping and Trading Company 
Limited 
Dispute (Longshoremen, Local 1654) : CO. 
appointed, 309; C.B. appointed, 311; C.B. 
fully constituted, 397; C.B. report, settlement, 
808. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Han. Michael Starr, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 



R. M. Dyke 



Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 



Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 






Vol. LXIII, No. 1 CONTENTS January 31, 1963 

Requirements for Professional Manpower 2 

50 Years Ago This Month 3 

Notes of Current Interest 4 

National Technical and Vocational Training Advisory Council ... 9 

Labour's Annual Briefs to Government 13 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce Recommendations fo Cabinet. . 21 

Latest Labour Statistics 23 

Manpower Situation, Fourth Quarter, 1962 24 

7th Annual Convention, Quebec Federation of Labour 31 

Industrial Fatalities in Canada during Third Quarter, 1962 33 

Seminar on Vocational Rehabilitation of the Disabled 35 

Preparation for Retirement 36 

University Enrolment of Canadian Women 37 

Collective Bargaining Review: 

Collective Bargaining, Fourth Quarter, 1962 38 

Collective Bargaining Scene 41 

International Labour Organization: 

Tripartite Technical Meeting for Printing Trades 45 

Teamwork in Industry 46 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 47 

Conciliation Proceedings 49 

Railway Board of Adjustment 51 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 57 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 62 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 67 

Monthly Report on NES Operations 68 

Decisions of the Umpire 69 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 74 

Prices and the Cost of Living 78 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 79 

LABOUR STATISTICS 83 



Correspondence — Address letters dealing with editorial matters to the Editor, those dealing with 
subscriptions to the Circulation Manager. Subscriptions — Canada: $3 per year, single copies 
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Circulation Manager. Bound Volumes — $5 per copy delivered in Canada, $7 per copy to other 
countries. Change of Address — Please attach label showing previous address. 

Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 
63569-8—1 



Department of Labour Today 



Requirements for Professional Manpower 

Latest survey of employment of and requirements for scientists and engineers, 
eighth in series, has been completed. Survey is conducted by Department every 
two years as part of its research activities in field of professional manpower 



The Department of Labour has just com- 
pleted its 1962 Survey of Employment and 
Requirements for Engineering and Scien- 
tific Manpower in Canada. 

The survey was the eighth in a series 
of surveys conducted every two years as 
part of the Department's research in the 
field of professional manpower. It is a key 
source of information in evaluating the 
country's current and future requirements 
for professional personnel in the scientific 
and technical field. 

Information obtained through the survey 
is used by industry, universities and govern- 
ments in planning expansion and recruitment 
programs, and by students and vocational 
counsellors in assessing career opportunities 
for engineers and scientists. 

In addition to evaluating future require- 
ments for professional personnel, the survey 
has also been a means of investigating some 
specific characteristics of the hiring and 
employment of engineers and scientists. Two 
past surveys were concerned with the dif- 
ficulties employers were experiencing in 
recruitment of professional staff, the reasons 
for the difficulties, and the effects the result- 
ing shortages were having on the establish- 
ment's operations. 

Another survey considered in-plant or 
company-sponsored training programs; an- 
other, the sources from which employers 
hired their engineers and scientists, whether 
from the supply of new graduates, of per- 
sons with considerable work experience in 
their professional field, or of recent immi- 
grants. 

The extent of upgrading of personnel 
from the sub-professional to the profes- 
sional level was also considered in one of 
the earlier surveys. 

The 1962 survey asked employers to 
specify the types of engineering and scien- 
tific functions in which their professional 
personnel were engaged. There was also a 
question on the qualifications of persons 
performing engineering and scientific work, 
and another on the rate of employment 
turnover. 

Originally, the survey coverage included 
only employers in the industrial sector of 
the economy, but in the mid-fifties it was 
extended to include universities and colleges, 
and government agencies. Until the present, 
the coverage of professional fields included 



only those of engineering and natural 
science, but in the current survey coverage 
was extended to three social sciences: 
economics, sociology and statistics. 

The mailing list includes all industrial 
establishments or organizations employing 
more than 100 workers in the following: 
mining and quarrying, manufacturing, trans- 
portation and communication, public utili- 
ties, and finance and insurance. 

The latest survey indicates that employers 
expect a continuance of a fairly stable 
growth in their employment of engineers 
and scientists. They estimate an average 
annual increase of 5.9 per cent in the 
employment of engineers over the two-year 
period to 1964, of 5.4 per cent in the 
employment of natural scientists, and of 
9.1 per cent in the employment of social 
scientists. Estimates of employment over 
the five-year period to 1967 indicate an 
expected total gain in the employment of 
engineers of 32 per cent; of natural scien- 
tists, of 31 per cent; and of social scientists, 
88 per cent. 

The greatest increases in requirements 
for engineers are expected in industrial and 
mechanical engineering, where increases are 
estimated at 11 per cent and 7 per cent 
respectively. In geological, metallurgical and 
mining engineering, less-than-proportionate 
annual gains are anticipated: an annual 
average rise of about 3 per cent in each. 

The greatest increase in estimated require- 
ments in the natural sciences, 11 per cent 
annually, is in mathematics; the lowest, 3 
per cent, in agriculture, forestry and geo- 
logy. 

In social science, estimates of annual 
increases in employment between 1962 and 
1964 are 8 per cent in economics, 10 per 
cent in statistics, and 13 per cent in socio- 
logy. 

Twenty-seven per cent of all establish- 
ments responding in the survey reported 
vacant engineering or scientific positions. 
Establishments employing engineers reported 
vacancies amounting to 6 per cent of the 
total established engineering positions. Va- 
cancies in establishments employing natural 
scientists amounted to 6 per cent also, and 
in establishments employing social scien- 
tists, to 10 per cent. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



From the Labour Gazette, January 1913 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Wholesale prices rise sharply throughout 1912, in Britain and United States as 
well as in Canada. Sweden issues report on country's "Great Strike" ot 1909 



Wholesale prices rose rapidly in Canada 
during 1912, and by December the Depart- 
ment's wholesale price index (1890-99=100) 
stood at 135.2, compared with 129.4 a year 
earlier. 

The Labour Gazette of January 1913 
reported that the index had risen to 134 
in February and March, and advanced a 
point in each of the three following months, 
reaching 137 in June, compared with 126.1 
a year before. During the next three months 
it dropped, so that by September the index 
was down to 132.5. After that, another 
rise brought the index to the December 
figure already mentioned. 

Index numbers of prices in Great Britain 
and the United States showed similar move- 
ments, the Gazette said, "exceeding all 
previous high records." It added that "the 
chief factors in this general rise of prices 
were the crop conditions of 1911, the severe 
winter which followed, and the industrial 
expansion of the present year, accompany- 
ing the prospects of good crops and their 
final realization. The year was marked by 
an expansion of trade, financial activity, 
a great increase in the supply of gold, and 
an expansion of credit . . . 

"The period of intense cold which settled 
over the continent in January [following a 
severe drought during the summer of 1911 
in Canada and in Europe] and continued 
with little abatement till late spring, with 
heavy snowfalls and frequent storms, inten- 
sified the price situation." 

The severe weather caused a fall in the 
production of dairy produce, and supplies 
of most foods in storage proved inadequate. 
"Butter, eggs, and potatoes were imported 
extensively for some weeks, New Zealand 
butter being brought from England, and 
potatoes from Ireland for consumption in 
Ontario." 

Sweden's General Strike 

The Labour Gazette published an article 
on Sweden's General Strike, or "Great 
Strike," in 1909, on which a report had 
shortly before been issued by the Swedish 
Government. 

The article shows that labour-manage- 
ment relations in Sweden 50 years ago were 
not as harmonious as those today, which 
are held up as a model to be emulated 
(see box, p. 1262, L.G., Nov. 1962). 

The General Federation of Labour of 
Sweden, the article said, was organized 



in 1898, and by the beginning of 1909 
the total membership of syndicates "with 
socialistic tendencies" was 200,000. In addi- 
tion, 15,000 workers belonged to other 
organizations not connected with socialism, 
the total making up about 50 per cent of 
the men belonging to trades to which the 
syndicate idea had been applied. 

After this labour organization had been 
set up, Swedish employers began to find 
themselves at a disadvantage in dealing 
with their employees; and after a number 
of unsuccessful attempts, they founded the 
Syndicate of Swedish Employers. 

At first, the Syndicate was a "purely 
defensive organization," with an insurance 
against strikes, whose aim was "to ensure 
the participant members labour at low and 
uniform rates." As the organization grew 
in strength and in numbers, however, it 
began to apply itself "to regulating the 
conditions of labour in the interest of the 
employers by means of collective con- 
tracts." 

During 1905, the employers' organization 
introduced new provisions into its statutes, 
which required its members, before signing 
a collective agreement with a labour organi- 
zation, to submit it to the Syndicate's 
executive for approval. 

By the end of 1909, there were 2,416 
such contracts in force, covering 11,000 
employers and 325,000 employees. To quote 
from the Labour Gazette, "Such was the 
respective strength of the parties when, 
after various rather unimportant disputes, 
the great struggle broke out." Wages appear 
to have been the main immediate issue in 
the dispute. 

The men were in a weak position from 
the outset. Some of them had broken their 
contracts in quitting work, and on this 
account the Government refused to inter- 
vene, saying that "the breaches of contract 
and other similar measures had transformed 
the strike into an attack against society 
itself." The men also lacked funds with 
which to carry on the fight. 

An agreement was reached to return to 
work on September 5, but the strike con- 
tinued sporadically until early in November. 
The result was inconclusive, "the parties 
being [un]able to come to an agreement as 
to the future relations between their respec- 
tive organizations." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 

63569-8— 1J 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 

Trade and Commerce Minister Foresees Strong Gains 



In his year-end review of Canada's 
economy, Hon. George Hees, Minister of 
Trade and Commerce, said 1962 was "a 
year of strong advance." 

Assessing the outlook for 1963 he said 
"the further penetration of markets arising 
from the new competitive strength of Cana- 
dian producers should provide a major 
source of stimulus in the coming year." 

Among the advances made in 1962, the 
Minister noted the following: 

Canada's gross national product in- 
creased by 8 per cent over last year, with 
national output in real terms rising by 7 
per cent, according to the most recent 
figures. 

— Growth in output — with industrial pro- 
duction up by more than 8 per cent — was 
more pronounced in goods-producing indus- 
tries than in services, and most gains were 
made in the sectors of industry highly 
exposed to foreign competition. 

— In the first 11 months of the year, 
177,000 more persons were employed, on 
average, than in the same period of 1961, 
with the rise in employment exceeding the 
growth in the labour force. 

— A corresponding decrease in unem- 
ployment, which dropped to 5.9 per cent of 
the labour force from 7.2 per cent in 1961 
and 7.0 per cent in 1960. 

— A rise of 8i per cent in total personal 
incomes during the first nine months of 
1962 over the same period in 1961, with 
consumer prices up only 1 per cent. 

— A rise of 9 per cent in merchandise 
exports during the first 10 months, following 
similar increases in 1960 and 1961. 

— Imports in the first 10 months rose 
12 per cent, much of the increase reflecting 
the rise in prices of goods from abroad 
in view of the lower Canadian dollar; this 
indicates that growth of demand in Canada 
was largely met by domestic sources. 

— A substantial build-up in foreign ex- 
change reserves after a sharp drain in the 
first half of 1962. The latter did not inter- 



rupt the rise in economic activity, but gave 
"new impetus to the drive for expanded 
markets and increased production." 

During the year the pegging of the 
Canadian dollar at 921 cents in terms of 
U.S. currency was a central feature of the 
Government's program "designed to speed 
industrial development and in particular to 
strengthen the competitive ability of the 
Canadian producer." 

Provision of more credit facilities for 
export and other purposes, greatly increased 
assistance for technical training, and pro- 
vision of various financial incentives to 
promote research and industrial develop- 
ment were other features of the Govern- 
ment's program. 

The response on the part of Canadian 
producers was vigorous. New gains in both 
the foreign and domestic markets are already 
indicated but should become "increasingly 
apparent in the period ahead." 

Drawing attention to signs of hesitancy 
in some of the major industrial economies 
of the world, and stating there were some 
tendencies toward softening in international 
commodity markets, Mr. Hees added: "Any 
slowing down in the outside world would 
mean that even greater efforts would be 
required if the upward momentum of the 
Canadian economy is to be maintained. 

"There are, however, important elements 
of strength in the domestic market outlook," 
he said. "The financial position of con- 
sumers is unusually strong; inventory-sales 
rations are in a healthy position and busi- 
nessmen seem to be planning for another 
good year." 

A preliminary survey had shown that capi- 
tal investment by business in 1963 might be 
as much as 5 per cent higher than in 1962. 
The above considerations "point to a signifi- 
cant increase in over-all demand in Canada 
in the coming year," the Minister stated. He 
added that, if Canadian producers in addi- 
tion took full advantage of the new oppor- 
tunities, "the Canadian economy should 
move steadily forward." 



Chamber of Commerce President Predicts Active Economy in 1963 



Canadians can look forward to a rela- 
tively high level of economic activity in 
1963, President Victor Oland of The Cana- 
dian Chamber of Commerce said in a year- 
end message. "The basic problem of estab- 
lishing an adequate economic growth rate, 
however, has not been solved," he said. 

Business, said the Chamber President, 
has made advances in most areas compared 
with a year ago. There have been improve- 



ments in gross national product, in export 
trade, in industrial production, wages and 
salaries, and employment. 

Although the exchange crisis had been a 
disturbing development, Canadians could 
take heart in their ability to weather the 
storm as evidenced in the improvement in 
reserves and the gradual removal of import 
surcharges. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



"External forces will not bail us out of 
our difficulties," said Mr. Oland. "We are. 
dependent on our own efforts to compete 
effectively in foreign and domestic markets. 
In this connection, we can be encouraged 
by the forward steps now being taken for 
closer labour-management-government co- 
operation on setting basic goals for Canada." 

In order to stimulate economic growth 
and development, to meet employment 
demands today and tomorrow, immediate 
action is needed in the area of government 
finances and taxation. "The present high 
personal and corporate income tax rates 
discourage initiative and sales and add to 
the costs of manufacturers and to the prices 
we pay as consumers," Mr. Oland said. 



$7J-Billion Construction Program 
Seen by CCA President in 1963 

The President of the Canadian Construc- 
tion Association has predicted a $7.5-billion 
construction program for Canada this year. 

Hugh R. Montgomery said in a year-end 
message: "The construction industry is look- 
ing for a slightly larger program than the 
$7.4-billion program estimated to have been 
achieved in 1962. It will therefore keep 
its position as Canada's largest industry and 
employer. The equivalent of 570,000 year- 
round jobs on-site are required to carry out 
this program, plus an even larger work 
force off-site to produce, sell and transport 
the necessary construction materials and 
equipment." 

Rate of Expansion Declines 

The CCA President pointed out that be- 
cause the construction industry was largely 
a service industry, constructing facilities for 
the use of others, its annual volume reflected 
the state of the country's economic well- 
being and development. The rate of eco- 
nomic expansion in Canada, as reflected 
by the volume of construction, had levelled 
off since 1957 and, on a per capita basis, 
was actually declining, he said. 

The amount of industrial construction has 
dropped a good deal. "This is very serious, 
since it is through an expansion in this 
category that there lies the main scope for 
Canada to compete successfully in home 
and foreign markets and to provide addi- 
tional continuing employment," Mr. Mont- 
gomery said. 

The CCA President looked for further 
improvements in labour-management rela- 
tions in the construction industry during 
1963. "Both bodies are coming to realize 
more and more that they are interdependent 
and that the public interest is also best 
served by a mature approach to what has 
often traditionally been considered as an 



area of almost total conflict — as a matter 
of principle. There will always be arguments 
and disagreements but there are many areas 
in which management and labour can 
agree. We should all try to expand these 
areas of agreement and strive to achieve 
our many common goals." 



Prince Edward Island Signs 
Apprenticeship Agreement 

Prince Edward Island has signed a federal- 
provincial Apprenticeship Training Agree- 
ment, it was announced jointly last month 
by Hon. Michael Starr, federal Minister of 
Labour, and Hon. Henry W. Wedge, Minis- 
ter of Welfare and Labour for Prince 
Edward Island. 

The new agreement brings to nine the 
number of provinces participating directly 
in the federal-provincial apprenticeship 
agreements. Although the Province of 
Quebec has not signed the apprenticeship 
agreement, some of the costs of apprentice- 
ship in that province are shared by the 
federal Government under the Technical 
and Vocational Training Assistance Act. 

Under the agreement, the federal govern- 
ment agrees to share 50 per cent of provin- 
cial expenditures on apprenticeship training 
carried out in co-operation with industry. 

The number of registered apprentices in 
the participating provinces has increased 
from nearly 9,500 in 1950 to more than 
29,000 (including Quebec trainees) in June 
1962. These figures do not include appren- 
tices trained by private industry. 



First Secretary of UIC, 
E.C. Desormeaux Retires 

Ernest C. Desormeaux, M.A., Secretary 
of the Unemployment Insurance Commis- 
sion since 1941, retired on December 7. 
He had served under five Chief Commis- 
sioners, and had been the only permanent 
Secretary of the Commission since it was 
established. 

Mr. Desormeaux, before going to the 
UIC, spent 20 years as business adminis- 
trator for the Ottawa Separate School 
Board, and before that he taught at Sacre 
Coeur Separate School in Ottawa for three 
years. 



U.S. Panel Recommends Program 
To Train High School Drop-outs 

A $400,000,000 United States federal 
program to help in training high school 
students and school drop-outs, and retrain- 
ing adults, was recommended to President 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Kennedy last month by a 25-member panel 
of consultants on vocational education 
appointed a year ago by the Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare. 

The consultants recommended that $390,- 
000,000 of the proposed federal expenditure 
should be matched by states and localities 
dollar for dollar. The remaining $10,000,000 
would be supplemented by $5,000,000 from 
the other sources, and would be used to 
set up a new vocational training program 
for high school students who have handicaps 
that prevent them from taking the regular 
vocational courses. 



High School Diploma Has Become 
Minimum Requirement for Job 

A high school diploma has become a 
minimum requirement in the hiring policies 
of many industries in many parts of the 
United States, according to William Haber, 
an economist of the University of Michigan. 

The result of this policy, he said, is that 
two groups of "uneducated" people, one 
at each end of the age scale, are swelling 
the ranks of the hard core of unemployed 
persons. The two groups are the young 
high school "drop-outs" and the older 
people who got their schooling before the 
high school diploma came to be considered 
important. 

Referring to the older people, Mr. Haber 
said: "They are turning loose people with 
10 earning years left to them, before they 
are eligible for social security, with little 
chance of finding other jobs in industry." 

The reasoning used to justify the insist- 
ence on the possession of a high school 
diploma by applicants for employment is 
that workers must be able to acquire new 
skills or master new machines, and they 
cannot do this if they lack general learning 
ability. "To the personnel man, the high 
school diploma is an indication that the 
worker possesses these abilities. It also gives 
him hope that he can be promoted to 
supervisor some day," Mr. Haber said. 

Even those who believe that the high 
school diploma has become a fetish are 
likely to favour the high school graduate 
over the drop-out because "the drop-out is 
a quitter." 

Steel workers, Kaiser Steel Agree 
On Sharing of Cost Savings 

Sharing of savings in production costs, 
job security provisions, and widespread 
adjustments in incentive pay are features 
of a unique agreement between Kaiser Steel 



Corporation and the United Steelworkers 
announced last month. 

The contract, which is the outcome of 
nearly three years of study by a tripartite 
committee set up at the end of the steel 
strike in 1959, has yet to be ratified by the 
7,000 employees affected. 

If ratified, it will give the employees 
each month, in wages and fringe benefits, 
32i per cent of any savings effected in the 
use of materials, supplies and labour. The 
company would retain the other 67i per 
cent. The sharing ratio reflects the past 
proportion between labour costs and total 
manufacturing costs. 

Unlike the American Motors-UAW agree- 
ment (L.G. 1961, p. .1092), the Kaiser 
proposal is based on the production costs 
of finished steel, not on company profits. 

Protection for the employees against 
unemployment caused by technological 
change is to be provided by the establish- 
ment of a plant-wide employment pool, 
and through the maintenance of wage rates, 
although the company retains the right to 
make layoffs necessitated by lack of busi- 
ness. 

It is also proposed to eliminate incentive 
pay, which now applies to about 60 per cent 
of the employees, by allowing the workers 
to transfer to the savings-sharing plan. 



Membership of U.K. Unions 
Increases to 9.8 Million 

The total membership of trade unions 
in the United Kingdom at the end of 1961 
was about 9,883,000, which was 62,000, 
or 0.6 per cent, more than the total of a 
year earlier, according to an article, "Mem- 
bership of Trade Unions in 1961," in the 
November issue of the Ministry of Labour 
Gazette. 

The total number of unions at the end 
of 1961 was 635, compared with 654 at 
the end of 1960. 

(Comparable Canadian statistics (L.G., 
Nov. 1962, p. 1237) show that at the 
beginning of 1962 the total membership 
of trade unions in Canada was 1,423,000 
and the number of unions, 159.) 

The number of males who belonged to 
trade unions in the United Kingdom at 
the end of 1961 was 7,898,000, an increase 
of 23,000, or 0.3 per cent, compared with 
the previous year; the number of females 
was 1,985,000, an increase of 39,000, or 
2.0 psr cent. 

By industry, the main increases were in 
educational services, 31,900; local govern- 
ment service, 26,700; metal and engineering 
industries, 16,700; and other transport and 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



communications, 15,200. These increases 
were partly offset by decreases in coal 
mining, 20,900, and railways, 19,000. 



Business Done by Canadian Co-ops 
Increases 5 Per Cent in Year 

The total business done by all types of 
co-operatives in Canada reporting for the 
crop year ended July 31, 1961 was $1,470,- 
000,000, an increase of 5 per cent over 
1960, according to the annual summary 
Co-operation In Canada, 1961, published 
by the Canada Department of Agriculture. 

There was a slight decrease in the number 
of co-ops but an increase of about 18,000 
in membership. 

The number of known marketing and 
purchasing associations declined from 2,093 
in 1960 to 2,028 in 1961, but the total num- 
ber of shareholders and members was almost 
unchanged at 1,626,766. 

Marketing and purchasing activities in 
Canada increased by 28 per cent from 
$1,112,000,000 in 1951-52 to $1,424,000,000 
in 1960-61. Sales of farm products increased 
by $178,000,000, or 21 per cent, during the 
period; sales of supplies and merchandise 
increased by $153,000,000, or 65 per cent. 



Credit Unions Grow in Number, 
Membership and Assets 

The total number of credit unions in 
Canada reached 4,697 in 1961, an increase 
of 89 during the year, says the annual 
report, Credit Unions in Canada, 1961, 
published by the Canada Department of 
Agriculture. Most of this growth took place 
in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. 

Assets passed the $1.5-billion mark. 

Total membership in 1961 was reported 
to be 2,751,059, an increase of 8 per cent 
over the 1960 figure. Half the total mem- 
bership of all credit unions in Canada is 
in the province of Quebec. 

Members' savings, which are the sum 
of shares and deposits, amounted to $1,387,- 
000,000 in 1961, an increase of 15 per 
cent over those of 1960. Assets per member 
for the whole country increased from $511 
in 1960 to $549 in 1961. 

Loans by credit unions increased by 18 
per cent to $570,000,000 in 1961. During 
the period 1957-61, credit unions made 
loans amounting to $2,259,000,000, which 
was 55 per cent of all loans granted since 
inception. 



Business and Professional Women 
Plan Conference on Management 

An "Arts of Management" conference 
for women business executives, sponsored 
by the Business and Professional Club of 
Toronto, will be held March 15 to 23. A 
similar conference was held last year as an 
experiment. 

The program will include study and dis- 
cussion of the major management functions: 
organization, corporate structure, finance, 
production, industrial relations, ethics and 
policy, administration, marketing and com- 
munication. 

Fifty applicants will be accepted. To be 
eligible a candidate must have had at least 
five years experience in business and should 
be in a supervisory position. She also must 
have the recommendation and approval of 
her management. Experience and ability, 
in so far as they can be judged, will be the 
criteria of selection rather than the degree 
of formal education the candidate has had. 

The faculty of the Conference will include 
men and women from business, finance, 
industry, the labour movement and govern- 
ment. 



Annual Salary for Plant Workers 
Provided in UAW Agreement 

A collective agreement that puts produc- 
tion and maintenance workers on an annual 
salary was recently signed by Sabo Machine 
and Tool Works, Inc., Buffalo, N.Y., and 
Local 55, United Automobile Workers. A 
UAW spokesman said the contract is the 
first of its kind in which his union is 
involved, and AFL-CIO sources in Washing- 
ton say that it is believed to be the first 
negotiated by any union. 

Under the three-year agreement, the 25 
workers covered will be paid salaries rang- 
ing from $6,240 for skilled workers to 
$5,760 for those with limited skill and 
$5,510 for unskilled employees. 

The contract reduces the working hours 
to 7i a day and 37i a week, and provides 
for vacations with pay varying from one 
week after 90 days service to four weeks 
after 20 years, full salary at the rate of 
one month's pay for each year of service 
for a worker who is laid off, severance pay 
for a worker who is discharged of one 
week's salary for each year of service, and 
sick leave of up to three months with full 
pay. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



In Parliament Last Month 



(page numbers refer to Hansard) 

The Bill to establish a National Economic 
Development Board was given first reading 
last month, and the Bill to establish an 
Atlantic Development Board passed second 
and third readings. 

The House considered in committee a 
resolution preceding the introduction of a 
measure to amend the National Productivity 
Council Act to provide for the appointment 
of three additional members to the Council 
but the resolution did not come to a vote. 

Motion for second reading of a private 
member's bill to amend the Merchant Sea- 
men Compensation Act was not put to a 
vote before expiry of the time allotted to 
private members' business. Another private 
member's bill of interest to labour was 
introduced and given first reading. 

Three private members' motions were 
made but did not come to a vote. One 
attempted to bring seasonal farm labourers 
under the coverage of the Unemployment 
Insurance Act, the second to enact a Full 
Employment Act, and the third to encourage 
early vesting of workers' pension rights. 

On November 27, the Minister of Finance 
moved consideration in committee of a 
resolution preceding the introduction of a 
measure to establish a National Economic 
Development Board, to define its duties and 
to provide for the necessary arrangements 
in connection with it (p. 2073). The next 
day, after the resolution was concurred in, 
Bill C-87, to provide for the establishment 
of the Board, was introduced and given 
first reading (p. 2115). The debate on 
second reading of the Bill continued inter- 
mittently during the month of December. 

On December 4, Bill C-94, to provide 
for the establishment of an Atlantic De- 
velopment Board, to define its duties and to 
provide for the necessary arrangements 
relating to it, was introduced by the Minis- 
ter of National Revenue and given first 
reading (p. 2319). Earlier in the day the 
resolution preceding introduction of the 
Bill was considered in committee (p. 2288). 
On December 6, the Bill passed second 
reading (p. 2413), and on December 12, 
after a division on a ruling by the Speaker, 
it was read the third time and passed (p. 
2589). 

On December 4, the House considered 
in committee the resolution preceding the 
introduction of the Bill to amend the 
National Productivity Council Act (p. 2319). 
The initial motion to consider the resolution 
in committee had been agreed to on Novem- 
ber 19 (p. 1745) (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 
1335). 



On December 7, a motion was made for 
second reading of Bill C-25, a private mem- 
ber's bill, to amend the Merchant Seamen 
Compensation Act respecting payments to 
orphans of seamen (p. 2458). The hour 
appointed for private members' bills ex- 
pired without question put. 

On November 26, Bill C-85, a private 
member's bill, to limit to 40 a week the 
hours of work for employees in federal 
works, undertakings and business, "in order 
to combat unemployment and automation," 
was introduced and read the first time 
(p. 1985). 

The three motions that did not come 
to a vote before expiry of the time allotted 
for private members' business were: 

— On December 3, a motion that "the 
Government should consider the advisability 
of amending the Unemployment Insurance 
Act so that seasonal farm labourers would 
receive benefits similar to those paid at 
the present time to seasonal fishermen" 
(p. 2255). 

— On December 17, a motion that the 
Government should consider introducing a 
Canada Full Employment Act, which would 
include "a clear-cut recognition by Parlia- 
ment of the importance of full employment 
as a national policy," and which would 
make the federal Government responsible 
for maintaining such a policy (p. 2728). 

— On December 12, a motion that "the 
Government should consider the advisability 
of encouraging early vesting of pension 
rights of employees, by disallowing in whole 
or in part the employer's claims for a 
reduction of the expenses of pensions for 
income tax purposes, where reasonable 
vesting provisions are not adopted" (p. 
2596). 

On November 27, the Prime Minister 
tabled the second volume of the report 
of the Glassco Royal Commission on Gov- 
ernment Organization (p. 2043). On Decem- 
ber 20, the Prime Minister announced that 
arrangements had been made to assemble a 
staff of senior officers of the public service, 
headed by Dr. G. F. Davidson, Deputy 
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, 
to work with Senator McCutcheon in im- 
plementing the recommendations of the 
Royal Commission (p. 2849). 

On December 10, the Minister of Fi- 
nance announced that the Government had 
approved salary revisions for government 
employees comprising the second, third and 
fourth groups in the cyclical salary review 
program, and wage adjustments for prevail- 
ing rate employees, consideration of which 
had been deferred for some months (p. 
2469). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Fourth Meeting, National Technical 

and Vocational Training Advisory Council 

Advisory Council again recommends extension of March 31 deadline for completion 
of training facilities in order to qualify for 75-percent federal contribution 
and seeks federal sharing in cost of operating, maintaining completed schools 



The National Technical and Vocational 
Training Advisory Council has again recom- 
mended extension of the March 31, 1963, 
deadline by which construction of training 
facilities must be completed in order to 
qualify for a 75-per-cent federal contribu- 
tion. The recommendation was made at the 
Council's fourth meeting, held November 
21 and 22 in Ottawa. 

Under the Technical and Vocational 
Training Agreement, the federal contribu- 
tion will be reduced to 50 per cent after 
March 31. 

At its third meeting, in May (L.G., June 
1962, p. 598), the Council had recom- 
mended that applications that had been 
received and approved by September 1, 
1962 be eligible for the larger contribution 
even if the building project was not com- 
pleted by the deadline. 

The Council also asked the Government 
to consider broadening the agreement to 
provide for federal assistance of at least 
50 per cent of the cost of operation and 
maintenance of institutions established under 
the agreement. 

An addition to the agreement to provide 
especially for vocational training in agricul- 
ture was another measure recommended by 
the Council. 

Dr. G. Fred McN ally, former Chancellor 
of the University of Alberta, presided at 
the meeting. 

The Council adopted a report of one of 
its subcommittees that called for, among 
other things, a high level meeting to bring 
about rapid acceleration of the training of 
the unemployed. 

The meeting heard a report on pro- 
grammed learning and received a brief 
from the Canadian Home and School and 
Parent-Teacher Federation. 

A. D. Hales, Parliamentary Secretary to 
the Minister of Labour, in welcoming the 
members of the Council, spoke of the 
important work being done in vocational 
education, by which, he said, people would 
be trained to fill jobs that were going 
begging. 



Deputy Minister of Labour 

George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 
of Labour, told the meeting that the most 
important task now was to develop plans 
for making adequate use of the facilities 
that were coming into operation. 

He pointed out that technical education 
was a part of general education, and referred 
to the need for teamwork between the 
provincial departments of labour and educa- 
tion in promoting technical education. 

The reorganization of the Council recom- 
mended at the last meeting had not been 
acted on as yet, but only because the matter 
required more thought, not because it had 
been shelved. 

He said that, in spite of restrictions, 
establishment of five positions for federal 
training co-ordinators had been approved. 

Report of Training Branch 

The report of the Technical and Voca- 
tional Training Branch presented a resume 
of the progress being made under the 
various programs of the Technical and 
Vocational Training Agreement. It also 
described the action that had been taken 
on the resolutions passed at the last meeting 
of the Council. 

On the recommendation regarding reor- 
ganization of the Council, the Government 
had requested that the matter should remain 
in abeyance for the present, and that former 
members should be re-appointed for a term 
ending December 1, 1963. 

The recommended study of school drop- 
outs had been referred to a research com- 
mittee of the Department of Labour. 

No action had been taken to date on 
the recommended survey and study of 
guidance services in the school systems, and 
available outside the regular school systems, 
in Canada and other selected countries, 
pending the report of a survey of school 
graduates undertaken in 1961. 

D. E. Glendenning of the Vocational 
Training Branch had made a special study 
of programmed learning and had attended 
a special seminar on the subject at Lan- 
sing, Mich. (See below for his report). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

63569-8—2 



• JANUARY 7963 



The special conference to consider tech- 
nical and vocational education in agricul- 
tural or rural communities had been held 
(L.G., Nov. 1962, p. 1241). 

The recommendation that a National Con- 
ference on Vocational and Technical Train- 
ing should be held had not been proceeded 
with owing to pressure of work. The sub- 
committee assigned to study the nature of 
such a conference will make a progress 
report at the May meeting of the Council. 

The report of the Technical and Voca- 
tional Training Branch said that the Govern- 
ment had approved that equipment "which 
is ordered before April 1, 1963 and delivered 
and put in place before October 1, 1963 
shall be eligible for a 75-per-cent reimburse- 
ment. However, no extension beyond March 
31, 1963 was provided for building projects." 

Extension of Deadline 

A special committee appointed during the 
conference to consider the question of the 
deadline for the 75-per-cent federal sharing 
of contsruction costs proposed a resolution 
that was unanimously adopted by the 
Council. 

The resolution recommended to the 
Minister of Labour "that present regulations 
be amended to allow building projects 
approved prior to March 1963, and com- 
pleted March 1964, to qualify for 75-per- 
cent federal financial support, and that the 
regulations governing the purchase of equip- 
ment be amended to allow for 75-per-cent 
federal sharing for the balance of the life 
of the Agreement, which is March 1967." 

The resolution said the Advisory Council 
had the support of the Canadian Federation 
of Home and School, provincial Depart- 
ments of Education and other interested 
organizations in this recommendation. 

Another resolution recommended that, in 
view of the impetus given to the construc- 
tion of buildings for vocational and tech- 
nical education by the federal Government's 
financial assistance, consideration should be 
given to broadening Program I to provide 
federal assistance of at least 50 per cent 
of the cost of operating and maintaining 
these institutions. 

Agricultural Training 

The committee on agricultural training 
recommended that "an additional and sep- 
arate program, Program 10, be added to 
the Technical and Vocational Training 
Agreement to provide solely for training 
in agriculture." 

The proposed program, the committee 
said, would provide for "training in agricul- 
ture at the secondary schools, trade schools 



and technological institutes, in extension 
courses other than university courses, and 
in other special schools that may be re- 
quired to meet the emerging need in this 
field." 

The committee recommended financial 
assistance under the proposed Program 10 
for buildings and equipment, and for opera- 
tional, instructional and administrative costs 
in connection with approved agricultural 
projects and programs. 

A provincial advisory board for agricul- 
tural education, responsible for assessing 
training needs, fostering suitable programs 
and for co-ordinating efforts among organi- 
zations and agencies interested in agricul- 
tural education, would be. a prerequisite for 
support under the agreement, the committee 
recommended. 

The committee further recommended 
that the federal Department of Labour add 
to the Training Branch staff a specialist in 
agricultural education, and that where feas- 
ible, the Training Branch develop analyses 
in important areas of agricultural training. 

The Advisory Council approved the 
recommendation and decided to keep the 
agricultural committee in being for an 
indefinite period. 

Training of Unemployed 

The special committee on training for 
the unemployed recommended: 

— Courses should be standardized in con- 
tent, duration and terminology. 

— In connection with basic training for 
skill development, all applicants should be 
given a chance, instead of insisting on 
"arbitrary entrance requirements based on 
previous formal education." (This would 
"involve elimination on the basis of per- 
formance early in the course," the com- 
mittee said.) 

— In basic training, the main effort 
should be to upgrade the large mass of 
the unemployed at lower levels, rather than 
to concentrate on a smaller number at 
higher levels. 

— More should be done to encourage 
training within industry. 

— Recognition that nearly 90 per cent of 
expected manpower expansion will be in 
the service industries. 

— Courses should be broadened, and 
many new courses offered in "growth" 
occupations. 

— A high level meeting should be arranged 
by the federal Government with the prov- 
inces, employers, and organized labour to 
bring about rapid acceleration in the train- 
ing of the unemployed. 



10 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



In adopting the report, the Advisory 
Council decided to leave its implementation 
and interpretation to the Training Branch, 
and decided to keep this committee also in 
operation. 

Programmed Learning 

D. E. Glendenning of the Technical and 
Vocational Training Branch presented to 
the Council a report on "programmed 
instruction" or "programmed learning." 

"We would do vocational education a 
disservice not to introduce this medium 
experimentally," he said. 

The basis of programmed instruction is 
that a person tends to repeat an experience 
that is rewarding and avoid those that lack 
reward. Programmed instructional materials 
are so designed that the probability of 
success at each step is very high, almost 
guaranteed. 

Mr. Glendenning described this method 
of teaching as one in which knowledge is 
imparted by means of a series of questions, 
a set for each idea to be taught. The first 
question practically tells the answer, and 
each succeeding question makes a greater 
demand on the learner, by gradually elim- 
inating the clues until a test question shows 
that the concept has been learned. 

"We do not know yet what is the best 
way to use programmed instructional ma- 
terials within the total educational pro- 
gram . . . There is a need for carefully 
controlled studies to ascertain exactly where 
programmed instruction can make its most 
valuable contribution," Mr. Glendenning 
said. 

Little information is available about the 
effectiveness of programmed instruction, but 
he cited three companies who have experi- 
mented with it. Eastman Kodak has yet to 
find areas not suited for programming. 
General Telephone Company of California 
found that students using programmed 
instructional materials did as well as or 
better than other students in approximately 
half the time. International Business Ma- 
chines found that those using programmed 
materials saved from 27 to 47 per cent 
of the instructional time with a slight 
increase in average achievement. 

Some of the conclusions offered in Mr. 
Glendenning's paper were: that programmed 
instruction had a place in education, al- 
though its place had not yet been deter- 
mined — it will not replace the teacher; there 
was evidence that this method would be 
more effective in many areas than tradi- 
tional methods; that correspondence courses 
lend themselves well to programming; and 
that studies by industry indicate a con- 
siderable saving of time through the use 
of programmed materials. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 

63569-8— 21 



Some of Mr. Glendenning's recommenda- 
tions were that: a unit on programming 
should be introduced into teacher training 
programs; seminars or short courses in 
programming should be arranged in each 
province or region during the summer of 
1963; a central source of information on 
the subject was needed for the use of 
teachers; a few vocational teachers in each 
province should be urged to experiment 
with the use of programmed materials dur- 
ing the present school year, mathematics 
and science being logical subjects for the 
purpose; and programming of one course 
should be undertaken, in a manner similar 
to that used in preparing a correspondence 
course or a trade analysis. 

Home and School and Parent-Teacher Federation 

A submission from the Canadian Home 
and School and Parent-Teacher Federation, 
in which that organization presented its 
views and expressed some misgivings about 
vocational training in Canada, was read 
to the Council by Mrs. G. A. Garbutt, 
Acting Chairman of the School Life Com- 
mittee of the Association. 

The federal-provincial Technical and 
Vocational Training Agreement, the Federa- 
tion said, seemed to represent a determined 
effort to do something constructive to 
broaden educational opportunities for all 
children, and it therefore deserved the 
support of parents. Nevertheless, the Federa- 
tion expressed doubts about the program 
on a number of grounds. 

The deadline laid down in the Technical 
Training Act had been responsible for 
many of the problems that had arisen. It 
had necessitated hasty action by local 
boards and provincial governments in the 
building and equipping of the schools, had 
impeded the undertaking of a thorough 
survey of vocational training needs, and 
had led to haste in developing curricula 
and training teachers. There was conse- 
quently "a grave danger that in these areas 
the job done will prove to be inadequate," 
the brief said. 

"In our view it is unfortunate that the 
federal Government did not undertake a 
thorough study of the needs and require- 
ments for technical and vocational training 
facilities before providing funds for their 
construction." 

The Federation's brief posed several 
questions, among them the following: What 
steps are being taken to ensure that there 
is a balance between manpower needs and 
numbers of graduates? What is being done 
in the way of job projection surveys? Will 
provision be made for on-the-job training 



11 



for students enrolled in vocational pro- 
grams? Has consideration been given by 
all levels of government to the advisability 
of appointing qualified technical-vocational 
consultants at the national, provincial and 
local levels? Will the new facilities be used 
for retraining and adult education pro- 
grams? Will standards be set so that grad- 
uates will be acceptable to employers, 
unions and apprenticeship boards? 

The brief asserted that there must be 
an expansion of guidance services in the 
schools, and a campaign to convince the 
public that vocational education is not 
meant for second class individuals but 
for those with different abilities and apti- 
tudes. "We suggest that a research study 
be undertaken to determine the reasons 
for the prejudice toward vocational educa- 
tion. If we can find the cause, we may 
also find a way to change these attitudes." 

A. W. Crawford, War Veterans Repre- 
sentative and former Director of the Voca- 
tional Training Branch, expressed surprise 
that the Home and School Association 
seemed to be unaware of how much had 
been done and was being done regarding 
the matters dealt with in the submission. 

The Council passed a resolution recom- 
mending that the Training Branch take 
appropriate means to arrange for a survey 
of guidance measures. 

Training in Industry 

Speaking on experimental projects in 
connection with training in industry, R. H. 
MacCuish, Assistant Director of the Voca- 
tional Training Branch, outlined a pilot 
project in which three firms in Ontario 
were planning to upgrade 10 employees. 



In a six-month course, the employees being 
trained were taken off the job, the firm 
paying half of the cost, and the rest 
being borne by the employees themselves, 
who gave their time. Mr. MacCuish said 
it was hoped that similar pilot programs 
would be undertaken in other provinces. 

He pointed out that the federal Govern- 
ment gave no direct assistance to industry 
in the matter of training, but that all finan- 
cial help was given through the provincial 
governments. 

In discussion, Fraser Fulton, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Industrial and Public Relations, North- 
ern Electric Company, said that automation 
was not a problem for large firms. Em- 
ployees were trained for new jobs as 
required. 

Mr. MacCuish thought, however, that 
automation was having a serious effect on 
the kind of skills required in industry, 
and more people were needed with higher 
educational qualifications and more tech- 
nical training. 

Garnet Page, General Manager and Sec- 
retary, Engineering Institute of Canada, 
remarked that if it were not for automation 
there would be far more unemployment, 
"because we should be out of business." 
Most employers, he said, were taking the 
necessary steps to retrain their employees. 
He admitted, however, that some employees 
had had to be let go, because they could 
not qualify for the new jobs. 

In answer to a question by Max Swerd- 
low, Canadian Labour Congress, Ross Ford, 
Director of the Technical and Vocational 
Training Branch, said that about 30 per 
cent of all industry provided training pro- 
grams. 



NES Says University Graduates Will Exceed 30,000 in 1963 

The number of 1963 graduates from the larger universities and colleges in Canada 
is expected to exceed 30,000, the National Employment Service says in its annual report 
on supply and demand of university graduates. The predicted 1963 graduating class is 
15-per-cent greater than the 26,500 in the 1962 class. 

The increase in graduations in 1963 over 1962 is at a somewhat higher rate than 
the corresponding rise in enrolments. 

Besides covering only the larger universities and colleges, these figures exclude 
graduates of some courses, those obtaining graduate degrees, and those completing degrees 
through part-time study or summer courses. 

"Substantial increases in graduating classes can be anticipated in the next few 
years as the full impact of large enrolment increases is felt," the report says. Enrolment of 
full-time university students in 1961-62 was 129,000, which was 13 per cent more than 
the 1960-61 total of 114,000. In turn, enrolment in 1960-61 was 12 per cent larger than 
that of the preceding year. If this trend continues, nearly 150,000 full-time university 
students will be enrolled in 1962-63. 



12 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Labour's Annual Briefs to Government 

For second time in 1962, Canada's three central labour organizations submit 
recommendations. CLC criticizes certain of Government's austerity measures; 
CLC and CNTU advocate economic planning; railwaymen seek Railway Act changes 



Canada's three central labour organiza- 
tions, for the second time in 1962, last 
month presented memoranda containing 
legislative and administrative recommenda- 
tions to the federal Cabinet. Each had sub- 
mitted a brief in March (L.G., April 1962, 
p. 402). 

The Canadian Labour Congress, in its 
brief presented on December 11, criticized 
certain of the Government's austerity mea- 
sures for their "restrictive effect on the 
economy," expressed concern over unem- 
ployment and the "lack of adequate mea- 
sures to offset" an economic decline pre- 
dicted for the early part of 1963, and 
advocated a program of economic planning. 
The CLC spoke favourably, however, of 
the Government's plans to help soften the 
impact of automation. 

The Confederation of National Trade 
Unions also urged economic planning by 
the Government. To supplement such a 
policy, its brief of December 11 recom- 
mended four short-term measures. And it 
criticized the Minister of Labour's bill on 
automation problems "as not being bold 
enough." 

The National Legislative Committee, In- 
ternational Railway Brotherhoods, in its 
submission on December 12 repeated re- 
quests of earlier annual submissions for 
revision of the Railway Act to provide 
for suitable compensation of employees 
displaced by the closing of stations or other 
facilities, and for improved health and 
sanitation provisions. The- Committee com- 
mended the Government for its Technical 
and Vocational Training Assistance Act of 
1960, and advocated research into the par- 
ticular skills that should be taught. 

Members of the Cabinet, including the 
Minister of Labour, joined in giving the 
Government's replies to the memoranda, 
the Prime Minister finding it necessary to 
leave the individual delegations before the 
reading of the submissions was complete. 

The CLC Brief 

The Canadian Labour Congress criticized 
the Government's economic policies, saying 
that certain of its austerity measures "will 
have a restrictive effect on the economy," 
and expressed apprehension about the unem- 
ployment problem, which apprehension it 
said was "compounded by the fact that 
there is a real lack of adequate measures 



to offset" the economic decline in the early 
part of 1963 that was being predicted by 
economists both in Canada and the United 
States. 

The Congress had reluctantly agreed with 
some of the measures taken by the Govern- 
ment — for example, the emergency import 
restrictions — because of the acute balance- 
of-payments crisis. But it thought it most 
unwise to regard these restrictions as a 
long-term solution. 

We believe that any attempt to make the 
present emergency surcharges on imports per- 
manent, or to implement any other long-term 
import restrictions, would only result in harm- 
ful price increases in our economy. Increased 
costs might have a serious effect on our ability 
to export, and we should thus be no nearer, 
perhaps even farther off, from solving our 
balance of payments problem. 

Such restrictive measures are out of step 
with today's need for substantial liberaliza- 
tion of world trade, the brief continued. 
"They are out of step with the important 
tariff changes which the Kennedy adminis- 
tration is seeking to bring about between 
the United States and Western Europe." 

Liberalization of trade should not be 
at the expense of any one industry or indus- 
tries, the Congress declared. "There must 
be adequate compensation for any employees 
and employers affected. Workers must be 
guaranteed adequate income maintenance 
during any period of readjustment." 

In the section of the brief headed "The 
Economic Situation," the CLC criticized 
also the abandonment of a floating exchange 
rate in favour of a fixed rate. For Canada, 
with its comparatively open economy, a 
free rate is helpful in adjusting the balance 
of international payments to meet domestic 
needs, but with a fixed rate, domestic poli- 
cies may have to be adjusted to meet 
balance-of-payment requirements. 

Also criticized were the cut-back in the 
Government's own building program and 
the reduction of Canada's aid under the 
Colombo Plan. 

What has been happening is that Canada 
has been standing virtually still or slipping 
backward while other countries have been 
forging ahead. Such a development, if it is 
allowed to continue, cannot but worsen our 
situation. We simply cannot afford the waste- 
fulness of capital goods used below capacity 
nor the non-productivity, let alone the inhuman- 
ity, of idle manpower. 

Proposals advanced by the CLC included: 
assistance to secondary industry to com- 
pete effectively with foreign products, ex- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



13 



port subsidies under certain circumstances, 
seasonal biases in monetary and fiscal poli- 
cies to encourage winter construction, special 
forms of regional aid, and massive expan- 
sion in the public sector of the economy. 

Economic Planning 

The CLC found satisfaction in the in- 
creased support for economic planning, in 
the realization by various interests that "we 
cannot hope to achieve prosperity and full 
employment by the random operation of 
the market place." 

The Congress stressed the urgency of a 
program of economic planning "so that the 
material and human resources of our coun- 
try can be fully and effectively utilized 
to strengthen our economy, stimulate busi- 
ness, and give our workers jobs." 

The Government's objective of creating 
more than a million new jobs over the 
next five years with a corresponding growth 
in the gross national product can best be 
achieved through economic planning, the 
brief said. 

The Congress welcomed the reference in 
the Speech from the Throne to the establish- 
ment of a National Economic Development 
Board and of an Atlantic Development 
Board, and noted with approval that the 
NEDB would be "broadly representative." 

If labour, business and similar groups 
are to be represented, "they should be 
invited to name representatives to speak 
on their behalf." If the Government wishes 
to have the views of organized groups, "it 
seems only logical to us that they should 
go directly to them rather than give them 
token representation through individual 
appointments." 

But the CLC considered that more than 
a National Economic Development Board 
was required. "We urge the establishment 
of governmental instruments which will set 
such planning in motion, capable of im- 
plementing advice from the National Eco- 
nomic Development Board or any other 
advisory bodies." 

Automation 

The CLC spoke favourably of the Govern- 
ment's announced intention to aid employers 
and workers in meeting the impact of 
automation, which "has already brought 
about substantial changes in the composition 
of the labour force." A high degree of 
versatility and a relatively higher standard 
of education are now needed. 

There are in addition such matters as the 
location and relocation of industry, the mobility 
of workers and their training and retraining 
for new jobs, the relocation of workers where 
necessary with all the social and economic 
consequences of such action, the orderly re- 
tirement of workers displaced by machines and 
too old for effective retraining, and the like. 



There is moreover the important question of 
priorities as between the private and the public 
interest governing the manner in which tech- 
nological innovations are introduced and the 
way in which their impact is absorbed. 

Here is a very considerable area in which 
there is a high degree of mutuality of interest 
between labour, management and other elements 
in our community. Whatever measures are 
introduced, they should provide for effective 
consultation with representative bodies. 

Speaking of the relocation of industry, 
"a problem that exists regardless of changes 
in technology," the CLC said there has 
been a strong disposition on the part of 
corporations to transfer plants from one 
locality to another in order to gain advan- 
tages for themselves. There are undoubtedly, 
in the eyes of the corporation, legitimate 
reasons for making such* changes. 

But it is not enough for a corporation to 
be allowed to make changes of this sort which 
have far-reaching effects without being required 
to examine the social and economic con- 
sequences of its action. The transfer of a 
plant from one location to another may result 
in loss of jobs, in lost savings represented by 
homes rendered valueless, a dislocation of 
family life and other severe social and economic 
disturbances. To the community which has 
been deserted, the loss of a plant or industry 
may mean blight and industrial decay. The 
social investment in streets, sanitation, schools, 
hospitals and other facilities may be lost 
beyond recovery. The social losses may out- 
weight by far the private advantage which 
flows from a decision to relocate. 

Corporations are already required by law 
to meet certain standards for the protection 
of employees and the public, and they 
should be required to justify any proposal 
to locate or relocate in light of the public 
interest. "Whatever decision is made should 
reflect the needs of the community and 
not merely those of the corporation," the 
brief proposed. 

Corporations and Labour Unions 
Returns Act 

The Corporations and Labour Unions 
Returns Act will impose on unions unneces- 
sary and onerous burdens, the CLC pro- 
tested. Reporting a variety of kinds of 
information may seriously impede the legi- 
timate activities of unions. 

"It is altogether possible that unions will 
find it necessary to make constitutional and 
other procedural changes in order to satisfy 
the requirements of the Act," the brief 
said, urging reconsideration of the legisla- 
tion. 

The Right to Strike 

The CLC said it disagreed with sugges- 
tions that strikes were obsolete or unjus- 
tified. 

It said in its brief that our free society 
gives workers the right collectively to with- 
draw their labour and employers the right 
to withhold employment — but through rules 



14 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



that make such action possible only under 
certain circumstances. 

"It is by no means correct to assume, as 
many evidently do, that such economic 
action may be taken arbitrarily or without 
regard to law." A strike may work a 
hardship on one or other of the parties 
involved — "which is what is intended" — 
but, at most, an inconvenience to others. 
"It is debatable whether the public interest 
is so imperilled that a basic civil right 
should be curtailed or eliminated ... It 
may be better to risk public hardship on 
some infrequent occasion than to place so 
great a restriction on the right of workers 
to control their own labour." 

So far, no effective substitute for the 
strike has been found. 

"We suggest that it would be contrary 
to good public policy to heed proposals 
[to ban strikes] that have been made." 

Social Security 

The question of old age security con- 
tinues to be important, and "we regret 
that lack of support from certain of the 
provinces has so far prevented you from 
taking action" in respect to a constitutional 
amendment that would permit the introduc- 
tion of a public system of pensions and 
disability and survivors' benefits. 

"We would like to repeat the suggestion 
that, pending such an amendment, you 
establish consultative machinery that would 
enable organized labour, management, agri- 
culture and others to offer advice concern- 
ing the principles on which proposed legis- 
lation might be based." 

The CLC said it took exception on a 
number of grounds to recent suggestions 
-that persons receiving public assistance 
should be required to perform work in 
return. First, the proposal fails to recognize 
the purpose of public assistance: to provide 
assistance to the unemployable and those 
who are unable to find work and are 
without other resources. Second, it trans- 
forms a social benefit into an obligation 
and "the compulsion to do the work or be 
cut off relief is offensive and contrary to 
our concept of freedom." Third, work for 
relief may be simply a way of getting 
work done "on the cheap" by replacing 
regular employees with relief workers. 

Assuming that there is work to be done, it 
should be done in the appropriate way. It 
should be done either by properly qualified 
employees already on staff, by workers engaged 
through the National Employment Service or 
through some other legitimate channel. Workers 
hired should be engaged on the basis of their 
ability, not their dependence on relief. The 
rate of pay should reflect standards established 
through collective bargaining or other recog- 
nized procedures. Failure to do so creates 
inequities and undermines existing wage scales. 



Through its grants-in-aid program, the 
federal Government has a powerful voice in 
the disposition of social assistance funds, 
the CLC said, and asked that the Govern- 
ment use its power to preserve the use of 
social assistance payments against abuse. 

International Affairs 

A thorough review of Canada's defence 
and foreign policy is urgently needed, CLC 
said. It outlined a six-point program that 
had been adopted at its convention in April. 

The program called on the Government 
to: 

— Support every constructive effort to bring 
about complete and general disarmament, under 
effective international control. 

— Conclude a treaty to establish a non- 
nuclear club of nations which would under- 
take not to manufacture, store, or permit 
nuclear weapons on their soil or use nuclear 
weapons at any time. 

— Oppose the spread of nuclear weapons to 
countries which did not yet possess them and 
refuse to permit nuclear weapons on Canadian 
soil or in the hands of Canadian Forces. 

— Eliminate frills and waste from defence 
expenditures and use the money for the develop- 
ment of the public sector at home and increased 
aid to economically less-developed nations 
abroad. 

— Critically examine Canada's commitments 
to existing regional defence alliances, such as 
NATO, taking into account a changing world 
situation. 

— Prepare a comprehensive national plan for 
the gradual channeling of defence expenditures 
into constructive peace projects, thereby avoid- 
ing sudden economic dislocation, should uni- 
versal disarmament be achieved. 

The CLC suggested that the authority 
of the United Nations be strengthened. "We 
urge your government to support every 
measure designed to enhance the prestige, 
authority and jurisdiction of the United 
Nations and its agencies, and to insist that 
the General Assembly should create a per- 
manent international police force." 

Deep disappointment was expressed at the 
Government's action in cutting aid to other 
countries. "Canadians, one of the richest 
people in the world, are not doing enough 
in comparison with other industrialized 
nations and could well afford to spend a 
larger share of their national income on 
external aid," the CLC said. "We call on 
your Government to spend at least one 
per cent of our national income for aid 
to the economically less-developed coun- 
tries." 

Other Recommendations 

The CLC expressed pleasure at the intro- 
duction of Bill C-70, the Occupational 
Safety Act, and suggested consideration of 
legislation having to do with radiation 
hazards and the necessary safeguards against 
them. It also urged legislation that will 
give government employees the right to 
engage in collective bargaining with the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



15 



Government and establish an orderly system 
for the settlement of disputes when bargain- 
ing fails to bring about a mutually satis- 
factory agreement; and again requested that 
the check-off be extended to government 
employees who are members of CLC unions. 

In view of the appointment of a Royal 
Commission on Taxation, the CLC made 
no submission on the subject except to 
express disappointment that the Govern- 
ment had not appointed a labour represen- 
tative to the Commission. 

The CLC asked the Government to 
strengthen the Canadian Broadcasting Cor- 
poration, and assure it of reasonable in- 
dependence of action. It suggested that 
financing of the CBC be by way of statutory 
grants over a sufficiently long period to 
enable the corporation to plan ahead. 
Appointment of a standing parliamentary 
committee on broadcasting was also pro- 
posed to replace the ad hoc committees 
hitherto established from time to time. 

The brief said the Ontario court decision 
that held the Unconscionable Transactions 
Relief Act to be ultra vires of the province 
was cause for serious concern and hoped 
the Government was "watching this matter 
with the intent of taking legislative action 
should that prove necessary." 

On other matters, including housing and 
education, the Congress drew attention to 
the recommendations made in its previous 
brief (L.G., April 1962, p. 402). 

Government's Reply to CLC 

The Government's reply to the CLC 
memorandum was given by Hon. Michael 
Starr, „ Minister of Labour. The Prime 
Minisfer had told the delegation in his 
remarks of welcome that it would be im- 
possible for him to stay for the entire 
presentation. 

The CLC had been "a little on the 
pessimistic side" when dealing with the 
economic and employment situation, Mr. 
Starr said. "Unemployment in the first 10 
months of 1962 has declined 19 per cent 
in comparison with the same period last 
year," and the gross national product for 
the first six months is 8.6 per cent above 
last year; therefore "it is difficult to see 
the 'slipping back' to which your submission 
refers." The gross national product is now 
running at $65 per capita higher, in constant 
dollars, than in 1957, he added. 

The surcharges to which the CLC had 
expressed opposition have in many cases 
meant jobs for Canadians by encouraging 
the manufacture of Canadian products, the 
Minister said. 

Bill C-83, dealing with automation and 
manpower adjustment, must be looked at 
within the context of a free economic 



system, he said. The Bill embodies the 
principle of planning ahead, if any legisla- 
tion did, while at the same time preserving 
the rights of management and labour in its 
application, as well as those "human values" 
that a report to President Kennedy by a 
committee headed by former U.S. Secretary 
of Labor Goldberg emphasized must be 
preserved. 

"Bill C-83 is not a cure-all; but it pro- 
vides a context and a frame of reference 
within which to work." 

Mr. Starr announced that it was his 
intention when the Bill passes Parliament 
to call together representatives of labour 
and management to discuss the specific 
application of its provisions in various indus- 
tries. "It will be an opportunity for labour 
and management to express their viewpoint 
and give suggestions, and if the suggestions 
are agreed upon by those who will be 
present, they will be incorporated in the 
regulations under the Bill." 

The principle of planning was embodied 
also in the vocational training and school 
construction program. "Surely the program 
for the training of unemployed represents 
planning," he said. 

Here the Minister reported that of the 
800 persons retrained under the unemployed 
training program in Cornwall, Ont., 95 per 
cent had been placed in jobs. 

He had no fear that the schools being 
built under the program would not be used. 
As an "exaggerated" example he cited the 
technical school at Moncton, with a capacity 
for 700 students, which is now filled and 
has a waiting list of 3,400. 

Seasonal unemployment will be a prob- 
lem as long as we have a primary economy 
subject to seasonal variations, Mr. Starr 
continued. "The way to provide year-round 
employment, of course, is to expand the 
secondary manufacturing industry." The 
Government had devoted every effort toward 
providing incentives, fiscal and economic 
encouragement, to secondary industry. Partly 
as a result of this, more than 60,000 new 
jobs were created this year alone in manu- 
facturing. 

CNTU Briet 

The CNTU urged the Government to 
proceed resolutely toward economic plan- 
ning; it believed this was the only remedy 
to the evil of chronic unemployment. 

Unemployment is not only a symptom 
of a deficient economic structure, but is 
also the cause of evils that require prompt 
solution, the brief said. It suggested four 
short-term measures in addition to economic 
planning: changes in the winter works pro- 
gram, in housing loans, in transfer payments 
and in economic analyses. 



16 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Winter Works 

Although recognizing the value of the 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program, 
the CNTU complained about its lack of 
flexibility in that it does not take sufficient 
account of regional differences. Since winter 
is not the same everywhere in Canada, the 
CNTU held, some regions benefit less from 
the advantages of the program. 

The CNTU suggested also the establish- 
ment of a progressive rate of assistance 
corresponding to the rate of unemployment. 
In short, it suggested taking into account 
the different situations existing in the 
municipalities in connection with seasonal 
unemployment. 

Housing Loans 

The CNTU urged the Government to 
lower the interest rate on home building 
loans to 2 per cent. 

Lower interest would enable a certain 
number of workers to acquire a family 
property and, if the reduction applied only 
to nouses started between December 1 and 
May 1, it would stabilize employment in 
the building industry. 

Transfer Payments 

The CNTU declared itself in favour of 
raising family allowances, old age pensions 
and pensions to disabled persons as a means 
of increasing purchasing power. 

The memorandum recognized that such 
a measure would not correct the defects 
of Canada's economy, which occur at the 
production level, but an increase in transfer 
payments "is a quick and effective means 
to satisfy urgent needs and to stimulate 
the economy until planning bears some 
permanent fruits." 

Economic Analyses 

The fourth short-term remedy suggested 
by the CNTU was to analyse unemployment 
conditions by small economic regions so 
as to give preference, when extending cre- 
dits for public works, to the regions hardest 
hit by underemployment. 

Economic Planning 

The CNTU reiterated that "so long as 
Canada does not determinedly engage in 
economic planning, Canadians will endure 
chronic insecurity." 

Not only must the Government not be 
afraid of planning, but it must embark in 
it while taking into account all the modern 
requirements of democratic planning, re- 
quirements that our federal system will 
allow us to fulfil advantageously. 

The CNTU believes that planning must 
originate, as much as possible, in the prov- 
inces, with the federal Government co- 
ordinating it. 



Automation 

The bill submitted by the Minister of 
Labour concerning the employment prob- 
lems arising from automation was criticized 
by the CNTU "as not being bold enough." 

The memorandum stated that "the Starr 
bill offers only half-solutions: a better use 
of employment bureaus when what is 
needed is the creation of new jobs; the 
assumption of 50 per cent of the cost of 
certain studies in given enterprises when a 
general government enquiry is essential; the 
payment of half the price of railway fare 
for the workers being relocated in a new 
job, when this is only a minor part of the 
expenses involved in moving." 

The CNTU said, however, that although 
it was not opposed to automation, "it wants 
to make sure that the workers are not the 
only one to absorb the cost." 

National Economic Development Board 

The CNTU once more requested the 
establishment of a council for economic 
guidance whose duty would be to "recom- 
mend to the Government whatever measures 
are necessary to strengthen our economy." 

The memorandum suggests that, in the 
meantime, the members of the proposed 
National Economic Development Board not 
be appointed as individuals, but on the 
recommendation of their organizations; that 
the Board's recommendations be made 
public; that the Board include persons from 
all sectors of economic activity and, finally, 
that the Board be made up of committees 
as representative as the Board itself and 
aided by experts. 

The committees suggested by the CNTU 
would deal with economic research, produc- 
tivity, industrial research, combines and 
trust act, capital expenditures and foreign 
trade. 

CNTU President Jean Marchand then 
remarked that a Board having no control 
over capital expenditures would "miss the 
boat." 

The Glassco Report 

The CNTU said it was astounded by 
some of the findings of the Glassco Royal 
Commission on Government Organization. 

It pointed out that "responsible citizens 
who care for the common good cannot be 
indifferent to the administrative carelessness, 
the lack of co-ordination, the waste of public 
funds brought out by the Commission." 

The CNTU, however, expressed disagree- 
ment with "the philosophy inspiring the 
recommendations of the Commission and 
its unproved contention that to resort to 
private enterprise is the only appropriate 
remedv." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



17 



The memorandum is particularly opposed 
to the recommendations tending to weaken 
Crown Corporations. 

The CNTU stated further that "it regrets 
that for some years there has been a sys- 
tematic campaign conducted against the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the 
National Film Board and Trans-Canada Air 
Lines. This campaign, under the pretext 
of a need for reorganization, is aiming at 
nothing else than the destruction of those 
institutions, which we believe are essential 
to the safeguarding of the public weal." 

The CNTU declared itself in favour of a 
true bilingualism in the federal administra- 
tion: two working languages on even status. 

The brief adds: 

Why should not the federal Government 
legislate right now that, starting in 1967 — this 
would be a splendid anniversary present, 
although it is only the recognition of a right 
more than 100 years delayed — every civil ser- 
vant hired by the federal Government for 
employment in Ottawa should be bilingual? 
This would give the students of today ample 
time to prepare for such an eventuality. 

Collective Bargaining for Civil Servants 

The CNTU once again claimed the right 
to collective bargaining for employees of 
the federal Government. The right of 
association means something only as long 
as it is tied to that of collective bargaining, 
the CNTU emphasized. 

The brief pointed out that the Govern- 
ment obliges employers to bargain collec- 
tively with their employees but that it 
shirks from the application to itself of the 
general law. 

Mr. Marchand then remarked that the 
employees of the Department of Public 
Printing and Stationery whose conditions 
of work and wages are established under 
the standards existing in the printing indus- 
try are at the same time, for purposes of the 
austerity program applied by the Govern- 
ment, treated in the same way as civil 
servants. 

Other Recommendations 

The brief declared itself in favour of the 
Bill introduced by Senator Croll concerning 
consumer credit, which would compel 
dealers to indicate clearly the rate of 
interest on each transaction. In addition, 
the CNTU is in favour of a law providing 
for a reasonable maximum rate of interest 
and compelling the buyer to make a cash 
payment of at least 20 per cent of the 
amount of the transaction. 

The memorandum also requested the 
Government to review again its intention to 
reduce its financial contribution to the con- 
struction of schools for technical and pro- 
fessional training. 



It also suggested many changes concerning 
the adoption of a strictly Canadian mari- 
time policy. 

Government's Reply to CNTU 

The Government's reply to the CNTU 
memorandum was given by Hon. Michael 
Starr, Minister of Labour, and Hon. Leon 
Balcer, Minister of Transport, who spoke 
in French. When welcoming the delegation, 
the Prime Minister had said that it would 
be impossible for him to stay for the entire 
presentation. 

The Minister of Labour repeated a num- 
ber of the remarks he had made to the 
CLC delegates (see above), especially those 
pertaining to unemployment, to Bill C-83, 
and to the calling of a national labour- 
management conference. 

The Minister particularly replied to cri- 
ticisms made against the federal Govern- 
ment's program for the construction of 
vocational training schools. He pointed out 
that it was up to the Province of Quebec 
to build the schools and that the federal 
Government would then assume, uncon- 
ditionally, the responsibility of paying 75 
per cent of the cost. "The success of this 
program lies entirely with the provincial 
Government," he added. He stressed, how- 
ever, that Quebec was probably ahead in 
the field of vocational training and at the 
present time perhaps was not in such great 
need of constructing schools. 

Mr. Starr reiterated that the Government 
intended to show initiative and to be "as 
daring as the provinces, management and 
labour will let us." 

Hon. Leon Balcer, Minister of Transport, 
spoke mainly about the memorandum's sug- 
gestions concerning the shipbuilding indus- 
try. He recalled, among other things, that 
Canada had obtained the consent of all 
the countries who signed the Common- 
wealth Agreement and that the Speech from 
the Throne foresaw legislation limiting trade 
in Canadian coastal waters to ships regis- 
tered and built in Canada. 

Mr. Balcer said the Government's policy 
in regard to subsidies, through which the 
Government pays up to 40 per cent of 
the cost of shipbuilding in Canada, was 
giving excellent results. 

Finally, the Minister revealed that the 
Government was thinking of changing the 
structure of the Canadian Maritime Com- 
mission and promised that the CNTU's 
suggestion for labour representation on that 
Commission would be considered. 



18 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



International Railway Brotherhoods' Brief 

In its brief, the National Legislative 
Committee, International Railway Brother- 
hoods, repeated and emphasized numerous 
requests made in earlier submissions, especi- 
ally that of March 13, 1962 (L.G., April 
1962, p. 411). 

It again requested, as it had done since 
1958, revisions of Sections 168 and 182 
of the Railway Act, so that railway em- 
ployees displaced through the closing of 
stations or other facilities would be suitably 
compensated. It also repeated its request 
for improved health and sanitation facilities 
on locomotives, in rest houses at terminals, 
and at other points. 

The Committee declared its support for 
any improvements that would make it pos- 
sible to train more of our own skilled 
workers, congratulated the Government on 
its Technical and Vocational Training 
Assistance Act of 1960, and suggested that 
research be undertaken to determine what 
particular skills should be taught to develop 
Canada's skilled labour force. 

The Railway Act 

The Committee regretted the "necessity of 
having to repeat a request for revision of 
the Railway Act, particularly Sections 168 
and 182. Our previous four submissions 
have contained the same request . . . but 
we have failed utterly in our attempts to 
have the requested revision made." 

The brief asserted that, because many 
revisions had been made in the Act, "in 
those revisions certain parts of the intent 
have been lost." It recalled a promise made 
by the Minister of Transport during the 
,March 13, 1962 presentation that these 
important and difficult problems would be 
dealt with in a very comprehensive fashion; 
also, the promise that the problem of Sec- 
tion 182 was to be studied by the Standing 
Committee on Railways, Canals and Tele- 
graph Lines at that session (L.G., April 
1962, p. 414). 

A federal conciliation board had also 
stated, on the question of compensation for 
displaced or moved railway personnel, that 
the Minister of Transport had announced 
to the House that this whole question would 
be referred to a Parliamentary Committee 
"at the next session" (L.G., Feb. 1962, p. 
166). 

Because the necessity for revision of the 
Act had been covered in past submissions, 
the Committee wished only to stress the 
urgency of the matter. 

The MacPherson Royal Commission on 
Transportation practically endorsed the aban- 
donment of many thousands of miles of railway 
in Canada. 



President Gordon of the CNR is reported 
by the press to have stated that the CNR 
intends to close some 1,400 agencies. 

These abandonments are going to displace 
many hundreds of employees from their pres- 
ent location where many of them have their 
own homes in which a goodly part, if not all, 
of their savings are invested. 

Unfortunately, the MacPherson Royal 
Commission did not make any specific 
recommendations for the protection of the 
employees forced to move, the brief com- 
mented. 

The Committee said it had been advised 
by a competent authority that, to make 
Section 182 effective in case of abandon- 
ments under Section 168, it was necessary 
only to add to Section 182 the following 
words: "The provisions for compensation 
given under this Section shall apply to 
abandonments approved under Section 168." 

Health and Sanitation 

The brief pointed out that the Committee 
since 1958 in its annual submissions had 
requested: 

That the Government provide for the health 
and comfort of railway employees by requiring 
that toilet facilities be provided and main- 
tained in a sanitary condition for towermen, 
crossing watchmen, enginemen on all types 
of diesel locomotives, all yard service em- 
ployees, trainmen when occupying cabooses, 
and in all boarding cars, railway shops and 
resthouses at terminals. Further, that drinking 
water facilities, sleeping accommodation and 
eating facilities be provided and maintained 
in a sanitary condition. 

The brief referred to the extensive corre- 
spondence the Committee had exchanged 
with the Minister of Transport and his 
predecessor, and with the Minister of 
National Health and Welfare. It referred 
also to the March 1962 and the 1961 sub- 
missions, in which the Committee had 
expressed disappointment that the Sessional 
Committee on Railways, Airlines and Ship- 
ping that was to deal with the matter was 
authorized to concern itself only with 
Government-owned transportation services. 

Pointing to the unsanitary provisions for 
drinking water provided on locomotives — 
one company simply provided a pail with 
a common drinking cup — the brief stated 
also that 1961-62 negotiations with one of 
the major railroad companies to install 
sanitary drinking facilities clearly showed 
"that the company places more importance 
on the cost factor than on the minimum 
sanitary requirements of its employees." 

The brief stated that various permanent 
railway buildings were not connected to 
available water and sewer facilities "due 
to the cost involved in making the con- 
nection." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



19 



A. A. HUTCHINSON RETIRING 

A. A. Hutchinson, since 1960 Chairman 
of The National Legislative Committee, 
International Railway Brotherhoods, who 
is also Vice-President in Canada of The 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, is retiring 
this year. The brief he presented last month 
would be his last, he announced at the 
end of the Committee's audience with the 
Cabinet. 



Automation and Technological Change 

The social problems arising from automa- 
tion and other technological changes de- 
manded "labour-management co-operation 
which can best be brought about through 
government-sponsored programs." The Na- 
tional Productivity Council had obtained 
encouraging results in this direction, but it 
should be given additional scope and 
powers, the Committee proposed. 

The brief approved the formation of a 
National Economic Development Board, 
and the establishment of an advisory council 
in connection with Bill No. C-83 on indus- 
trial change and manpower adjustment, 
introduced in November by the Minister 
of Labour (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1335). The 
brief expressed the hope that all three 
bodies would have close liaison with each 
other, "for only in this way will results 
accrue to the Canadian people." 

Labour Representation on Public Bodies 

Noting with approval the Government's 
policy regarding the appointment of labour 
representatives to public boards and com- 
missions, the Committee offered to meet 
with individual Ministers at their con- 
venience "for the purpose of discussing 
those items which come within their respec- 
tive departments." 

Education 

Congratulating the Government on the 
enactment of the Technical and Vocational 
Training Assistance Act in 1960, and stat- 
ing it was most encouraging that the most 
recent figures showed 435 new schools or 
additions to schools being constructed, the 
brief added, "there is no need to elaborate 
on the necessity of keeping the rate of 
expansion in a position of high priority." 
It also commended the Technical and Voca- 
tional Training Branch, Department of 
Labour, for introduction of its new publica- 
tion Technical and Vocational Education in 
Canada (L.G., Aug. 1962, p .911). 

The brief expressed concern, however, 
over the need for research into the type of 
training that should be given and suggested 
co-ordinated research by the federal and 



provincial Governments, education authori- 
ties and industry, "in order to avoid un- 
necessary duplication and waste of time, 
energy, and money." 

Income Tax Act 

Acknowledging that the dependant exemp- 
tion had been increased during the last 
session of Parliament, the brief, however, 
reaffirmed the Committee's belief that lack 
of purchasing power "has been and still 
is a contributory factor to existing unem- 
ployment in Canada," and that purchasing 
power could be increased by increasing 
income tax exemptions. 

It repeated the requests of the previous 
submission (L.G., April 1962, p. 412), 
adding the request that Section 11 of the 
Act be amended so that expenses incurred 
in behalf of dependent students who are 
in full-time attendance at universities, col- 
leges or other educational institutions in 
Canada be deductible. 

Elimination of Level Crossings 

The brief repeated the request that all 
level crossings eventually be eliminated, 
and again noted with satisfaction that the 
Government had made monies available to 
the Railway Grade Crossing Fund, and that 
the latter was being used to promote the 
safety of the travelling public. The brief 
repeated the suggestion that the Minister 
of Transport continue his efforts toward 
the development and use of suitable warning 
devices until all such crossings would be 
eliminated. 

National Transportation Policy 

The brief stated that the Committee, for a 
number of years, had advocated the creation 
of a Canadian Transportation Authority 
"to combine and expand the present func- 
tions, duties and responsibilities of the 
Board of Transport Commissioners, the Air 
Transport Board, and the Canadian Mari- 
time Commission, in order to formulate a 
policy affecting transportation. Railways, 
airlines, interprovincial trucking and pipe- 
lines are involved and should be included 
in a unified pattern of transportation regu- 
lations . . ." 

Government's Reply to Brotherhoods 

When welcoming the delegation, the 
Prime Minister said he would be unable 
to remain for the complete presentation of 
the brief and that the Government's reply 
would be given by the Minister whose 
jurisdiction was involved. The Ministers 
spoke after the reading of the sections of 
the brief that concerned them. 



20 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Before he left, however, Mr. Diefenbaker 
told the railwaymen that he thought their 
previous request concerning the Railway 
Act had been submitted to the Standing 
Committee on Railways, Canals and Tele- 
graph Lines for a recommendation. When 
Mr. Hutchinson said his belief was that 
this had not been done, the Minister of 
Transport, Hon. Leon Balcer, explained 
that the general election in June had inter- 
vened. The Brotherhood's request would be 
on the order paper, he said, and the Govern- 
ment would move to refer the matter to the 
Sessional Committee on Railways, Canals 
and Telegraph Lines "as soon as the House 
meets again in January." 

"In the next session," the Prime Minister 
said, "I expect we will be able to secure 
some representation now that a railwayman 
is in the Senate." (He was referring to 
Hon. J. A. Robertson, a member of the 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, who 
was appointed to the Senate at the end of 
November.) 

Here Mr. Hutchinson pointed out that 
the first railwayman in the Senate had also 
been "a Robertson." (Hon. G. D. Robert- 
son, a railroad telegrapher appointed to 
the Senate in 1917, was Canada's sixth 
Minister of Labour, serving in that office 
from 1918 to 1921 and again from 1930 
to 1932). 



Commenting on the requested health and 
sanitation measures, Hon. J. W. Monteith, 
Minister of National Health and Welfare, 
reviewed an exchange of correspondence 
between himself and the National Legisla- 
tive Committee, and a meeting in October 
at which he had given assurances that "we 
were going to have some regulation if it 
was within the power" of his Department. 
He reported also on his correspondence 
with the presidents of the CNR and CPR. 
He was now awaiting a report from them. 

Replying to the statements in the brief 
concerning education and automation, Hon. 
Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, said 
facilities for training would be "available 
for many years to come." As to the proper 
courses or skills that were to be taught, the 
Department was obaining co-ordinating 
officers who would liaise closely with the 
provincial Departments of Education to see 
that the new facilities are put to good use. 

Concerning automation, Mr. Starr stated 
that a committee in his Department had 
studied the matter for many years, and that 
he had introduced the manpower adjust- 
ment act. He made the same announcement 
of the intention to call a national confer- 
ence on Bill C-83 that he had made to 
the CLC delegation (see above). He said 
the Government looked forward to the 
co-operation of all concerned — labour and 
management — to help assure the success of 
the measure. 



The Canadian Chamber of Commerce 

Submits Recommendations to Cabinet 

Enlarges earlier requests that unions be made civilly responsible before the 
courts and that judges continue to be eligible for chairmanships of boards of 
conciliation; seeks unemployment insurance regulations to reduce drain on Fund 



In presenting its annual policy declara- 
tions to the Prime Minister and the federal 
Cabinet at Ottawa on November 28, The 
Canadian Chamber of Commerce enlarged 
its requests that unions be made civilly 
responsible before the courts, and that 
judges continue to be eligible to act as 
chairmen of conciliation boards. The Cham- 
ber further submitted expanded policies on 
education and rehabilitation. 

In the presentation to the Cabinet, made 
by a delegation headed by Chamber Presi- 
dent Victor Oland of Halifax, the organiza- 
tion urged increased efforts on behalf of 
the Government to reduce expenditures and 
balance the budget, and recommended the 



immediate establishment of a commission 
to inquire into trade problems. 

The Chamber's policy declarations, eman- 
ating from its 33rd annual meeting held in 
Vancouver in September (L.G., Oct. 1962, 
p. 1114), covered subjects ranging from 
Canada's economic system to the 1968 
Winter Olympics, some 53 policy statements 
in all, with accompanying recommendations. 

Labour Legislation 

Enlarging its previous policy declarations 
requesting the clarification or enactment of 
legislation to make unions civilly respon- 
sible before the courts, the Chamber added 
a recommendation that such legislation pro- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



21 



vide that a trade union, when found to 
have defaulted in obeying the judgment of 
any court, be subject to decertification. 

The Chamber also expanded its recom- 
mendation that judges continue to be eligible 
for appointment as chairmen of conciliation 
boards, by emphasizing that these pro- 
visions should apply "especially in disputes 
affecting the public interest." 

In requesting a stiffening of unemployment 
insurance regulations to prevent abuses in 
the collection of benefits, the Chamber 
added to its previous policy declaration on 
the subject by stating that "other sources 
of drain on the Unemployment Insurance 
Fund deriving from payments to some mar- 
ried women, some pensioners and 'suitability 
of employment' determination should be 
eliminated and the duration of benefits 
reduced." 

In forming its new, additional recom- 
mendations, the Chamber first repeated its 
initial recommendation of the previous year: 
"That provision for seasonal unemployment 
be separated from the Unemployment In- 
surance Fund." It then recommended that: 

— Regulations be enacted that would require 
married women to prove attachment to the 
labour market before being considered for 
benefit payments. 

— Regulations be enacted to eliminate pay- 
ments to persons on pension who are not 
actually seeking work. 

— Some time limit be fixed after which a 
claimant not placed in his primary work would 
be required to be placed in another occupation. 

— The duration of benefit be reduced to 30 
weeks or at most to the maximum duration of 
36 weeks that was effective in 1955. 

— All offenders under the Act be prosecuted. 

Education and Training 

To its previous extensive policy dec- 
larations on education and training, the 
Chamber added another point stressing that 
the educational system should afford equal 
opportunity to all, according to an individ- 
ual's capabilities and his ability to achieve. 

Steps should be taken, it pointed out, 
to enhance the prestige of non-matriculation 
courses among students, parents and teach- 
ers, to encourage students "who will not 
enter university to pursue high school 
courses that combine challenging academic 
content in keeping with the students' 
abilities and vocational content to orient 
students toward employment." 

Among its recommendations on educa- 
tion, the Chamber made the following new 
one: "That member Boards and Chambers 
continue to strive for a uniform national 
standard curriculum in all Canadian public 
schools with regard to the academic pro- 
gram." 



Describing its policies on rehabilitation 
of the disabled, the Chamber commended 
the Government for its legislative action 
in this area, and stated its intention to 
continue its efforts in encouraging its mem- 
bers to provide suitable employment oppor- 
tunities for disabled persons in accordance 
with their abilities. 

On the employment of the physically 
handicapped, the Chamber reiterated: "If 
a handicapped person still has the required 
capabilities, he is not handicapped in that 
particular job." 

In presenting its policies on the import- 
ance of reducing government expenditures 
and exerting greater efforts to secure a 
balanced budget, the Chamber urged that 
"the many excellent recommendations con- 
tained in the first report of the Glassco 
Royal Commission [on Government Organ- 
ization] should be implemented as rapidly 
as possible." 

International Trade 

Stressing the importance of trade, and 
amplifying its earlier policies on interna- 
tional trade relations, the Chamber recom- 
mended that the federal Government im- 
mediately appoint a commission of inquiry 
to investigate trade problems and trade 
agreements, and stipulated that such a 
commission should make its recommenda- 
tions within a year. In addition, it recom- 
mended a re-examination of all trade 
legislation. 

Although conceding that improvements in 
taxation had been made, the Chamber 
urged an immediate overhaul of the federal 
tax structure without waiting for the results 
of the Royal Commission on Taxation. It 
also urged a careful co-ordination of mone- 
tary and fiscal policies. 

Ways must be found to obtain recognition 
of their mutual responsibilities and interests 
by the various elements of the community: 
management, labour, agriculture and consum- 
ers. Such a co-ordinated approach would do 
much to restore and maintain a satisfactory 
rate of economic growth in the economy and 
Canadian industry could then compete more 
successfully in domestic and foreign markets. 

Recognizing the increasing importance of 
manufacturing or secondary industry in 
Canada, the group also asked the Govern- 
ment to establish a sub-department under 
a deputy minister to represent this field. 

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
delegation represented the majority views 
of some 850 member Boards of Trade and 
Chambers of Commerce, having a member- 
ship of some 125,000 businessmen across 
Canada. 



22 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous 
Month 



Previous 
Year 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars (1949 = 

100) 

Total labour income $000,000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



December 
December 
December 
December 
December 

December 
December 
December 

December 
December 
December 
December 
December 
December 

December 
December 

October 
October 

f 1st 9 mos. 
[ 1962 



December 
December 
December 



October 
October 
October 
October 
December 

October 
October 



November 
November 
November 
November 



6,574 
6,160 

582 
5,578 
5,100 

5,353 
674 
133 

414 
70 

154 
93 
51 
46 

387 

27 

125.4 
115.8 

56,568 
28,506 



29 

3,641 

56,660 



$81.59 

$1.89 

41.3 

$77.95 
131.9 

141.6 
1,735 



194.3 
173.6 
174.6 
172.7 



- 0.6 

- 1.8 

- 2.5 

- 1.7 

- 1.5 

+ 5.8 

- 36.9 

- 7.6 

+ 21.1 

+ 29.6 

+ 24.2 

+ 13.4 
+ 186 

+ 17.9 



19.4 
50.0 



0.9 
1.5 



40.8 
61.9 
26.2 



0.2 
0.5 
0.3 
0.4 
0.0 

0.1 
0.8 



- 0.4 

- 0.8 

- 1.0 

- 0.8 



1.2 
1.3 

2.8 
1.7 
2.5 

3.5 

12.4 
4.3 

0.2 
9.4 
19.4 
17.7 
16.4 
0.0 



- 0.8 
+ 17.4 

+ 2.0 
+ 3.3 

+ 0.7 
+ 2.3 



31.0 
83.5 
59.4 



3.3 

2.7 
0.2 
3.0 
1.6 

1.3 
5.5 



+ 5.4 

+ 6.0 

+ 11.1 

+ 2.1 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from The Labour 
Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. These figures are the result of a 
monthly survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the purpose of providing estimates 
of the labour force characteristics of the civilian non-institutional population of working age. (More than 
35,000 households chosen by area sampling methods in approximately 170 different areas in Canada are 
visited each month.) The civilian labour force is that portion of the civilian non-institutional population 
14 years of age and over that was employed or unemployed during the survey week. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



23 



Manpower Situation, Fourth Quarter, 1962 



Apart from seasonal movements, employ- 
ment in 1962 remained fairly stable since 
midsummer, after showing a substantial 
improvement during the first half of the 
year. For the year as a whole, total em- 
ployment averaged 168,000 higher than in 

1961. Non-farm employment showed an 
annual gain of 189,000; farm employment 
declined by 21,000. 

Unemployment has shown an irregular 
trend during the past year. In December 

1962, the seasonally-adjusted unemployment 
rate was 6.0 per cent. This compares with 
a high for the year of 6.4 per cent in 
June, a month in which a record number of 
students entered the labour market in search 
of summer jobs. The month before the 
influx of students, the unemployment rate 
had fallen to 5.6 per cent, well below the 
low point reached in the 1958-59 business 
upturn. Total unemployment, on average, 
was 78,000 lower than in 1961, virtually 
all of the decrease being among unemployed 
men. 

Although the last half of 1962 was 
featured by stability in the labour market, 
there was a further expansion in output. In 
the third quarter, output in real terms 
increased by 1 per cent. With sizeable 
gains earlier in the year, the Gross National 
Product in the first three quarters of 1962 
was running about 8 per cent higher than 
in the comparable period of 1961. In both 
the second and third quarters, the per 
capita production in real terms exceeded 
the previous high, in the fourth quarter of 
1956. 

Some economic indicators augur a con- 
tinuation of the upward trend in business 
activity for the fourth quarter. Retail sales 
increased more than seasonally, with gains 
being posted in most major lines of retail 
trade. Motor vehicle sales, which had shown 
remarkable strength during the first nine 
months of 1962, rose more than seasonally 
between September and October. An up- 
ward trend in labour income continued 
into the fourth quarter. 

Also making a strong positive contribu- 
tion to the level of economic activity in 
the current expansion was the upward trend 
in exports. In the first ten months, exports 
averaged about 9 per cent higher than in 
the same period in 1961. 

Housing starts declined slightly between 
the third and fourth quarter but were still 
running somewhat above the level of the 
year before. 



Employment 

The seasonally-adjusted composite index 
of employment has been relatively stable 
since mid-year. This feature was not charac- 
teristic of all major industrial divisions, 
however. An upward trend was still evident 
in service, finance and manufacturing, 
although the gains were generally small. 
Employment decreased in forestry, mining 
and construction. 

The improvement in manufacturing was 
largely the result of buoyancy in the durable 
goods division. Employment in non-dur- 
ables, seasonally adjusted, showed little 
change over the period. 

The main strengthening in the durable 
goods component was in the motor vehicle 
and motor vehicle parts industry. Some- 
what smaller employment gains occurred 
in shipbuilding, electrical apparatus and 
wood products. Employment in the aircraft 
and parts industry was maintained at a high 
level until the end of August but has 
declined since, owing to layoffs at the 
Canadair plant in Montreal. In the non- 
ferrous metals industry, activity was cur- 
tailed during September and October because 
of a major industrial dispute in Quebec. 
Employment in the iron and steel industry 
showed successive month-to-month increases 
from January to September but declined in 
October as a result of production cutbacks 
in primary iron and steel. Data on steel 
ingot production for November and Decem- 
ber indicate that the industry closed the 
year on a strong note. In the final two 
months of 1962, steel ingot production 
averaged 17 per cent higher than in the 
corresponding period in 1961. 

As indicated earlier, the highlight in 
manufacturing during the past year was 
the strong performance of the automotive 
industry. A very active first half of 1962 
was followed during the third quarter by 
cutbacks in production and employment 
for retooling and model changeover. After 
this transition period, production and em- 
ployment rose sharply. Between September 
and October production of motor vehicles 
rose by more than 60 per cent. The January- 
October production figures for both passen- 
ger cars and commercial vehicles were 32 
per cent higher than those in the com- 
parable period in 1961. Employment in 
October was 11 per cent higher than in 
October 1961. 

In general, employment in the service- 
producing industries continued to expand. 
Service did not advance in 1962 at the 
rapid rate characteristic of the division in 



24 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



1961. From January to October, the index 
rose by 6 per cent whereas over the same 
period in the previous year the gain was 
11 per cent. 

In trade, employment was fairly buoyant 
in the first half of the year but levelled 
off after June, mainly due to slackening 
in the retail component. Finance, insurance 
and real estate registered an employment 
gain of 4 per cent between January and 
October; the better part of the increase 
took place since mid-year. Apart from a 
large strike in the trucking industry in the 
second quarter, employment in transporta- 
tion, storage and communication showed no 
significant change since the beginning of 
the year. 

The downturn in forestry employment 
that became apparent in the fourth quarter 
reflected mainly a decline in pulpwood 
operations in the Atlantic region. Mining 
employment has fallen steadily since June, 
the most noticeable weakening being in 
fuels. Construction employment has been 
edging down steadily since May, although 
in recent months the decline has been rela- 
tively small. In the fourth quarter, employ- 
ment in construction was somewhat higher 
than the year before whereas in forestry 
and mining it was lower. 

Labour Income 

Labour income showed a strong advance 
during the first half of 1962 as a result of 
continuing; gains in employment, rising 
wage rates and longer average hours. In 
seasonally-adjusted terms, the increase be- 
tween January and June amounted to 2.5 
per cent. During recent months, advances 
in wages and salaries have been considerably 
more modest, mainly reflecting a levelling 
off in employment and a slight reduction in 
the average length of the work week in 
manufacturing industries. 

In October, labour income was estimated 
at $1,735 million, a rise of 5.5 per cent 
from that in October 1961. Regionally, the 
largest percentage increases over the year 
occurred in Ontario, where the gain was 
6.6 per cent. The Atlantic region showed 
the smallest relative gain, 2.7 per cent. 

Workers in manufacturing industries 
earned on the average $1.89 per hour in 
October. This was 3 cents an hour more 
than at the beginning of the year and 5 
cents more than in October 1961. Average 
weekly earnings, at $77.95, were $2.26 
higher than in October the year before. 

In the automotive and shipbuilding in- 
dustries, average weekly earnings were 



sharply higher than the year before, largely 
reflecting increased overtime at premium 
rates. Wage rates in these industries were 
also substantially higher, the gains being 
above the average for all manufacturing. 
All major industries registered gains over 
the year in both hourly earnings and 
weekly wages. The average number of hours 
worked per week increased over the year 
by about a quarter of an hour in the 
durable goods sector but was unchanged in 
non-durables. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment has shown a rather erra- 
tic trend during the past year. The season- 
ally-adjusted rate declined from 5.9 per 
cent in January to 5.6 per cent in May 
but rose sharply during the summer, reach- 
ing a rate of 6.4 per cent in July as a 
record number of students entered the 
labour market during the school vacation 
period. With the reopening of schools, the 
rate fell again to the previous low; more 
recently, however, it has tended to rise. In 
December, the seasonally-adjusted unem- 
ployment rate was 6.0 per cent, virtually 
the same as at the beginning of the year. 

In December, the unemployment total 
stood at 414,000, virtually the same as in 
December the year before. This was about 
114,000 lower than in the same month 
in 1960. The decline in unemployment in 
the past two years has been almost entirely 
among men. The most noticeable decrease 
was among men 25 to 34 years of age, 
the group that experienced the sharpest 
increase in unemployment during the reces- 
sion. 

Of the 414,000 unemployed in December, 
319,000, or more than three quarters, had 
been unemployed for less than three months, 
a substantially larger proportion than in the 
previous year. An estimated 51,000 had 
been seeking work from four to six months 
and 44,000 for longer than six months. 

Included among the 414,000 unemployed 
persons were 72,000 teenagers, the same 
proportion as the year before. As usual, 
the incidence of unemployment was greater 
among young people than it was among 
the more experienced members of the labour 
force. In December, the number of unem- 
ployed in each age group, as a percentage 
of the labour force, varied from just over 
12 per cent in the 14-19 age group to 5 
per cent for those over 25 years old. 

Total unemployment in December was 
6.3 per cent of the labour force, compared 
with 6.4 per cent a year before. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



25 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-DECEMBER 





SUBSTANTIAL 




MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 


— 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




CALGARY 


^_ 


Edmonton 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


QUEBEC-LEVIS 
St. John's 


*— 


Halifax 
Hamilton 






(labour force 75,000 or more) 


Vancouver- 
New Westminister 
WINDSOR 
WINNIPEG 


$z 


Montreal 

Ottawa-Hull 

TORONTO -< — 








Corner Brook 




Brantford 


Guelph 






CORNWALL 


-^ — 


Fort William- 








FARNHAM- 




Port Arthur 








GRANBY 


■^ — 


Kingston 








JOLIETTE 


-^ — 


KITCHENER -< — 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 
(labour force 25,000-75,000; 60 


Lac St. Jean 

Moncton 

NEW GLASGOW 




LONDON -< — 

Oshawa 

Peterborough 






per cent or more in non-agri- 


NIAGARA 




Rouyn-Val d'Or 






cultural activity) 


PENINSULA 
Shawinigan 
SHERBROOKE 


*~ 


Saint John 

Sarnia 

Sudbury 








SYDNEY 


■4 — 


Timmins-Kirkland 








TROIS RIVIERES 


*~ 


Lake 
Victoria 








CHARLOTTETOWN 
PRINCE ALBERT 


tz 


Barrie 

BRANDON -4 — 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 


RIVIERE DU LOUP -< — 
THETFORD-MEGANTIC- 


Chatham 
Lethbridge 






(labour force 25.000-75.000; 40 


ST. GEORGES 
YORKTON 


^z 


MOOSE JAW -<-— 
NORTH BATTLEFORD -<-— 






per cent or more agricultural) 






RED DEER -< — 
REGINA -< — 
Saskatoon 








Bathurst 




Beauharnois 


Kitimat 






BRACEBRIDGE 


-^ 


Belleville-Trenton 


Listowel 






BRIDGEWATER 


-^ 


BRAMPTON -< 


Stratford 






Campbellton 




Central Vancouver 


Woodstock- 






CHILLI WACK 


-^ 


Island 


Tillsonburg 






CRANBROOK 


-^ 


Dawson Creek 








DAUPHIN 


< 


DRUMHELLER -< — 








EDMUNDSTON 


-^ 


Drummondville 








FREDERICTON 


«— 


GALT ■< — 








Gaspe 




GODERICH ■< — 








GRAND FALLS 


-^ 


Kamloops 








MONTMAGNY 


-^ 


Kentville 








Newcastle 




Lachute- 






MINOR AREAS 


OKANAGAN VALLEY 


"^ — 


Ste Therese 






(labour force 10,000-25,000) 


Prince George- 

Quesnel 
PRINCE RUPERT 
QUEBEC NORTH 

SHORE 
Rimouski 
STE AGATHE- 

ST. JEROME 


j: 


Lindsay 

Medicine Hat 

North Bay 

Owen Sound 

Pembroke 

Portage la Prairie 

ST. HYACINTHE -< — 

St. Jean 

St. Thomas 








ST. STEPHEN 


-^ — 








SAULT STE MARIE 


•^ — 


Simcoe 








SOREL 


^ — 


SWIFT CURRENT -< — 








SUMMERSIDE 


£ 


Trail-Nelson 








TRURO 


WALKERTON ■< — 








VALLEYFIELD 




WEYBURN ■< — 








VICTORIAVILLE 


^ — 










Woodstock, N.B. 












YARMOUTH 


*~ 









^-The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classification used, see page 642, June 1962 issue. 



26 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Regional Manpower Situation 



ATLANTIC 



An outstanding feature of the labour mar- 
ket in the Atlantic region during the second 
half of 1962 was the sharp drop in farm 
employment. Non-farm employment, how- 
ever, showed further strengthening during 
this period, mainly reflecting an improve- 
ment in manufacturing and the service- 
producing industries. 

Unusually bad weather and smaller crops 
combined to reduce requirements in agricul- 
ture. In the fourth quarter, farm employ- 
ment averaged 22,000 lower than the year 
before. Non-farm employment was 26,000 
higher than in the closing quarter of 1961. 

Manufacturing employment showed con- 
tinuing strength during the fourth quarter, 
and remained substantially above that dur- 
ing the corresponding period in 1961. In 
October, the employment index (1949= 
100) for this industry stood at 115.9, up 
4.4 per cent from a year earlier. Especially 
noteworthy was the continued improvement 
in the iron and steel industry, which was 
operating at a considerably higher level 
than a year ago. Employment in the food 
processing and wood products industries 
declined seasonally during the fourth quarter 
but continued to be somewhat higher than 
the year before. 

The paper products industry retained its 
buoyancy through most of the fourth quar- 
ter, with employment considerably higher 
than a year earlier. By the end of the year, 
however, the effects of the New York 
newspaper strike were being felt by several 
firms. The transportation equipment indus- 
try remained busy but in December, both 
the railroad and rolling stock and the ship- 
building and repairing industries experienced 
layoffs owing to a lack of orders. 

Employment in the service-producing 
industries continued to climb upward, the 
most marked improvement being in trade. 



In the fourth quarter, employment in this 
industry group was 8 per cent higher than 
in the previous year. 

Construction employment declined season- 
ally between the third and fourth quarter, 
remaining virtually unchanged from the year 
before. Residential construction, although 
continuing at a relatively high level, 
appeared to have lost some of its momen- 
tum. Housing starts for the first 11 months 
of 1962 were slightly higher than for the 
similar period last year; the value of build- 
ing permits issued was slightly lower. 

The mining industry showed some im- 
provement during the latter part of the 
year, mainly reflecting strengthening in metal 
mining. Coal mining, which experienced a 
sharp employment decline after the closure 
of No. 16 colliery in August, has been fairly 
stable since. A comparison with the previous 
year shows a substantial decline in coal 
mining and a moderate advance in metal 
mining employment. 

Forestry employment was substantially 
lower than the year before, largely because 
of increased mechanization, changing work- 
ing patterns, and decreased demand for 
forestry products. The third-to-fourth-quarter 
increase in forestry employment was less 
than seasonal. 

The increase in unemployment from the 
third to the fourth quarter was about equal 
to the change in previous years. Unemploy- 
ment in the fourth quarter averaged 55,000, 
which represented 9.1 per cent of the labour 
force, compared with 8.8 per cent a year 
earlier. 

In December, the classification of the 21 
labour market areas in the region (1961 
figures in brackets) was as follows: in sub- 
stantial surplus, 18 (17); in moderate 
surplus, 3 (4). 



QUEBEC 



The employment decline in the Quebec 
region in the fourth quarter of 1962 was 
in line with seasonal expectations. As 
usual, the largest decreases during the 
quarter were in agriculture and construction. 
Water transportation declined seasonally, 
as did certain parts of manufacturing. 

In the fourth quarter, total employment 
averaged 1,714,000, up 23,000, or 1.4 per 
cent, from the corresponding quarter of 
1961. Aside from agriculture, which de- 
clined by 17,000, all main industrial divi- 
sions shared in the year-to-year employment 
advance. 



The underlying employment trend in 
manufacturing remained firm during the 
quarter. As in the previous quarter, most 
durable goods industries operated at sub- 
stantially higher levels than the year before. 
Long-run government financing of exports, 
subsidies, and devaluation of the Canadian 
dollar combined to stimulate production 
and employment in a number of manufac- 
turing industries. 

The iron and steel and shipbuilding 
industries were particularly active during 
the fourth quarter, operating at substantially 
higher levels than the year before. In 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



27 



October, the respective employment indices 
(1949=100) for these two industries were 
8.9 per cent and 19.6 per cent higher than 
the year before. Employment in the elec- 
trical goods industries also held firm during 
the quarter; both employment and produc- 
tion were substantially higher than in the 
previous year. Seasonal layoffs took place 
in the wood products, textiles, clothing, and 
food processing industries. All of these 
registered year-to-year employment gains, 
however. 

Employment in the aircraft and parts 
industries continued to decline during recent 
months, as a result of further layoffs at 
the Canadair plant in Montreal. In October, 
the employment index for this industry- 
stood at 218.2, a decrease of 20 per cent 
from a year earlier. Production in the 
chemical products industry declined over 
the quarter as a result of a lengthy strike 
in Shawinigan. The pulp and paper products 
industry, which had been operating at a 
high level for most of 1962, experienced 
some short time in December because of 
the New York newspaper strike. 

Construction employment declined sea- 
sonally between the third and fourth quarter. 
Residential construction continued to be a 
major element of strength. Housing starts 
for the first 11 months of 1962 were 17 
per cent higher than for the similar period 
of 1961; the value of non-residential con- 
struction contracts awarded was slightly 
lower. 



With the water navigation season drawing 
to a close, employment in the transportation 
industry declined, as usual. Employment 
in service and public utilities was reported 
to have remained fairly stable throughout 
the closing quarter of 1962. Trade and 
finance showed a moderate advance in em- 
ployment during the period. All of the 
service-producing industries shared in the 
employment expansion over the year. 

In the primary industries, employment 
developments were mixed. Mining employ- 
ment, after allowing for slight seasonal 
variations, held firm during the fourth quar- 
ter, and remained moderately higher than it 
was the year before. The number employed 
in forestry operations increased about sea- 
sonally over the quarter.* Although forestry 
employment was somewhat lower than the 
year before, labour turnover was reported 
to have been lower, and earnings and 
production higher. 

Unemployment increased, on average, by 
28,000 between the third and fourth quarter, 
a somewhat greater than seasonal increase. 
The average was also somewhat higher than 
that of the year before. In the fourth quarter 
of 1962, unemployment averaged 129,000, 
which represents 7.0 per cent of the labour 
force. In the fourth quarter of 1961, it 
averaged 118,000, a rate of 6.5 per cent. 

In December 1962, the classification of 
the 24 labour market areas in the region 
was the same as in December 1961: in sub- 
stantial surplus, 17; in moderate surplus, 7. 



ONTARIO 



Employment in Ontario decreased season- 
ally from the third to the fourth quarter. 
The largest declines were in agriculture and 
construction. Seasonal layoffs occurred also 
in food processing but there were partly 
offsetting gains in other parts of manufac- 
turing. 

Total employment in the region remained 
well above the level of the year before. The 
performance since the trough in the first 
quarter of 1961 compares favourably with 
that of the comparable period of the 1958- 
59 expansion. In some industries, notably 
manufacturing, the performance has been 
considerably better. In the fourth quarter 
of 1962, non-farm employment, seasonally 
adjusted, was 266,000 higher (4.3 per cent) 
than in the first quarter of 1961. 

One of the more important features of 
the Ontario labour market during the fourth 
quarter was the continued strength in manu- 
facturing, particularly in durable goods. 
Especially noteworthy was the high level 
of activity in the automotive, agricultural 
implement, machinery, and sheetmetal prod- 
ucts industries. More than half a million 



cars and trucks were produced in 1962, a 
new record. The latest employment figures 
on the automotive and automotive parts 
industries indicate a year-to-year gain of 
11 per cent. The recent provision which 
allows for the refunding of import duties 
on automatic transmissions on the basis 
of increases in exports has resulted in an 
increase in exports of components. 

Steel consumption in Canada has risen 
substantially during the past year, while 
imports have fallen owing to competitive 
pricing and product diversification on the 
part of domestic producers. Employment 
increased during the fourth quarter in plants 
turning out industrial machinery, sheetmetal 
products and agricultural implements; in 
the latter industry, employment was at a 
higher level than at any time in the last 
three years. Production of structural steel, 
pig iron and iron castings decreased between 
the third and fourth quarter. For the iron 
and steel industry as a whole, employment 
was substantially higher than the year before 
and well above the previous trough. 



28 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



The aircraft and railway rolling stock 
industries showed a firmer trend during 
the fourth quarter but shipbuilding declined. 
Electrical apparatus and furniture showed 
further improvement during the quarter. 
Activity in nickel smelting and refining 
was reported to have decreased. 

In non-durables, the rubber and textile 
industries continued operating at high levels. 
Demand for synthetic fabrics, carpets and 
rugs was reported to be increasing. Season- 
ally-adjusted levels of employment were 
unchanged from the previous quarter for 
the clothing, leather, paper and chemical 
industries. Small declines took place in food 
and tobacco processing. 

Construction employment showed a larger 
than seasonal decrease during the fourth 
quarter, mainly reflecting a drop in house- 
building activity. Non-residential construc- 
tion showed continuing strength, the institu- 
tional and commercial sectors being par- 
ticularly busy. 

Forestry employment in the fourth quar- 
ter followed the seasonal pattern, and 
remained above the corresponding 1961 
level. In mining, the decline was larger than 
usual owing to layoffs in the nickel indus- 



try. Shortages of experienced underground 
miners have eased in many parts of the 
province in recent months as many of 
the workers released from the Sudbury 
nickel mines were absorbed elsewhere. 

Apart from the closing of water naviga- 
tion, little change occurred in transportation 
and public utilities. Retail sales have in- 
creased in recent months but employment 
in trade showed little or no change. Service 
employment continued to advance during 
the fourth quarter, although at a much more 
moderate rate than earlier in the year. In 
all of the service-producing industries, em- 
ployment was substantially higher than in 
the closing quarter of 1961. 

Unemployment dropped in Ontario be- 
tween the third and fourth quarter of 1962, 
whereas it normally increases. Averaging 
81,000 or 3.1 per cent of the labour force, 
the total was substantially lower than the 
101,000, or 4.2 per cent of the labour force, 
in the final quarter of 1961. 

In December, the classification of the 34 
labour market areas in the region (last year's 
figures in brackets) was as follows: in 
balance, 4 (3); in moderate surplus, 25 
(26); in substantial surplus, 5 (5). 



PRAIRIE 



Both farm and non-farm employment 
in the Prairie region, from the beginning 
of. the year, showed little change during 
1962, apart from seasonal movements. And, 
during the fourth quarter, with a near- 
record grain crop and rising personal in- 
comes, the outlook remained fairly bright. 

Total employment in the fourth quarter 
averaged 1,100,000, a gain of 14,000 over 
the year. 

Construction activity was maintained at a 
high level during the fourth quarter, after 
registering strong gains during the third 
quarter. Residential construction, allowing 
for seasonal changes, was off from the peak 
of earlier months but remained much ahead 
of a year earlier. Losses in the industrial 
and engineering sectors were more than 
offset by gains in institutional and com- 
mercial building. 

Employment in metal mining and fuels 
declined for the second consecutive quarter, 
reaching a somewhat lower level than in 
the fourth quarter of 1961. There was some 
improvement, however, in potash mining 
and in quarrying. 

Grain shipments to storage elevators 
across the Prairie and at the Lakehead 
provided additional employment opportuni- 
ties during the fourth quarter, as did a 
number of Winter Works projects designed 
to improve public utilities. 



As crop prospects improved in the sum- 
mer of 1962, retail sales climbed rapidly, 
and in October showed a year-to-year gain 
of 10 per cent. Employment in retail and 
wholesale trade showed little change, how- 
ever. Service employment also remained 
fairly stable, although it was somewhat 
higher than the year before. 

Manufacturing employment fell some- 
what more than seasonally in the fourth 
quarter owing to layoffs in meatpacking, 
foundries, structural steel and boiler shops. 

Employment in manufacturing has shown 
a relatively modest rise since the present 
expansion got under way. Since the business 
cycle trough in the first quarter of 1961, 
manufacturing employment has risen by 
some 3 per cent, after seasonal adjustment. 
For the country as a whole, the gain in 
manufacturing employment was 6 per cent. 

A year-to-year comparison shows sizeable 
gains in some manufacturing industries and 
losses in others. Non-ferrous metals, wood 
and paper products and clothing and print- 
ing were among those showing improve- 
ment over the year. The aircraft, railway 
rolling stock and chemical industries showed 
decreases. 

Unemployment increased seasonally be- 
tween the third and fourth quarter. The 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



29 



fourth quarter average, 41,000, was 3.6 per 
cent of the labour force. During the com- 
parable period in 1961, the figure was 
49,000, representing 4.3 per cent of the 
labour force. 



At the end of December 1962, the classifi- 
cation of the 19 labour market areas in 
the region (1961 figures in brackets) was 
as follows: in substantial surplus, 5 (8); in 
moderate surplus, 14 (11). 



PACIFIC 



In the Pacific region, employment and 
unemployment developments during the 
fourth quarter were mainly seasonal. Em- 
ployment declines were about normal for 
the season in agriculture, manufacturing and 
construction. Mining, which registered a 
strong advance earlier in the year, con- 
tinued to improve. Total employment in 
the fourth quarter averaged 559,000, or 
2.9 per cent (16,000) higher than in the 
fourth quarter of 1961. 

From the cyclical low point in the first 
quarter of 1961, employment in the Pacific 
region has expanded relatively more than 
in any other region. In seasonally-adjusted 
terms, employment showed an increase of 
6 per cent over the past seven quarters. The 
largest gains were in mining, manufacturing 
and the service-producing industries. Mining 
registered a particularly strong advance, 
rising by 15 per cent, after discounting 
seasonal factors. During the same period, 
manufacturing employment rose by 6.3 per 
cent. 

Manufacturing employment declined dur- 
ing the fourth quarter, mainly reflecting 
seasonal layoffs in food processing, iron 
and steel and chemical products. However, 
total manufacturing employment was still 
considerably higher than the year before. 
In October, the employment index for this 
division (1949=100) stood at 123.7, up 
5.1 per cent from the previous year. 

The shipbuilding and iron and steel indus- 
tries showed the most marked year-to-year 
improvement, with respective increases of 
20 per cent and 1 1 per cent being recorded. 
Lesser gains took place in the pulp and 
paper and sawmill industries. Employment 
was somewhat lower than the year before 
in non-ferrous metals and chemicals. 



Mining employment continued to expand 
during the fourth quarter, rising well above 
the level of the previous year's fourth quar- 
ter. The upward trend in activity in this 
industry gained considerable support from 
shipments of copper and iron ore concen- 
trates to Japan. Another development of 
some importance was the completion of 
the new oil pipeline connecting the Peace 
River area with the lower B.C. mainland 
and U.S. markets. 

Construction employment declined sea- 
sonally between the third and fourth quar- 
ter but was still somewhat higher than a 
year earlier. Housebuilding continued to 
be more active than in the previous year 
but non-residential construction remained 
at a somewhat lower level. 

Forestry employment, which reached an 
unusually high level during the third quarter, 
showed little change during the final quarter 
of 1962. For the year as a whole, forestry 
employment averaged 8 per cent higher 
than in the previous year, and timber output 
increased by an estimated 13 per cent. 

The service-producing industries showed 
little change between the third and fourth 
quarter after registering strong advances 
earlier in the year. 

Unemployment increased seasonally from 
the third to the fourth quarter but re- 
mained at virtually the same level as the 
year before. Averaging 40,000, or 6.7 per 
cent of the labour force, it was virtually 
the same as in the fourth quarter of 1961. 

In December 1962, the 12 labour market 
areas in the region were classified as fol- 
lows (1961 figures in brackets): in balance, 
1 (1); in moderate surplus, 5 (6); in sub- 
stantial surplus, 6 (5). 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Shortage 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 




December 
1962 


December 
1961 


December 
1962 


December 
1961 


December 

1962 


December 
1961 


December 
1962 


December 
1961 




6 

12 
5 

28 


6 
14 

6 
26 


6 
13 

9 
26 


6 
11 

8 
29 












1 


1 














4 


3 












Total 


51 


52 


54 


54 


5 


4 













30 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



7th Convention, Quebec Federation of Labour 

Reiterates support of New Democratic Party, pledges help in forming provincial 
branch. Roger Provost re-elected President by acclamation for seventh term 



The seventh annual convention of the 
Quebec Federation of Labour, which took 
place in Quebec City from November 22 
to November 24, reiterated its support of 
the New Democratic Party and decided to 
increase its efforts toward the formation of 
a provincial branch of the party. 

Some 450 delegates attending the three- 
day convention also claimed the right of 
association for public servants, denounced 
Social Credit, called for the abolition of 
injunctions in labour-management disputes 
and protested against nuclear weapons. 

Roger Provost was re-elected President 
by acclamation. There are only two new- 
comers to the new Executive Board. 

The guest speakers at the convention 
included the President of the Canadian 
Labour Congress, the leader of the New 
Democratic Party, the Assistant Deputy 
Minister of Labour for Quebec, the Director 
of Laval University's Department of Indus- 
trial Relations, and the Acting Mayor of 
Quebec City. 

An Executive Board recommendation 
that conventions be held only every second 
year as in the case of the CLC did not gain 
the required two thirds of the votes. 

President's Address 

The QFL President called for a revision 
of the electoral districts of Quebec province, 
declared that the nationalization of elec- 
tricity was not a cure-all, and denounced 
Social Credit's opposition to labour unions. 

In his opening address, Roger Provost 
said that the province's electoral districts 
were "out-of-date and violated the most 
fundamental democratic principles." He 
pointed out that it takes ten voters in an 
industrial county as against one in the rural 
counties to elect one member of the Legis- 
lature. The revision should be made by an 
independent Board whose members were not 
connected with the Legislature, he said. 

The President warned the delegates 
against the tendency to consider the pro- 
posed nationalization of electricity as a 
cure-all. "It will not, in itself, bring full 
employment and, especially, it will not give 
the citizens of the province control over the 
economy." 

In addition, Mr. Provost suggested that 
the expropriation of private power com- 
panies be carried out through a State- 
controlled board rather than through the 
courts. 



He warned the delegates against Social 
Credit, just as Jean Marchand had done 
at the annual convention of the Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions, particularly 
because of that party's anti-union policies. 

Claude Jodoin 

Claude Jodoin, President of the Cana- 
dian Labour Congress, spoke in defence of 
the right to strike and stressed that strikes 
are not out-dated and that it was essential 
that this democratic right be maintained. 
He asserted that the implications of strikes 
are often exaggerated, pointing out that 
much more time is lost in Canada through 
sickness than through work stoppages. 

He expressed the hope, however, that 
labour and management would attain better 
understanding. 

He felt that the establishment of a social 
and economic advisory council would 
enable the labour movement to contribute, 
jointly with management, to the future of 
Canada. 

Joe Morris 

Joe Morris, Executive Vice-President of 
the Canadian Labour Congress, called on 
the Government for "a planned long-term 
expansion of our social capital and the 
development of our human resources." 

Stating that the labour movement in 
Canada does not want any makeshift or 
make-work programs such as were prevalent 
in the thirties, he stressed that far-reaching 
measures were needed, i.e., "expanded and 
methodical planning of the public sector". 

Mr. Morris said that "we want the Gov- 
ernment to launch a planned program of 
expenditures in the public sector of the 
economy on projects that will be self- 
supporting and that will create conditions 
necessary for rapid economic growth and 
increased job opportunities for an ever- 
expanding labour force." 

Mr. Morris, who comes from British 
Columbia, warned Quebec workers against 
Social Credit, saying that "since 1952, when 
Social Credit came to power in British 
Columbia, they have adopted three labour 
laws: Bills 32, 43 and 42, each worse than 
the last and each aimed at cutting down 
the rights of unions." 

T. C. Douglas 

T. C. Douglas, leader of the New Demo- 
cratic Party, called upon the delegates of 
the Quebec Federation of Labour to fight 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



31 



for the right of collective bargaining for 
public servants. Some public servants, such 
as the Post Office employees, he said, were 
toiling under very bad working conditions. 
The Member for Burnaby-Coquitlam 
said that unemployment is presently the 
most serious problem facing the Govern- 
ment. The 200,000 new jobs the federal 
Government is planning to find each year 
will hardly be sufficient to cover the new- 
comers in the labour market, he said. 

Resolutions 

Political Action 

At the end of a three-hour discussion in 
which there was very little opposition, the 
QFL once more gave its full support to 
the New Democratic Party, promised to 
intensify its efforts in political action and 
decided to participate actively in the found- 
ing of a "popular" party at the provincial 
level. 

The convention adopted, with only five 
dissenting votes, a resolution recommend- 
ing that "the incoming Executive Board of 
the Quebec Federation of Labour concen- 
trate its activities, as much as possible, 
toward helping and participating in the 
founding of a new popular political party 
in the province of Quebec." (The founding 
convention of the provincial wing of the 
NDP is to take place in March 1963.) 

Public Servants 

The Quebec Federation of Labour again 
claimed, for federal as well as provincial 
public servants, the right of association, 
including that of joining a trade union of 
their choice, and the right to bargain 
collectively and to strike. The Declaration 
of Principles adopted, however, distinguishes 
between the right to strike and strike action. 

"To suppose that public servants will 
resort to strike action without absolute 
necessity or indiscriminately and irrespective 
of public welfare is to do them wrong," 
the Declaration said. 

Nuclear Weapons 

The convention adopted many resolu- 
tions calling for the abolition of nuclear 
weapons and of nuclear tests in the atmos- 
phere, and congratulating the "Voice of 
Women" organization for its attitude and 
the steps it has taken in that matter. Many 
of the delegates, however, were opposed 
to taking unilateral steps. 

Electoral Map 

The Quebec Federation of Labour once 
more declared itself in favour of revising 
the electoral map of the province. The 
delegates adopted a resolution calling for 
the establishment of an independent board 
composed of "representatives of various 



social classes and sectors of the population 
and of experts in human sciences" to draft 
a bill for the redistribution of electoral 
ridings. 

Annual Conventions 

The Executive Board's recommendation 
that from 1963 biennial conventions be held 
was rejected. As the recommendation re- 
quired an amendment to the constitution, 
it did not obtain the support of two thirds 
of the votes. 

Injunctions 

The Quebec Superior Court judges who 
grant injunctions without valid reasons were 
strongly criticized during the convention 
when the delegates adopted a resolution 
calling for the elimination of injunctions 
in labour-management disputes. 

A resolution, unanimously adopted, re- 
quested that: 

— All injunctions in strike cases be 
eliminated. 

— No interim injunctions in connection 
with the right to work be issued without 
notice and without previous notification to 
all parties concerned; 

— No injunction be issued limiting the 
right of peaceful picketing and the number 
of peaceful picketers. 

The Quebec Federation of Labour stressed 
that the injunction duplicates the provisions 
of the penal code, that it is provocative, 
that it throws discredit on justice and that, 
finally, it is generally harmful to the settle- 
ment of labour-management problems. 

Other Resolutions 

Among the resolutions adopted were 
some calling for: 

— Adoption, within a program of eco- 
nomic planning, of a minimum wage rate 
of $1.25 for all wage-earners in the prov- 
ince; 

— Adoption by the federal Government 
of a full employment policy; 

— Inauguration of trade-union courses for 
primary and high school pupils; 

— Putting into effect by the provincial 
Government of a full health insurance plan; 

— Adoption of an automobile insurance 
plan identical to the one in force in 
Saskatchewan; 

— Maintenance of rent control; 

— Abolition of tolls on public highways; 

— Abolition of premium stamps and 
other such practices; 

— Inspection of all cattle to be slaugh- 
tered; 



32 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



— Immediate abolition of the Quebec 
Legislative Council; 

— Adoption of a law relative to conflicts 
between the personal interests of men in 
politics and of senior public officers and 
the public interest. 

Election of Officers 

Roger Provost was unanimously re-elected 
as President of the Quebec Federation of 
Labour, a post he has held since the 1956 
merger. 

Jean Gerin-Lajoie was re-elected as first 
Vice-President, but Louis Laberge, Presi- 
dent of the Montreal Labour Council, 
replaced Edouard Larose, who retired, as 
second Vice-President. Mr. Larose was 
appointed Honorary Vice-President. 



John Purdie and Andre Thibodeau were 
retained in their respective positions as 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

The industrial group Vice-Presidents are: 
Fernand Daoust, manufacturing; Paul Emile 
Jutras, transportation; Roland Goedike, 
food, beverages and services; Jean Paul 
Menard, wood, loggers and construction; 
Paul Pichette, textiles; and Willie Laporte, 
mines and metals. 

The regional Vice-Presidents are: Aldo 
Caluori, Rene Mondou and Gerard Ran- 
court, City of Montreal; Theo. Gagne, 
Northern Quebec; Jean-Guy Denis, Gatineau 
and Laurentians; Robert Dean, South Shore- 
Eastern Townships; Oscar Longtin, South- 
ern Quebec; Albert Bergeron, St. Maurice 
region; and J. B. Hurens, City of Quebec. 



Industrial Fatalities in Canada 

during Third Quarter of 1962 

Deaths from industrial accidents during quarter numbered 235, decrease of one 
from total in previous quarter and of 62 from number in same quarter of 1961 



There were 235* industrial fatalities in 
Canada during the third quarter of 1962, 
according to the latest reports received by 
the Department of Labour. 

During the previous quarter, 236 fatalities 
were recorded, including 29 in a supplemen- 
tary list. In the third quarter of the previous 
year, 297 fatalities were recorded. 

During the quarter under review, there 
were two accidents that each resulted in 
the deaths of three or more persons. On 
July 22, seven employees of a Canadian 
airline company were killed when an air- 
craft, out of Vancouver, crashed and burned 
while attempting to land at Honolulu Inter- 
national Airport. On September 6, four 
employees were drowned when a fish packer 
vessel sank in the Gulf of Georgia in 
British Columbia. 

Grouping by Industries 

The largest number of fatalities, 42, was 
in the manufacturing industry. Of these, 
15 were in iron and steel products, 6 in 
paper products, 5 in food and beverages, 4 
in wood products, 3 each in transportation 
equipment, non-metallic mineral products 

* See Tables H-l and H-2 at the back of book. 
The number of fatalities that occur during a quarter 
is always greater than the figures quoted in the 
quarterly articles. Information on accidents that 
occur but are not reported in time for inclusion is 
recorded in supplementary lists, and statistics are 
amended accordingly. The figures shown include 43 
fatalities for which no reports have been received. 



and chemical products, 2 in non-ferrous 
metal products and 1 in electrical apparatus. 
For the same period of the previous year, 
62 fatalities were reported: 23 in iron and 
steel products, 7 each in transportation 
equipment and chemical products, 5 each 
in food and beverages and wood products, 
4 in electrical apparatus, 3 each in paper 
products, non-ferrous metal products and 
miscellaneous manufacturing industries, and 
2 in non-metallic mineral products. During 



The industrial fatalities recorded in these 
quarterly articles, prepared by the Working 
Conditions and Social Analysis Section of 
the Economics and Research Branch, are 
those fatal accidents that involved persons 
gainfully employed and that occurred dur- 
ing the course of, or arose out of, their 
employment. These include deaths that re- 
sulted from industrial diseases as reported 
by the Workmen's Compensation Boards. 

Statistics on industrial fatalities are com- 
piled from reports received from the various 
Workmen's Compensation Boards, the Board 
of Transport Commissioners and certain 
other official sources. Newspaper reports are 
used to supplement these. For those indus- 
tries not covered by workmen's compensa- 
tion legislation, newspaper reports are the 
Department's only source of information. It 
is possible, therefore, that coverage in such 
industries as agriculture, fishing and trap- 
ping and certain of the service groups is not 
as complete as in industries covered by 
compensation legislation. Similarly, a small 
number of traffic accidents that are in fact 
industrial may be omitted from the Depart- 
ment's records because of lack of informa- 
tion in press reports. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

63569-8—3 



• JANUARY 1963 



33 



1962's second quarter, 33 employees lost 
their lives in this industry. Eight died in 
each of iron and steel products and trans- 
portation equipment, 4 in food and bever- 
ages, 3 each in wood products, paper 
products and non-ferrous metal products, 2 
in non-metallic mineral products, and 1 
each in textile products and chemical 
products. 

In the construction industry, of the 38 
fatalities reported, 21 were in buildings and 
structures, 10 in highways and bridges and 
7 in miscellaneous construction. Fatalities 
recorded in this industry for the same 
period in 1961 numbered 85; of these, 34 
were in buildings and structures, 23 in 
highways and bridges and 28 in miscel- 
laneous construction. During 1962's second 
quarter, 51 fatalities were listed: 24 in 
buildings and structures, 14 in highways and 
bridges and 13 in miscellaneous construc- 
tion. 

The 36 fatalities recorded in the trans- 
portation, storage and communications in- 
dustry were distributed as follows: 19 in 
local and highway transportation, 10 in 
air transportation, 4 in railway transporta- 
tion and 3 in water transportation. During 
the same period of the previous year, 37 
employees lost their lives in this industry: 
12 in local and highway transportation, 11 
in railway transportation, 8 in air transpor- 
tation, 4 in water transportation and 1 each 
in storage and the unclassified category. 
Accidents during the second quarter of 
1962 resulted in 31 deaths: 12 in local 
and highway transportation, 11 in railway 
transportation, 6 in water transportation 
and 1 each in telegraph and telephones 
and the unclassified category. 

In the mining industry, of the 32 fatalities 
recorded, 20 were in metal mining and 6 
each were in coal mining and non-metallic 
mineral mining. For the same period of the 
previous year, 30 fatalities were listed: 20 
in metal mining, 3 in coal mining and 7 
in non-metallic mineral mining. During the 
second quarter this year, 34 employees lost 
their lives in the mining industry; 24 died 
in metal mining and 5 each in coal mining 
and non-metallic mineral mining. 



There were 25 fatalities in the service 
industry during the quarter: 21 in public 
administration, 3 in personal service and 
1 in recreation service. Fatalities recorded 
for the same period in 1961 numbered 20, 
of which 17 were in public administration 
and 3 in personal service. During 1962's 
second quarter, 15 employees lost their 
lives in this industry: 12 in public adminis- 
tration, 2 in personal service and 1 in 
laundering. 

Grouping by Causes 

An analysis of the causes of the 235 
fatalities during the third quarter of 1962 
shows that 61 (26 per cent) were under 
the heading "collisions, derailments, wrecks, 
etc.". Of these, 28 involved automobiles 
and trucks, 12 involved tractors and load- 
mobiles, 10 involved aircraft, 9 involved 
water craft and 2 involved other transport 
agencies. 

Fifty-four fatalities were under the head- 
ing "struck by" different objects. Of these, 
42 were in the category "other objects," 6 
were the result of being struck by "tools, 
machinery, cranes, etc." and 6 were caused 
by "moving vehicles." 

Forty-two fatalities were caused by "falls 
and slips"; all but three were the result of 
falls to different levels. 

Twenty-eight fatalities were caused by 
being "caught in, on or between." Of these, 
8 involved tractors and loadmobiles, 5 in- 
volved machinery, 4 involved hoisting or 
conveying apparatus, 3 involved automobiles 
and trucks, 2 each involved buildings and 
structures, and belts, pulleys, chains, lines, 
etc., and 1 each involved mine and quarry 
cars, trains and other railway vehicles, mis- 
cellaneous vehicles and crafts and miscel- 
laneous objects. 

By Province and Month 

By province of occurrence, the largest 
number of fatalities, 74, occurred in On- 
tario. It was followed by British Columbia 
with 59 and Alberta with 26. 

During the quarter under review, there 
were 87 fatalities in July, 83 in August and 
65 in September. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J963 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Pan-Pacific Seminar on Vocational 

Rehabilitation of the Disabled 

Week-long conference in Philippines has as its theme, "Self-Respect through 
Employment." Canada's National Coordinator of Civilian Rehabilitation was 
co-chairman of planning committee. Rehabilitation conference in Mexico City 



"Self-Respect Through Employment" was 
the theme of the Pan-Pacific Seminar on 
Vocational Rehabilitation of the Disabled, 
held in Manila, the Philippines, during No- 
vember 1962. The conference was sponsored 
by the World Commission on Vocational 
Rehabilitation in co-operation with the 
Philippine Government and interested organ- 
izations. 

The objectives of the conference were: 

1. To stress the ultimate aim of voca- 
tional rehabilitation: the employment of 
disabled persons in economically useful 
and productive positions; 

2. To examine methods of preparation 
for employment of disabled persons through 
on-the-job training, special education and 
special vocational training centers; 

3. To study the feasibility of pre-voca- 
tional programs for disabled persons; 

4. To examine the role, functions, qualifi- 
cations and training of vocational counsellors 
in the vocational rehabilitation setting; 

5. To study practical methods in the 
development of work habits; 

6. To examine existing national programs 
which are designed to stimulate community 
efforts in employment of the disabled; 

1. To study means of utilizing existing 
international services for the development 
of local and national vocational rehabilita- 
tion programs. 

Nations participating in the conference 
included Australia, Burma, Ceylon, Repub- 
lic of China, Korea, Federation of Malaya, 
New Zealand, Pakistan, Hong Kong, India, 
Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Thailand, 
United States and Vietnam. 

The keynote address was given by Dr. 
Aleksander Hulek, Rehabilitation Officer, 
Social Welfare Administration, United Na- 
tions. Donald V. Wilson, Secretary-General, 
International Society for Rehabilitation of 
the Disabled, spoke on "The Role, Func- 
tions, Qualifications and Special Training of 
the Vocational Counsellor in the Vocational 
Rehabilitation Setting". John A. Nesbitt, 
Director of the World Commission on 
Vocational Rehabilitation, was in attend- 
ance. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 

63569-8— 3i 



Participants in the program included 
P. J. Trevethan of Goodwill Industries in 
the United States; Paul Scher, Executive 
Director of the Governor's Committee on 
Employment of the Handicapped, Illinois; 
and Mrs. Ester Peterson, Assistant Secretary 
of Labor, U.S. Department of Labor; and 
rehabilitation experts from participating 
countries. Papers on "International Team- 
work in Vocational Rehabilitation" were 
presented by representatives of international 
bodies. 

Victor Baltazar, Supervisor, Office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, Philippines, and 
a member of the World Commission on 
Vocational Rehabilitation, shared the chair- 
manship of the planning committee with 
Ian Campbell, National Co-ordinator, Civil- 
ian Rehabilitation, Canada. Mr. Campbell, 
who is Chairman of the World Commission, 
was unable to attend the conference. 

Inter-American Conference on Rehabilitation 

The fifth Inter-American Conference on 
Rehabilitation sponsored by the Interna- 
tional Society for Rehabilitation of the 
Disabled was held in Mexico City in con- 
junction with the fourth National Congress 
for the Rehabilitation of the Physically 
Disabled. The meeting continued for a full 
week. 

H. H. Popham of Ottawa, President of 
the International Society, spoke on the 
program of the International Society and 
its aim to make it possible, through a 
world-wide network of voluntary organiza- 
tions, for every disabled person to eliminate 
or reduce his impairment with the help of 
medical, social, educational and vocational 
services so that he might assume his right- 
ful place in the community. 

Dr. Conrad Zuckerman, Mexican Under- 
Secretary of Health and Welfare, noted 
that it is not enough to keep a man from 
dying. He must be enabled to take his 
rightful place in the world of work and 
assume his rights and responsibilities of 
citizenship. This is a new concept in Mexico, 
where it has been the custom for society 
to take care of disabled persons but now 
society endeavours to train the disabled 
individual to care for himself. 



35 



Older Workers 



Preparation for Retirement 



Purpose for living is most essential need of retired people; another important 
requisite is sufficient income. Both these requirements call for preparation, 
planning for retirement, says Chief of Department's Division on Older Workers 



A purpose for living is perhaps the most 
essential need of retired people, H. L. 
Douse, Chief of the Division of Older 
Workers of the Department of Labour, said 
in an address last month to a church men's 
association in Ottawa. 

Another important requisite was a suffi- 
cient income. "Without it no one can feel 
independent, and a feeling of independence 
is another essential ingredient," he said. 

The speaker emphasized the importance 
of planning and preparing for retirement. 
In particular, people should plan to meet 
two changes that required a considerable 
amount of adjustment, he said. These were: 
the loss of the accustomed occupation, and, 
in most cases, a reduction in income. 

Regarding the first, he said development 
in a person's later years of a purpose for 
living was a challenge that must be met by 
everyone individually according to his needs 
and desires. "Because we are all individuals, 
no set formula or pattern can be applied 
to retirement; we can only generalize." 

For some, the answer might lie in con- 
tinuing to work as long as they were phys- 
ically and mentally capable of doing so. 
Since many persons derived their greatest 
satisfaction from their daily work, com- 
pulsory retirement for them might be a 
tragedy unless they could find another 
occupation that brings them the same satis- 
faction. There were some who could find 
the satisfaction they needed in the pursuit 
of a hobby, or even in another occupation. 
But there were people "who could never 
be happy or contented breaking completely 
with their regular occupations." 

No less an authority than Dr. Wilder 
Penfield, the eminent neuro-surgeon, the 
speaker pointed out, had advocated the 
development of a second career; he had 
himself set an example by becoming a 
novelist. 

Mr. Douse suggested that there was much 
church and social work to be done that 
for some older people offered an oppor- 
tunity to help others and to find an interest 
for themselves. 

But "the very act of deciding for yourself 
what is best for you is itself a challenge — 
a challenge to your imagination, your 
powers of self-analysis, and your judgment," 
Mr. Douse said. 



Referring to the provision of income for 
retirement, the speaker said that if older 
workers can continue in steady employ- 
ment "during the vital years from age 
40-65 they are more likely to reach retire- 
ment with adequate economic resources." 
In the Branch of which his Division is a 
part, "We have, therefore, concentrated on 
efforts to remove age discrimination in em- 
ployment against middle-aged and older 
workers," by urging employers to retain 
employees according to "capability and 
qualifications without regard to age, and 
to remove unnecessary upper age limits in 
their hiring policies." 

Mr. Douse suggested that for those who 
knew that they would have a smaller income 
after retirement it was a good plan to 
submit to voluntary retrenchment of ex- 
penditure for a few years before retirement. 
This had the double advantage of helping 
people to get used to spending less before 
they were actually obliged to do so, and 
also of allowing them to add to their 
savings. 

Government's Hiring Policy 

Mr. Douse said that besides appealing 
to private employers, the federal Govern- 
ment had set an example in its own hiring 
policy. The Civil Service Commission had 
announced in November that more men 
and women of 40 years of age or over are 
joining the Civil Service every year. In 
1961, 28.4 per cent of all appointments to 
the Service were in this age group, com- 
pared with 20 per cent in 1958 and 26.8 
per cent in 1960. 

In the clerical and related classes, persons 
over 40 represented 23.5 per cent of all 
new appointments; in administration and 
inspection, 42.1; in technical and profes- 
sional, 11.2; and in the manual, maintenance 
and service classes, 37.19 per cent. 

The Commission pointed out that there 
are now very few age limits for entrance 
to the public service. Those that once 
applied to clerks and other large groups 
were abolished some time ago. Those that 
remain apply to training classes such as 
Foreign Service Officer, and classes where 
physical fitness is of prime importance, such 
as Firefighter. 



36 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Women's Bureau 



University Enrolment of Canadian Women 

Faculty in which a girl enrols gives clue to her choice of future occupation 
Comparison of 1960-61 university enrolment with that in 1950-51 shows that 
girls continue to prepare for traditional women's occupations: teacher, nurse 



In so far as university enrolment by 
faculties is a clue to the professional dis- 
tribution of women in the labour force, the 
table below suggests slight if any changes 
in the immediate future. Over the years 
of this century, the proportion of all work- 
ing women who are engaged in professional 
services has remained at about 14 per cent, 
and nurses and teachers consistently have 
accounted for the majority. 

A comparison of the enrolment of 1960- 
61 with that a decade earlier shows that 
women students in education, preparing for 
the teaching profession, have multiplied 
both in numbers and as a percentage of 
the total, and still form the largest group. 
The only other significant increase is in 
pharmacy, where in 1960-61 women made 
up 21.6 per cent of the total compared with 
11.6 per cent in 1950-51. Other proportional 
as well as numerical increases occurred 
in dentistry, law, medicine and veterinary 
science, but were too slight to affect occu- 
pational distribution appreciably. 

Nor at the post high school, non-univer- 
sity level of education are there marked 
changes in the employment of girls. The 



Dominion Bureau of Statistics reports that, 
in October 1962, out of an enrolment of 
11,797 in publicly operated schools at this 
level, only 593 or 4.1 per cent were girls. 

The majority of these were aiming to- 
ward the more traditional fields of women's 
work: secretarial science, home economics 
and interior decorating. There were 30 in 
journalism and 23 in "radio and television 
arts." Business claimed a smaller number, 
who were in accountancy, merchandising, 
hotel or business administration. Some 62 
were enrolled in medical and industrial 
laboratory technology. Except for two in 
draughting technology, the only others who 
had ventured into courses requiring specific 
background in mathematics and science 
were three in electronic technology and 
four in industrial chemistry. 

Many explanations may be advanced for 
the predominance of traditional choices in 
women's occupational outlook. Perhaps most 
women are happier in the more accepted 
fields. 

Nevertheless it is pertinent to ask whether 
girls are made aware of other occupations 
or even the new possibilities in fields in 
which women have always worked. 



UNDERGRADUATE ENROLMENT OF WOMEN IN CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES 

(Source: Higher Education Section of Education Division, Dominion Bureau of Statistics) 





1950-1951 


1960-1961 


Faculty 


Number of 
women 


Women as 

percentage 

of total 


Number of 
women 


Women as 

percentage 

of total 




7,269 

669 

76 

28 

333 

6 

941 

19 

96 

274 

170 

12 


28.2 

16.5 
4.5 
4.2 
9.7 
.6 

41.7 

.2 

3.9 

6.2 

11.6 
2.4 


13,034 

1,401 

68 

17 

473 

48 

5,114 

66 

127 

401 

395 

25 


30.9 




17.0 




3.0 


Architecture 

Commerce 

Dentistry 


2.2 
7.2 
4.5 


Education 


48.0 




.4 


Law 


5.1 


Medicine 


9.4 


Pharmacy 


26.6 


Veterinary Science 


5.3 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



37 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



Collective Bargaining, Fourth Quarter, 1962 



During the fourth quarter of 1962, col- 
lective bargaining in Canada led to the 
signing of 51 major agreements covering 
approximately 76,000 employees. Among 
the new agreements negotiated during the 
period were contracts applying to employees 
in the iron and steel products, brewing, 
rubber, glass, transportation equipment and 
pulp and paper industries. Other major 
agreements were signed by employers in 
railway, truck, urban and water transpor- 
tation, grain storage, telephone communica- 
tions, gas and electric power distribution 
and metal mining. Extensive collective bar- 
gaining went forward during the quarter in 
the logging industry in Quebec and Ontario, 
where five major contracts were signed and 
eight agreements were under negotiation 
by the end of December. 

All but four of the major agreements 
negotiated during the period included general 
wage increases. The settlements granting no 
increases in basic wages, however, provided 
for improvements in such areas as premium 
pay, vacations, pensions, group life insur- 
ance, weekly indemnities, cost-of-living 
adjustments and employer contributions to 
welfare plans. 

In the last three months of 1962, the 
Steelworkers negotiated five major settle- 
ments. Three of these were with manufac- 
turers of iron and steel products and two 
covered approximately 1,000 miners in 
Quebec. 

In October, the Steelworkers completed 
negotiations for a two-year master agree- 
ment covering both hourly and salaried 
employees of Continental Can in Canada 
and the United States. In Canada, this agree- 
ment applies to production and maintenance 
workers, office and technical staffs at the 
company's plants in Toronto, Chatham and 
Vancouver. Besides wage increases totalling 
6 cents an hour for hourly employees and 
$2.40 a week for salaried personnel, this con- 
tract provides for pension benefits of $3.25 a 
month per year of credited service, 50 cents 
more than the previous formula, and a $2 
increase in the disability pension, raising 
benefits to $5 a month per year of service. 

The company's S.U.B. plan is also 
amended so that weekly unemployment 



benefits might reach a maximum of $76 
instead of the previous $50 for a worker 
with four dependants. Furthermore, em- 
ployees who work anytime during a week 
are to be entitled to 32 hours pay. Other 
provisions in the agreement, such as pre- 
ferential hiring rights at other company 
plants, relocation allowances for employees 
with ten or more years of service and early 
pensions for employees whose age plus 
length of service total 80, are to be applic- 
able in the event of plant shutdowns. 

An outstanding feature of the Continental 
Can settlement is a plan, taking effect in 
1964, that will allow a three-months leave 
of absence with pay for employees with 
15 or more years of service and thereafter 
at five-year intervals. 

At Lachine and Longue Pointe, Que., the 
Steelworkers reached a two-year settlement 
with Dominion Bridge which grants no 
general wage increase but provides for im- 
provements in welfare and insurance benefits 
as well as double time for hours worked 
in excess of 12 a day. A two-year agree- 
ment signed by the union with General 
Steel Wares and its subsidiary Easy Washing 
Machine Company grants a total wage in- 
crease of 7 cents an hour to employees in 
London, Toronto and Montreal; under this 
agreement the employer and employees are 
each to contribute 3 cents an hour toward 
group insurance and pension plan improve- 
ments. 

In the mining industry, the Steelworkers 
concluded three-year agreements with Nor- 
metal Mining and Queinont Mining in 
Quebec on terms similar to those negotiated 
with Noranda Mines last September. The 
agreements grant two annual wage increases 
of 2i per cent and incorporate a wage 
increase of at least 5 cents an hour given 
by the companies prior to settlement. 

In mid-October, the Ontario Labour Rela- 
tions Board certified the Steelworkers as 
bargaining agent for approximately 15,000 
employees of the International Nickel Com- 
pany at Sudbury who had hitherto been 
represented by the Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers. Certification was granted by a 
two-to-one decision of the Board, the dis- 
senting member contending that the Steel- 



This review is prepared by the Collective Bargaining Section, Labour-Management 
Division, of the Economics and Research Branch. 



33 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



workers had violated a no-propaganda regu- 
lation within 72 hours of a pre-hearing 
representation vote conducted last February. 

The Steelworkers opened negotiations at 
Sudbury on October 25 and presented 
proposals similar to those already under 
consideration at the company's Port Col- 
borne refinery, where the union had dis- 
placed the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers 
in December 1961. In November, the 
management and the union agreed to include 
the Port Colborne union representatives in 
the Sudbury talks. According to newspaper 
reports, the Steelworkers' proposals included 
job and income security measures such as 
an S.U.B. plan, severance pay, improve- 
ments in the pension plan and a proposal 
to change the seniority structure to facilitate 
movement of employees from one Inco 
division to another. 

At Falconbridge Nickel Mines, where 
active bargaining had been suspended dur- 
ing the Steelworkers' campaign to enroll 
the company's employees, the Mine, Mill 
and Smelter Workers opened negotiations 
in October to renew a contract that had 
expired on March 31, 1962. This followed 
the Steelworkers' withdrawal in July of 
their application for bargaining rights. 

In the brewing industry, the Brewery 
Workers and Dow Brewery signed a new 
agreement covering approximately 800 em- 
ployees in Montreal and Quebec City. The 
settlement included terms along the pattern 
set by the union and the brewing industry 
in Ontario earlier in the year. In addition 
to hourly wage increases of 6 cents retro- 
active to January 1962, 8 cents effective 
January 1963 and 8 cents to be granted a 
year later, the company agreed to adopt 
an S.U.B. plan providing weekly benefits 
of $45 in the first year of the agreement, 
$46 in the second year and $47 in the third 
year for single employees ($55, $56 and 
$57 for married employees), payable for 
10 to 52 weeks, depending on length of 
service. 

Molson's Brewery agreed to raise wages 
by 71 per cent for about 1,000 employees 
in Montreal represented by the Molson's 
Employees Association. This increase, retro- 
active to January 1962, was negotiated in 
accordance with a wage reopener in an 
existing three-year contract that will expire 
September 29, 1963. 

A strike of more than 1,000 employees 
in the tire manufacturing industry was 
averted in October when the Rubber Work- 
ers and Dominion Rubber reached a settle- 
ment at Kitchener, Ont. Negotiations had 
been in progress since February. The union 
was seeking a wage increase of 6 cents an 
hour, improved seniority provisions and a 
reduction in the qualifying period for four 



weeks vacation from 25 to 22 years of 
service. During the summer, a conciliation 
board heard presentations from the parties 
and released a majority report suggesting 
that the parties further examine every pos- 
sible area for settlement. The union nominee 
on the board recommended a wage increase 
of 5 cents an hour for one year, which was 
the pattern followed by other rubber manu- 
facturers in 1962. Talks continued after a 
strike vote and produced a one-year agree- 
ment giving no wage increases but provid- 
ing for four weeks vacation after 22 years 
of service. Accompanying this contract was 
a three-year supplemental agreement that 
provides for a supplementary pension pay- 
able between ages 65 and 70, a higher 
basic pension, increases in group life insur- 
ance for employees active and retired, 
higher S.U.B. and the establishment of a 
separation pay plan. 

Three major collective agreements were 
signed in the glass manufacturing industry 
during the quarter. Two of these contracts 
were negotiated at the Montreal and Hamil- 
ton plants of Dominion Glass by the Glass 
and Ceramic Workers. They provide for 
wage increases totalling 19 cents an hour 
over three years, an increase in the evening 
and night shift premiums to 7 cents and 9 
cents respectively from the previous 6 cents 
and 8 cents, three weeks vacation after 12 
years of service (after 15 years under the 
previous contract) and higher company 
contributions toward medical insurance 
plans. 

The settlements at Dominion Glass ended 
work stoppages that had begun at both 
plants in August. At the Montreal plant, 
approximately 1,200 employees had been 
idle for eight weeks by the time a settle- 
ment was reached late in October. The union 
and the management at Hamilton signed a 
memorandum of agreement on November 
1, ending an 11 -week strike of 1,100 em- 
ployees. 

In December, another settlement in the 
glass industry was concluded by the United 
Auto Workers and Duplate Canada Limited 
in Oshawa. The parties agreed to a total 
base rate increase of 16 cents an hour over 
a period of three years; a 2-cent increase 
in shift premiums, raising the evening and 
night shift premiums to 10 cents and 12 
cents respectively; higher group insurance 
and sickness and accident benefits; short 
work week benefits; and changes in the 
vacation plan. 

The UAW also negotiated three major 
agreements in the transportation equipment 
industry. At Chatham, Ont., the union 
signed a three-year contract that provides 
for three annual increases of 6 cents an 
hour for International Harvester employees. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



39 



Elsewhere in the transportation equip- 
ment industry, a 2 8 -month agreement that 
averted a threatened strike was concluded 
with Canadian Car at Fort William, Ont. 
Although no general wage increase is 
granted under this agreement, provision is 
made for certain classification adjustments 
and a change in the cost-of-living allow- 
ance formula that will add approximately 
2 cents an hour to current wages. More- 
over, the company's pension plan is to be 
non-contributory, with benefits amounting 
to $2 a month per year of service. Canadian 
Car also agreed to pay the anticipated 
increase in P.S.I, premiums and to make 
larger contributions toward a hospital, life 
insurance and sickness and accident plan. 

In December, the United Auto Workers 
concluded an agreement of 30 months dura- 
tion with Canadian Acme Screw and Gear, 
Monroe Acme, Gait Machine and Mare- 
mont Acme at Toronto. Under this con- 
tract, wage increases total 11 cents an hour 
for male day workers, 13 cents an hour 
for female day workers and 15 cents an 
hour for skilled trades. Other provisions 
include an increase in group life insurance 
to $3,500 from the previous $2,800 for male 
employees — coverage remains at $1,000 for 
female workers — and a weekly indemnity 
increase from $30 to $40. 

By December, the last four major col- 
lective agreements in the pulp and paper 
industry in Quebec and Ontario that had 
expired in 1962 were renewed. Two of 
the settlements were negotiated by the Pulp 
and Paper Workers' Federation (CNTU) in 
Quebec. The union signed a two-year agree- 
ment with Consolidated Paper at Port 
Alfred providing for a wage increase of 
5 cents an hour, additional classification 
adjustments and a wage reopener in the 
second year of the contract. The other 
agreement, negotiated with Domtar Pulp 
and Paper (Craft and Box Board Division) 
at East Angus, raises wages by 4 cents 
an hour. This contract is to be for a term 
of 20 months but contains the proviso that 
such additional monetary items as will be 
negotiated with Canada Paper in the com- 
ing months will be applied to Domtar 
employees at East Angus. 

The other two settlements in the pulp 
and paper industry were negotiated by the 
Paper Makers and the Pulp and Paper Mill 
Workers, who signed one-year agreements 
with Consolidated Paper at Grand'Mere, 
Que., where wages are to rise by 5 cents 
an hour, and with Dryden Paper, Dryden, 
Ont., which agreed to a wage increase of 
4 cents an hour. 

In three of the pulp and paper industry 
agreements, afternoon and night shift prem- 
iums were increased to 7 cents and 10 cents 



respectively and two agreements reduced 
the qualifying period for four weeks vaca- 
tion from 25 to 23 years of service. 

On October 27, the Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen and the CPR reached a 
settlement two days before a strike deadline 
set by the union earlier in the month. 
R. A. Emerson, CPR Vice-President, had 
stated that a walkout by the Trainmen 
would immediately halt all traffic and would 
mean the layoff of 60,000 other CPR 
employees. As the strike date approached, 
the company issued layoff notices to its 
employees. The company and the union 
continued negotiations, however, and the 
CPR offered to increase wages by 8 per 
cent over 31 months and to adopt the 
majority recommendations concerning work 
rules made by the conciliation board. The 
union believed that the proposed changes 
in work rules would cost some of its 
members more than they would gain 
through the wage increase and that amend- 
ments to work rules should be negotiated 
individually. Negotiations went forward with 
the assistance of a mediator, W. H. Dickie, 
and resulted in a 31 -month agreement 
similar to that concluded by the Trainmen 
and the CNR last May. Under the con- 
tract, the wages of approximately 6,000 
CPR conductors, brakemen, yardmen and 
switch tenders are to be increased by 8 
per cent in five steps and the qualifying 
period for four weeks vacation is to be 
reduced to 25 from 35 years of service. 
As to changes in work rules, 16 recom- 
mendations of the conciliation board are 
to be implemented in full, two were accepted 
with some modification and one is to be 
resolved at a later date. 

Five major agreements covering nearly 
5,000 workers were concluded elsewhere 
in the transportation industry and related 
sectors. In British Columbia, the Street 
Railway Employees negotiated a two-year 
contract providing for two annual wage 
increases of 7 cents an hour for 2,000 
transit employees of the B.C. Hydro and 
Power Authority. 

The Railway Clerks signed two major 
contracts during the quarter. One agree- 
ment, with several elevator companies at 
Fort William and Port Arthur, Ont., pro- 
vides for annual wage increases of 2\ per 
cent over two years, raising the labourer's 
rate by 11 cents an hour. The union also 
signed a three-year agreement with the 
National Harbours Board in Montreal that 
grants a total general wage increase of 18 
cents an hour and classification adjustments 
ranging from 2 cents an hour for labourers to 
7 cents an hour for snow plough operators. 

A three-year contract applying to em- 
ployees of trucking companies in northern 



40 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Ontario was signed by the Teamsters. The 
companies agreed to increase wages by 23 
to 25 cents an hour and to increase com- 
pany contributions toward health and wel- 
fare insurance from $8 to $12 a month per 
employee. It was further agreed that the 
employers and employees would each make 
monthly contributions of $3 in 1962, $4 in 
1963 and $5 in 1964 toward a pension plan. 

In Newfoundland, the Railway, Transport 
and General Workers signed an agreement 
with Canadian National Newfoundland 
Steamship Service. This agreement is for a 
period of five years, a longer term than 
any other major contract negotiated in 
1962. It provides for three annual wage 
increases of $9.58 a month and two annual 
increases of $9.57 a month, raising the 
seaman's wage to $284.79 a month. The 
total negotiated wage increase for a seaman 
amounts to 28 cents an hour. 

During the quarter, five major agree- 
ments were concluded in the telephone 
communications industry. In October, New 
Brunswick Telephone and the IBEW signed 
a two-year agreement covering 550 traffic 
employees that raises wages by an average 
of 7.8 per cent in two steps and lowers 
the qualifying period for four weeks vaca- 
tion from 35 to 31 years of service. 

In November, Bell Telephone concluded 
four collective agreements that affect 
approximately 8,000 clerical and associated 
workers, nearly 500 communications sales 
employees, and 9,700 employees in crafts 
and services represented by the Canadian 
Telephone Employees Association (Ind.) and 
more than 8,000 telephone operators whose 
bargaining agent is the Traffic Employees 
Association (Ind.). The wage increases 
agreed to in these settlements average 
approximately 3 per cent for one year. In 
addition, improvements were made to the 
vacation plan for employees who take their 
annual leave outside July and August. Vaca- 
tions taken in July and August are to 
remain at two weeks after one year of 
service, three weeks after 15 years of service 
and four weeks after 30 years of service. 

Other negotiations in this industry went 
forward between the IBEW and Alberta 
Government Telephones and Maritime Tele- 
graph and Telephone, and between the 



Communications Workers and Saskatchewan 
Government Telephones. 

Major settlements reached during the 
quarter in the gas and power industry 
affected approximately 3,000 employees. In 
Ontario, Consumers' Gas and the Chemical 
Workers signed a three-year agreement 
providing for wage increases totalling 19 
cents an hour and an increase in group 
life insurance to $5,000 from the previous 
$3,000. Joint negotiations in the Alberta 
natural gas industry produced a one-year 
agreement between two Employees Asso- 
ciations and Canadian Western Natural Gas 
and Northwestern Utilities, with no pro- 
vision for a wage increase. In Quebec, a 
wage increase of 14 cents an hour was 
negotiated by the Employees Association 
of Shawinigan Water and Power under a 
wage reopener clause in the existing con- 
tract, due to expire in October 1963. 

In the last three months of 1962, collec- 
tive bargaining was extensive in the logging 
industry in Quebec and Ontario, where 
major agreements applying to approximately 
14,000 workers were under negotiation. In 
Quebec, nearly 5,700 loggers were affected 
by five settlements. Two of these were 
concluded by the Pulp and Paper Workers' 
Federation (CNTU) and Consolidated Paper; 
they are of two years duration and provide 
for a general wage increase of 8 cents an 
hour, classification adjustments and in- 
creases in piece rates. 

The Bush Workers' section of the Farm- 
ers' Union in Quebec negotiated a three-year 
contract that gives three annual wage 
increases of 4 per cent to Price Brothers' 
employees, and a two-year agreement em- 
bodying wage increases of 3 to 6 per cent 
with John Murdock. In December, the 
union signed a contract of 15 months dura- 
tion with Domtar Newsprint (Woodland 
Division) providing for wage increases of 
10 to 35 cents an hour. Included in these 
settlements were increases in piece rates. 

In Ontario, the Carpenters (Lumber and 
Sawmill Workers) were bargaining on behalf 
of 8,000 woods employees of several pulp 
and paper companies. Negotiations had 
begun in August and September. The largest 
bargaining unit, that of Abitibi Power and 
Paper, was nearing a settlement in December. 



Collective Bargaining Scene 



Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During January, February and March 

(except those under negotiation in December) 

Company and Location Union 

Atomic Energy of Canada, Chalk River & Deep 

River, Ont Atomic Energy Allied Council 

CLC) 
B.C. Hydro & Power Authority I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 



(AFL-CIO/ 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 

63569-8—4 



41 



Company and Location Union 

CBC, company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CBC, company-wide Radio & T.V. Empl. (ARTEC) (Ind.) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Consumers Glass, Toronto, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dairies (various), Vancouver & New Westmin- 
ster, B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

Fairey Aviation, Eastern Passage, N.S Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (office empl.) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Lever Bros., Toronto, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical & main- 
tenance empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (electrical craft 

empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Moirs Ltd. & Moirs Sales, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Miramichi Lumber, Chatham Industries & others, 

Miramichi ports, N.B Miramichi Trades & Labour (Ind.) 

New Brunswick Power Commission, province- 
wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Noranda Copper & Brass, Montreal, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Quebec North Shore Paper, Baie Comeau, Fran- 

quelin & Shelter Bay, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

St. Boniface General Hospital, St. Boniface, Man. Empl. Union of Hospital Institutions (Ind.) 

Saskatchewan Government Sask. Govt. Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (labour service 

empl.) 

Silverwood Dairies, Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Stanrock Uranium Mines, Elliot Lake, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Telegram Publishing, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During December 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Alberta Government Telephones I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

American Can, Hamilton, Simcoe, Ont. & Mont- 
real, Que CLC-chartered local 

Asbestos Corp. & others, Thetford Mines, Que. Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 
Assn. des Marchands Detaillants, Quebec & dis- 
trict, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) (garage 

empl.) 

B.A. Oil, Clarkson, Ont OH Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., New Westminster, Burnaby, 

Fraser Valley, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (beverage dis- 
pensers) 

B.C. Hydro & Power Authority I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hydro & Power Authority Office Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Breweries (various), Winnipeg, Man Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Bristol Aero-Industries, Winnipeg, Man Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.P.R., system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) (dining car staff) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Calgary General Hospital, Calgary, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

Calgary Power & Farm Electric Services, Alta. Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Canada & Dominion Sugar, Montreal, Que Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Canadair, St. Laurent, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Industries, Brownsburg, Que Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Farnham, Quebec & Vic- 

toriaville, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Continental Can, St. Laurent, Que CLC-chartered local 

David & Frere, Montreal, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

DeHavilland Aircraft, Toronto, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Coal, Glace Bay, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dominion Steel & Coal (Cdn. Bridge), Walker- 

ville, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Sydney, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Trenton, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Donohue Bros., Clermont, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring & two others, 

Toronto, Ont I.L.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Falconbridge Nickel, Falconbridge, Ont. Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

42 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Company and Location Union 

H. J. Heinz, Leamington, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (4), Trois Rivieres, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Iron Ore of Can., Nfld. & Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Rolling Mill, Selkirk, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. & Eastern Electric, com- 
pany-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

Maritime Tel. & Tei., company-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Men's Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Toronto, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Millinery Mfrs. Assn., Montreal, Que Hatters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal City, Que Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. Fed. (CNTU) (inside 

empl.) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont. & Montreal, 

Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (plant empl.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Office Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Old Sydney Collieries, Sydney Mines, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Saint John Shipbuilding & Dry Dock, Saint John, 

N.B Various unions 

Saskatchewan Government Telephone Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Sask. Provincial Hospitals, Moose Jaw, North 

Battleford, Prince Albert & Weyburn, Sask CLC-chartered local & Public Service Empl. 

(CLC) 

Shell Oil, Montreal East, Que Empl. Council (Ind.) 

Shipping Federation, Halifax, N.S., Saint John, 

N.B., Montreal, Quebec & Three Rivers, Que. I.L.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

TCA, Canada-wide Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Star, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver Board of Police Commissioners, Van- 
couver, B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) 

Wabasso Cotton, Welland, Ont United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg General Hospital, Winnipeg, Man Public Empl. (CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Bldg. mtce. & window cleaning contractors, 

Vancouver, B.C Bldg. Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Burnaby District, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) 

Cdn. Lithographers' Assn., Eastern Canada Lithographers (Ind.) 

Council of Printing Industries, Toronto, Ont Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort William, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

International Nickel, Sudbury, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Kimberly-Clark & Spruce Falls Paper, Kapus- 

kasing & Longlac, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Marathon Corp., Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Northern Forest Products, Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Outboard Marine, Peterborough, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Corp., Nipigon, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

Abitibi Power & Paper, northern Ontario Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Shipping Federation, various ports Longshoremen & Warehousemen (CLC) 

Hotel Chateau Laurier (C.N.R.), Ottawa, Ont. Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Empress (C.P.R.), Victoria, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Northern Electric (western region), Toronto, Ont. Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (shop, 

warehouse & installation empl.) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

International Nickel, Port Colborne, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Hospitals (11), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(inside empl.) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 43 

63569-8—41 



Company and Location Union 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(outside empl.) 

Work Stoppage 

Que. Iron & Titanium, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Shawinigan Chemicals, Shawinigan, Que CNTU-chartered local 

Part III — Settlements Reached During December 1962 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures 
on the number of employees covered are approximate.) 

Cdn. Acme Screw & Gear, Monroe Acme, Galt Machine & Maremont Acme, Toronto, 
Ont. — Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 30-mo. agreement covering 800 empl. — settlement pay 
of $20 prorated; wage increases of 60 an hr. eff. Nov. 16, 1962 and 50 an hr. eff. Nov. 16, 
1963 for male day wkrs.; wage increases of 80 an hr. eff. Nov. 16, 1962 and 50 an hr. eff. 
Nov. 16, 1963 for female day wkrs.; base rate increase of 50 an hr. eff. Nov. 16, 1962 for male 
and female incentive wkrs.; wage increases of 100 an hr. eff. Nov. 16, 1962 and 50 an hr. eff. 
Nov. 15, 1963 for skilled trades; 50 of 70 cost-of-living allowance incorporated into wage rates; 
base for operation of cost-of-living allowance formula (10 for each .6 point change in consumer 
price index) raised to 129.6 (formerly 127.2); off-shift premium increased to 90 (formerly 80); 
company-paid group life insurance increased to $3,500 (formerly $2,800) for male empl., 
unchanged at $1,000 for female empl.; company-paid weekly indemnity insurance increased to 
$40 a wk. (formerly $30 a wk.) with maximum benefit period remaining at 26 wks.; bereavement 
pay of up to 3 days for death in immediate family if employee attends funeral; jury duty pay 
introduced; general labourer's rate after Nov. 16, 1963 will be $2.02 an hr. 

Cdn. Copper Refiners, Montreal, Que.— -Metal Rfining Wkrs. Union (Ind.): 3-yr. 
agreement covering 1,000 empl. — general wage increases of 50 an hr. eff. Dec. 3, 1962, 40 an hr. 
eff. Dec. 3, 1963 and 40 an hr. eff. Dec. 3, 1964; evenng and night shift premiums increased to 
80 and 110 respectively (formerly 70 and 90); Sunday premium increased to 150 an hr. (formerly 
100 an hr.) for straight-time work. 

Domtar Newsprint (Woodland Drv.), Dolbeau, Que. — Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union 
(Ind.): 15-mo. agreement covering 800 empl. — wage increases of 100 to 350 an hr. eff. Dec. 17, 
1962; piece rate increase of $1.40 a cord eff. Dec. 17, 1962; time and one half after 54 hrs. 
of work per wk.; log drivers to receive time and one quarter after 9 hrs. of work per day and 
time and one half after 54 hrs. of work per wk.; union shop; labourer's rate $1.25 an hr. 

Domtar Pulp & Paper (formerly St. Lawrence Corp.), East Angus, Que. — Pulp & Paper 
Wkrs. Federation (CNTU): 20-mo agreement covering 500 empl. — general wage increase of 
40 an hr. and nearly 20 classification adjustments eff. Jan. 1, 1963; 3 floating holidays (formerly 
2 floating holidays); 4 wks. vacation after 23 yrs. of service (formerly after 25 yrs.); employer to 
contribute 500 a mo. additional to sickness insurance plan; contract provides that monetary 
items yet to be negotiated by Canada Paper in May 1963 will be applied to this agreement. 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont. — Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & Paper Mill 
Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 1-yr. agreement covering 700 empl. — general wage increase of 40 an 
hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1963; evening and night shift premiums increased to 70 and 100 respectively 
(formerly 60 and 90); 4 wks. vacation after 23 yrs. of service (formerly after 25 yrs.). 

Duplate Canada, Oshawa, Ont. — Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement covering 
600 empl. — wage increases of 40 an hr. eff. Sept. 6, 1962, 60 an hr. eff. Sept. 6, 1963 and 60 
an hr. eff. Sept. 6, 1964; wage increases of 120 to 150 an hr. for skilled tradesmen; 80 of cost-of- 
living allowance incorporated into wage rates; evening and night shift premiums increased to 
100 and 120 respectively (formerly 80 and 100); 4 hrs. off with pay prior to Christmas and New 
Year's Day supersedes Civic Holiday; time and one half for work performed on Civic Holiday 
and double time plus 1 day's pay (previously time and on half plus 1 day's pay) for work 
performed on other paid holidays; 1 wk. vacation with 2% of annual earnings maintained for empl. 
with less than 3 yrs. of service; 2 wks. vacation with 4% of annual earnings after 3 yrs. of 
service and 5% of annual earnings after 8 yrs. of service; 3 wks. vacation with 6% of annual 
earnings after 10 yrs. of service (formerly 2 wks. vacation with 4% of annual earnings after 3 
yrs. of service and 3 wks. vacation with 6% of annual earnings after 13 yrs. of service); short 
work wk. benefit introduced; group life insurance increased to $6,000 (formerly $4,000); weekly 
indemnity increased to $60 (formerly $45); improvements in accident and dismemberment 
indemnity and pension plans; employer to pay 50% of hospital and medical insurance premiums 
for pensioners; 3 days' bereavement leave for death in immediate family (spouse, children and 
parents); maximum jury duty allowance increased to $10 a day up to 60 days in a calendar 
yr. (formerly $5 a day up to 14 days in a calendar year). 

Lakehead terminal elevators, Fort William & Port Arthur, Ont. — Railway Clerks 
(AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,100 empl. — wage increases of 2i% eff. Jan. 1, 
1963 and 2\% of 1962 rates eff. Jan. 1, 1964; 3 wks. vacation after 10 yrs. of service (formerly 
after 15 yrs.); provision for 1 wk. additional for vacations taken in Jan., Feb., and March 
deleted from agreement; employers continue to pay 50% of medical and hospital insurance 
premiums, with upper limit of $6.90 a mo. removed; labourer's rate after Jan. 1, 1964 will be 
$2.14 an hr. 

Ottawa Crvic Hospital, Ottawa, Ont. — Public Empl. (CLC): 1-yr. agreement from 
Jan. 1, 1962 to Dec. 31, 1962 covering 1,250 empl, — arbitration award granting a general wage 
increase of $2.75 a wk. eff. Jan. 1, 1962; for empl. hired since May 15, 1961, starting rates 
to be equivalent to those eff. after 6 months of service under the previous agreement; maximum 
rates attainable after 3 yrs. of service (formerly after 4 yrs.); Boxing Day to be a paid holiday 
(formerly if proclaimed by the city of Ottawa); time and one half plus holiday pay for work 

{Continued on page 45) 

44 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



Tripartite Technical Meeting for Printing and Allied Trades 



Technological changes frequently require 
adjustments to the number, distribution and 
qualifications of workers in a particular 
undertaking. Every effort should be made 
by employers and workers to find and put 
into effect measures that will enable work- 
ers whose jobs are changing or disappearing 
to continue in employment, it was sug- 
gested by the Tripartite Technical Meeting 
for the Printing and Allied Trades on the 
particular problems that arise in the 
printing industry in developing countries. 
The meeting, from November 12 to 23, 
was convened by the International Labour 
Organization. Government, employers' and 
workers' delegates from 18 countries par- 
ticipated. 

The meeting believed that careful con- 
sideration should be given in each country, 
in the light of its economic and social 
circumstances, to the alternative of less 
expensive equipment, requiring more manual 
workers, as opposed to more modern equip- 
ment with fewer job opportunities. 

The conclusions adopted by the meeting 
noted that the future growth of the printing 
and allied industries in developing countries 
will create substantial demands for skilled 
manpower. At the same time, modernization 
may cause a change in the distribution of 
the skills required. 



Vocational training, the meeting believed, 
is a responsibility that should be shared by 
governments with the representatives of em- 
ployers' and workers' organizations. Train- 
ing facilities and programs should take 
full account of new processes and equipment 
which have been introduced or are likely to 
be introduced. The opinion was expressed 
that, in order to meet the changes arising 
from technological progress, accelerated 
training techniques can be useful for ad- 
vanced training or for the retraining of 
workers who might otherwise face displace- 
ment. It is desirable, also, to develop 
programs for skilled workmen and tech- 
nicians involving training in a foreign 
country. 

Other conclusions concerned training in 
management development, choice of ma- 
chinery and problems of small firms. 

The meeting also adopted a series of 
conclusions concerning the protection of 
workers' health in the printing and allied 
trades. 

In its conclusions, the meeting considered 
it essential that in developing countries, 
governments should accord a priority to 
the printing and allied trades and should 
ensure to these trades such resources and 
facilities of all kinds as are necessary for 
their development and for their moderniza- 
tion. 



Algeria Becomes 104th ILO Member Country 



Admitted to the United Nations on 
October 8, Algeria became a member of the 
International Labour Organization on Octo- 
ber 19. The admission of Algeria brings to 
104 the number of ILO member countries. 



Algeria has stated that it remains bound 
by the obligations of 42 International 
Labour Conventions the provisions of which 
had previously been made applicable to 
Algeria by France. 



Collective Bargaining Scene 



(Continued from page 44} 
performed on a paid holiday if an empl. receives no alternative day off within 40 days (formerly 
alternative time off only); cash allowance for up to 4 mos. accumulated sick leave to be granted 
to retiring employees (formerly leave equivalent to a maximum of 4 mos. accumulated sick 
leave was allowed immediately prior to retirement); employer to pay half of the cost of a group 
life insurance plan providing for a death benefit of li times employees' annual wages; orderly's 
starting rate $53.25 a wk. 

Winnipeg City, Man. — Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 1-yr. agreement covering 500 
empl. — wage increase yet to be negotiated with the Public Service Empl. will be applied to 
this agreement; service pay to be $6 a mo. after 10 yrs. of service (formerly 100 a calendar day) 
and $9 a mo. after 15 yrs. of service (formerly 200 a calendar day). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



45 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



Feedback of information from employees 
to management is vital to the health of 
industry, asserts Fernand Boyer, production 
manager of the container division, Standard 
Paper Box Manufacturing Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. "If management doesn't have this level 
of contact with employees, it should run 
after it," he advises. "Management needs 
the confidence of the employee; otherwise 
molehills can become mountains." 

There was a time when Standard's Labour- 
Management Committee devoted its atten- 
tion primarily to production efficiency, care 
of equipment and associated manufacturing 
problems. Today the emphasis is on labour- 
management co-operation and communica- 
tions. 

Mr. Boyer stated that joint consultation 
had saved his firm a lot of money during 
the past five years but that the plant 
LMC's greatest contribution was the way 
it improved relations between employees 
and management. 

Asked what he would recommend that 
management do to make joint consultation 
succeed, he replied: "Management must 
want it to succeed. Management must see 
to it that top brass regularly attends LMC 
meetings. Otherwise employees will conclude 
that the idea isn't important. If you want 
top-drawer relations, then top brass must 
set the pace." 

Production superintendent Jean Marie 
Ratte believes that the man on the job can 
improve on anything that is put in front 
of him — if management will give him the 
opportunity. "In our experience, no matter 
how much management planning and fore- 
sight have gone into a new piece of plant 
equipment or a new production procedure, 
the employees most closely connected with 
its operation have begun suggesting im- 
provements right away — sometimes even 
before the thing is installed," explained 
Mr. Ratte. Joint consultation at Standard 
Paper Box now invites the employee's point 
of view before, not after, plant changes 
have been made. 

Follow-through on accepted employee 
proposals for alterations and innovations 
in equipment and procedure is persistent. 
When the final changes have been made, a 
management representative goes directly to 
the employee concerned and asks him: Are 



you satisfied? Is it everything you wanted? 
Only if the employee answers "yes" to both 
questions is the project listed in the Labour- 
Management Committee minutes as "com- 
pleted." 

Roger Carbonneau, personnel manager 
at Standard Paper Box and an industrial 
relations graduate of the University of 
Montreal, told Department of Labour repre- 
sentatives that he would prefer to see joint 
consultation "advance through the example 
of those who practise it and are convinced 
of its value" rather than have it forced on 
Canadian industry by legislation. 

Consultation and co-operation between 
industry's two giants would one day be 
universal throughout this country, he pre- 
dicted. "Those individuals who resist the 
idea will eventually see — as we have — that 
joint consultation pays off not only in 
greatly improved labour-management rela- 
tions but in dollars and cents as well. If 
they cannot be won over on moral grounds, 
they will be impelled to do so for economic 
reasons," said Mr. Carbonneau. 

Fernand Carpentier, a truck driver with 
Standard Paper Box and a member of the 
firm's labour-management committee, stated 
that fear can be replaced by understanding 
if labour and management have some form 
of regular contact with each other. "We 
have had a few members who were afraid 
to attend labour-management meetings when 
their turn came along," he said. "But it 
took just one meeting to put them straight, 
to make them see that management was 
very human and understanding." Mr. Car- 
pentier added that after this particular 
problem was overcome by joint consultation, 
a "family atmosphere" developed in the 
plant. 

Mr. Carpentier stated there is strong union 
enthusiasm and support for the committee. 
The 200 production employees are members 
of the Cardboard and Corrugated Paper 
Workers Union (CNTU) and are repre- 
sented on the LMC by seven fellow-workers 
— one each from the corrugator, printing, 
specialty, die cutting, finishing, shipping and 
maintenance departments. "Joint consulta- 
tion is responsible for cultivating the good 
relations we have here — and for maintaining 
them," said Mr. Carpentier. 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres, who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
rums. 



46 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for two days during November. The Board 
issued three certificates designating bargain- 
ing agents, ordered one representation vote, 
and rejected two applications for certifica- 
tion. 

During the month the Board received six 
applications for certification, one application 
for revocation of certification, and allowed 
the withdrawal of three applications for 
certification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. Truckers, Cartagemen, and Building 
Material Employees Local Union No. 362, 
General Drivers, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers Local No. 979, General Truck Drivers 
Union Local No. 938, General Truck 
Drivers and Helpers Union Local No. 31, 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers of America, on behalf of a unit of 
employees of Pacific Inland Express Ltd., 
Calgary, Alta. (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1386). 

2. Canadian Air Line Flight Attendants' 
Association, on behalf of a unit of steward- 
esses employed by TransAir Limited, Win- 
nipeg, Man. (L.G., Nov. 1962, p. 1283). 

3. National Harbours Board Police Asso- 
ciation, Port of Saint John, on behalf of 
a unit of harbour police employed by the 
National Harbours Board, Saint John, N.B. 
(L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1387). 

Representation Vote Ordered 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
applicant, the New York Central Railroad 
Company Lessee of the Michigan Central 
Railroad and Sub-lessee of The Canada 
Southern Railway, respondent, and Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Firemen and Engine- 
men, intervener (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1386). 
The Board directed that the names of the 
applicant and intervener be on the ballot 



in the vote, which affected a unit of loco- 
motive engineers employed by the company 
in the Canada Division of its Northern 
District (Returning Officer: T. B. McRae). 

Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. Seafarers' International Union of Can- 
ada, applicant, and Porter Shipping Limited, 
Toronto, Ont., respondent (L.G., Dec. 1962, 
p. 1386). The application was rejected for 
the reason that the Board was not satisfied 
that the applicant had as members in good 
standing a majority of the employees 
affected. On the evidence, at least one 
employee in the unit who had signed an 
application for membership and paid fees 
to the applicant in an unsuccessful applica- 
tion made in 1961 affecting unlicensed 
employees of the respondent had had his 
1961 payment returned to him at the time 
he signed a new application for member- 
ship in connection with the present applica- 
tion and this money was then returned to 
the representative of the applicant as pay- 
ment of fees for purposes of membership 
in support of the present application. The 
Board found that this method of payment 
does not accord with the Rules of the 
Board and this one instance in itself des- 
troyed the applicant's majority. 

2. International Longshoremen's and 
Warehousemen's Union, Local 509, Ca- 
nadian Area, applicant, and Northland 
Terminals Co. Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., 
respondent (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1387). 
The application was rejected for the reason 
that it was not supported by a majority 
of the employees in the unit found appro- 
priate for collective bargaining. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. International Union, United Automo- 
bile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement 
Workers, of America (UAW), Local 698, 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



47 



Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The branch 
also acts as the administrative arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board in matters 
under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
which became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions, orders and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
works declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the province of Saskatch- 
ewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



on behalf of a unit of employees of Com- 
pagnie Nationale Air France, Montreal 
(Investigating Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

2. Seafarers' International Union of 
Canada, on behalf of a unit of unlicensed 
personnel of The Irving Oil Company, 
Saint John, N.B. (Investigating Officers: 
H. R. Pettigrove and R. L. Fournier). 

3. Taggart Employees Association on 
behalf of a unit of employees of Taggart 
Service Limited, Ottawa, Ont, and Inaerco 
Limited, Perth, Ont. (Investigating Officer: 
G. E. Plant). ) 

4. Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers Local No. 91 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of Amer- 
ica, on behalf of a unit of mail truck 
drivers employed by Rod Service (Ottawa) 
Limited, Ottawa, Ont. (Investigating Offi- 
cer: G. A. Lane). 



5. Seafarers' International Union of Can- 
ada on behalf of a unit of marine engineers 
employed by Irving Oil Company Limited, 
Saint John, N.B. (Investigating Officers: 
H. R. Pettigrove and R. L. Fournier). 

6. Canadian Merchant Service Guild, 
Inc., on behalf of a unit of deck officers 
employed by Law Quarries Transportation 
Limited, Port Colborne, Ont. (Investigating 
Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

Application for Revocation Received 

P. G. Robertson, H. R. Douglas, et al, 
applicants, Trans-Canada Air Lines, Mont- 
real, Que., respondent, and the International 
Association of Machinists, respondent. The 
application was for the revocation of the 
certification issued by the Board on October 
2, 1961 to the International Association of 
Machinists in respect of a unit of produc- 
tion planners employed by Trans-Canada 
Air Lines (L.G. 1961, p. 1147). 



48 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Applicants for Certification Withdrawn 

1. Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc., 
applicant, and Law Quarries Transportation 
Limited, Port Colborne, Ont., respondent 
(L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1387) (New applica- 
tion received, see above). 

2. Seafarers' International Union of Can- 
ada, applicant, and Kent Line Ltd. (Irving 
Oil Company), Saint John, N.B., respond- 



ent (unlicensed personnel) (L.G., Dec. 
1962, p. 1387) (New application received, 
see above). 

3. Seafarers' International Union of Can- 
ada, applicant, and Kent Line Ltd. (Irving 
Oil Company), Saint John, N.B., respond- 
ent (marine engineers) (L.G., Dec. 1962, 
p. 1387) (New application received, see 
above). 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During November, the Minister of Labour 
appointed conciliation officers to deal with 
the following disputes: 

1. Hull City Transport Limited and Hull 
Metropolitan Transport Limited, Hull, Que., 
and Division 591 of the Amalgamated 
Association of Street, Electric Railway and 
Motor Coach Employees of America (Con- 
ciliation Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

2. Northern Wings Limited, Sept-Iles, 
Que., and Lodge 767 of the International 
Association of Machinists (Conciliation 
Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

3. Alberta Wheat Pool, Burrard Ter- 
minals Limited, Pacific Elevators Limited, 
Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and United Grain 
Growers Limited, and Grain Workers' 
Union, Local 333 of the International 
Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, 
Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of Amer- 
ica (Conciliation Officer: G. R. Currie). 

4. Canadian Transit Company, Windsor, 
Qnt., and Local 880 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 
(Conciliation Officer: F. J. Ainsborough). 

5. Canadian National Hotels, Limited 
(Charlottetown Hotel, Charlottetown) and 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Trans- 
port and General Workers (Conciliation 
Officer: H. R. Pettigrove). 

6. Canadian National Hotels, Limited 
(Bessborough Hotel, Saskatoon) and Cana- 
dian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport 
and General Workers (Conciliation Officer: 
J. S. Gunn). 

Settlements Reported by Conciliation Officers 

1. Hill The Mover (Canada) Limited, 
Ottawa and Toronto Terminals, and Local 
419 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (Conciliation Officer: 
F. J. Ainsborough) (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 
1392). 



2. Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited, 
Vancouver, and Local 28 of the Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' In- 
ternational Union (Conciliation Officer: 
G. R. Currie) (L.G., Sept. 1962, p. 1034). 

3. Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
S.S. Princess Helene and Seafarers' Inter- 
national Union of Canada (Conciliation 
Officer: H. R. Pettigrove) (L.G., Aug. 1962, 
p. 951). 

Conciliation Boards Appointed 

1. Canadian National Hotels Limited 
(Chateau Laurier Hotel, Ottawa) and 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Trans- 
port and General Workers (L.G., Dec. 
1962, p. 1392). 

2. Hull City Transport Limited and Hull 
Metropolitan Transport Limited, Hull, Que., 
and Division 591 of the Amalgamated 
Association of Street, Electric Railway and 
Motor Coach Employees of America (see 
above). 

Conciliation Board Report Received 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau (Hanson Transport Company Lim- 
ited, Inter-City Truck Lines Limited, The 
Walter Little Limited, The Overland Express 
Limited, Smith Transport Limited and 
Motorways Limited) (Northern General 
Agreement) and Local 938 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of Amer- 
ica (L.G., Oct. 1962, p. 1149). The text 
of the report is reproduced below. 

Settlement Reached following Board Procedure 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau (Hanson Transport Company Lim- 
ited, Inter-City Truck Lines Limited, The 
Walter Little Limited, The Overland Ex- 
press Limited, Smith Transport Limited 
and Motorways Limited) (Northern Gen- 
eral Agreement) and Local 938 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America (see above). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



49 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau, Toronto 

and 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters 



This Board held its first meeting at the 
King Edward Hotel, Toronto, Ont, on 
Saturday, the 13th of October, 1962, at 
which time both parties filed written briefs 
and made oral submissions, from which it 
became clear that while the parties had 
agreed that the wage increases recently 
granted in the general freight and main- 
tenance agreements between the parties in 
what was colloquially called the "Southern 
Agreements" between the parties should 
apply to the "Northern Agreements," there 
were still five outstanding matters in dispute 
between these parties which must be re- 
solved before the Northern Agreements 
between the parties could be consummated. 

The points at issue between the parties 
were as follows: 

1. Maintenance of existing wage differen- 
tials. 

2. Hours of work and overtime. 

3. Maintenance of present highway mile- 
age limitations. 

4. Maintenance of present "share-the- 
wealth" provisions. 

5. Duration of proposed collective agree- 
ment. 

The Board conferred with the parties, 
both jointly and severally, throughout Satur- 
day, October 13, without being able to 
achieve agreement between the parties on 
any of the points in dispute, and both 
parties suggested at various times during 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between the Motor Trans- 
port Industrial Relations Bureau, Toronto, 
and Local 938 of the International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehouse- 
men and Helpers of America. The Bureau 
represented the following companies: Han- 
son Transport Company Limited, Inter-City 
Truck Lines Limited, The Walter Little 
Limited, The Overland Express Limited, 
Smith Transport Limited and Motorways 
Limited (Northern General Agreement). 

The Board was under the chairmanship of 
His Honour Judge R. W. Reville of Brant- 
ford, Ont. He was appointed by the Minister 
on the joint recommendation of the other 
two members, Michael O'Brien and Paul 
Siren, both of Toronto, nominees of the 
Bureau and union, respectively. 

All matters in dispute between the parties 
were resolved with the assistance of the 
Board and terms of settlement were signed 
to this effect. 

The report is reproduced below. 



50 



the day that unless the parties retreated 
from their past positions on one or more 
of the disputed points, this Board might 
as well adjourn and write its report. 

However, the members of the Board 
unanimously felt that the parties respective 
positions were not as rigid as they super- 
ficially appeared, and suggested to the par- 
ties that the proceedings be adjourned for 
one week and that in the meantime the 
parties review their respective positions, 
confer with each other, and attempt to 
resolve their respective differences if at all 
possible, and the parties agreed to this 
proposed procedure. 

The Board met again with the parties 
on Saturday, October 20, and it rapidly 
became apparent that the cooling-off period 
suggested by the Board had a beneficial 
effect, because the rigidity exhibited by the 
parties during the first sittings of the Board 
was now considerably modified, and that 
the climate for achieving a mutually satis- 
factory settlement between the parties was 
much more favourable. The Board then 
continued its efforts to assist the parties to 
achieve concensus ad idem throughout the 
day and the evening of Saturday, October 
20, and finally the parties, with the assist- 
ance of the Board and with the exercise 
of much goodwill and mutual understand- 
ing, were able to achieve complete settle- 
ment of all the matters in dispute between 
them. 

The parties then, under the auspices of 
the Board, drew up complete minutes of 
settlement of all their outstanding differ- 
ences, which minutes of settlement were 
then executed by the signing authorities for 
both parties, and by the members of this 
Board, which may be summarized as 
follows: 

Both the Northern General Freight Agree- 
ment and the Northern Maintenance Freight 
Agreement, both dated the 11th day of 
May, 1959, are renewed subject to the 
following amendments: 

1. All matters agreed to between the 
parties prior to the sittings of the Con- 
ciliation Board on the 13th and 20th days 
of October, 1962, shall be embodied in the 
new collective agreements between the 
parties. 

2. The new collective agreements be- 
tween the parties shall take effect from 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



\ 



the 4th day of November, 1962, and shall 
expire as follows: 

(a) The Northern General Freight Agree- 
ment on the 15th of November, 1965; 

(b) The Northern Maintenance Freight 
Agreement on the 15th of July, 1965. 

3. Wage increases contained in the Gen- 
eral Freight (Southern) Agreement shall 
apply to the new Northern General Freight 
and Northern Maintenance Freight Agree- 
ments, and be phrased in the same manner 
and intervals. 

4. In addition to item 3 above, wage 
rates in Group (b) shall be increased by 
six cents (.060 per hour, to be applied as 
follows: 

(a) General Freight Agreement, January 
1st, 1965, two cents (.020 P er hour; 
October 1st, 1965, four cents (.040 
per hour. 

(b) General Maintenance Freight Agree- 
ment, January 1st, 1965, two cents 
(.020 per hour; June 1st, 1965, four 
cents (.040 per hour. 

and wage rates in Group (c) shall be 
increased by eight cents (.080 P er hour, 
to be applied as follows: 

(a) General Freight Agreement, January 
1st, 1965, two cents (.020 per hour; 
October 1st, 1965, six cents (.060 per 
hour; 

(b) General Maintenance Freight Agree- 
ment, January 1st, 1965, two cents 
(.020 per hour; June 1st, 1965, six 
cents (.060 per hour. 

5. The overtime conditions listed in the 
General Freight (Southern) Agreement, and 
the General Maintenance Freight (South- 
ern) Agreement, shall be applied to the 
Northern Agreements as of January 1, 1963, 
except that such conditions shall not apply 
to regularly scheduled pick-up and delivery 
runs that extend beyond the urban limits 
of municipalities covered by the said agree- 
ments. 



6. The present "share-the-wealth" provi- 
sions shall not apply to those communities 
on Highway No. 17 and north of said 
Highway No. 17. 

7. Speed limits shall be in accordance 
with those posted, except that the maximum 
speed shall be 55 miles an hour. 

8. The present mileage limitations con- 
tained in the expired agreements shall 
remain at 4,400 miles per two weeks' period, 
except that drivers may book off after 2,200 
miles in one week at their home terminals 
providing there are qualified highway driv- 
ers available in either the highway or city 
departments. 

9. Retroactivity: All employees who have 
worked every week in the period January 
1, 1962 to November 4, 1962, inclusive, 
shall be paid eighty dollars ($80.00) as 
retroactive pay. Any employee who has not 
worked every week in the above mentioned 
period shall be paid retroactive pay on 
the basis of two dollars ($2.00) per week 
for each week in which he has worked 
more than fifteen (15) hours. 

This Board wishes to commend the par- 
ties and their representatives for the con- 
ciliatory and co-operative attitude which 
they displayed throughout the course by 
the Board's hearings, and for the obvious 
goodwill that was exhibited by each to the 
other in arriving at a sensible and far- 
sighted agreement. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) R. W. Reville, 
Chairman. 

(Sgd.) M. O'Brien, 
Member. 

(Sgd.) Paul Siren, 
Member. 

Dated at the City of Brantford, Ontario, 
this 27th day of October, A.D. 1962. 



Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 
Releases Decisions in Four Recent Cases 



The Canadian Railway Board of Adjust- 
ment No. 1 last month released its deci- 
sions in four cases, three of which had 
required a second hearing in the presence 
of a referee. These second hearings were 
held January 12, February 13 and Novem- 
ber 13, 1962. The fourth case was heard 
on November 13 also. 

The first dispute was over the dismissal 
of three head-end crew members of a train 



that passed through a red signal. The em- 
ployees said the dismissals were "wrongful" 
and claimed reinstatement. 

The second dispute concerned the protest 
by yard engineers and firemen over the 
institution of the five-day week at Saint 
John and McAdam, N.B., an act that they 
said resulted in a loss of wages. 

The third dispute was over the inter- 
pretation of seniority rules in a large ter- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



51 



minal, and the fourth over the abolition of 
a supervisory agent's position and the sub- 
stitution for it of two others, one of which 
the employees protested was filled without 
relation to the collective agreement. 

In the first case the referee held that 
the employees should be reinstated but 
without payment for the 22 months they 
were held out of service. 

In the second case the referee upheld 
the company's contention. 

In the third case, the Board did not 
sustain two of the employees' three requests 
but sustained the third. 

In the fourth case, the referee held that 
the company, in effecting reorganization 
and regrouping of positions under new 
job titles, must do so within the frame of 
reference provided by the collective agree- 
ment. 

Summaries of the four cases, Nos. 796 
to 799, are published below. 

Case No. 796 — Dispute between Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (Pacific Region) 
and Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, and 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and 
Enginemen, ex parte, over the dismissal of 
an engineer, a trainman and a fireman who 
were the head-end crew of a train that 
passed through a red block signal. 

An engineer, a trainman and a fireman 
who were the head-end crew of a train that 
on January 20, 1961 passed a "reduce 
speed" signal without slowing and a later 
"stop and proceed" signal without stopping 
were dismissed for having violated the 
Uniform Code of Operating Rules. The 
brake had been applied, but too late. 

The three Brotherhoods claimed wrong- 
ful dismissal and requested reinstatement 
of the three men, with full pay for time 
lost. The company contested the claim. The 
Brotherhoods also objected to the manner 
in which the company investigation leading 
to the dismissals was conducted. 

Two company officials who were conduct- 
ing an efficiency or educational test had 
caused the first signal to be continually at 
yellow and the second to be continually at 
red. 

There was conflicting evidence from the 
three crew members on the one hand, and 
the two company officials on the other. The 
dispute came twice before the Board of 
Adjustment. The first time, the Board was 
unable to reach a majority decision and 
moved for the appointment of a referee; 
the second time (January 12, 1962), the 
case was reheard by the Board in the 
presence of the referee, whose award con- 
stitutes the decision of the Board. 



In their contention, the employees sub- 
mitted that they had "called" all signals 
since the beginning of their trip. All had 
been audibly acknowledged to indicate 
"proceed." The signals included Signal 750, 
which the company officials asserted was 
showing yellow, and Signal 736, which they 
said was showing red. 

After Signal 736 had been called as "clear 
block" by the fireman and observed and 
acknowledged by the rest of the crew, the 
fireman called attention to the signal, which, 
the employees stated, was rapidly changing 
from green to red and back several times, 
finally remaining red. As soon as he saw 
the signal flickering, the engineer applied 
the automatic brake, not placing it in 
"emergency" for fear of skidding the engine 
and causing damage to it. 

The train stopped approximately 450 feet 
past the signal, then proceeded. The two 
officials went to the next station and stopped 
the train and questioned both head-end and 
rear-end crews. Not being satisfied with 
the answers, they ordered the three em- 
ployees not to continue working and to 
be available the next day for an inquiry. 

The investigation the next day was con- 
ducted by one of the two company officials. 
He mentioned interviews he had had with 
sectionmen working on the track at the time 
of the incident. Ten days later the three 
employees were called into the Superin- 
tendent's office "in connection with the 
false statement" given at the inquiry. A 
week later the three men were dismissed. 

The three Brotherhoods contended that 
the entire investigation had not been con- 
ducted in the manner provided in their 
collective agreements. 

At this second hearing, in the presence 
of the referee, the parties were permitted 
to supplement their original presentations. 
The company exhibited a piece of rail and 
a standard track circuit "shunt" or "jumper" 
used in making its efficiency or educational 
test; it also showed a film and still pictures 
of observations made by two company 
officials during the test. 

In its further submission at this second 
hearing, the company raised the objection 
that the employees' appeals from dismissal 
would, according to the collective agree- 
ments, be too late. The referee thought, 
however, that the appeals should be enter- 
tained. 

The company suggested in its submission 
that the employees may have confused 
Signal 736 — the "stop and proceed" signal — 
with Signal 730, about i mile farther on. 
The employees denied this. 

The employees had contended that the 
shunt may have been put out of order by 



52 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



a heavy coating of frost. This submission 
was contradicted by a report from the 
Chief Forecaster at Edmonton airport. 

The employees contended also that the 
telephone and telegraph wires between the 
track and the highway may have obstructed 
the sight of the two company officials. This 
was disproved, the referee said, by the film 
that was introduced by the company as 
evidence. Claims of possible malfunctioning 
of the shunt or test device were disproved 
through a careful examination and testing 
of the shunt after its use. 

As for the signals themselves, they had 
been checked by a maintenance man shortly 
after the test, and had been found to be 
in good order. 

Referee's Decision 

The referee, stating there was contradic- 
tory evidence from the three employees on 
one side and two company officers on the 
other, said that a determining fact to be 
considered was the evidence given by the 
foreman of the section crew, to which 
reference was made at the first inquiry. 

The foreman had seen both an inter- 
mediate signal and Signal 736 steadily 
burning red at the time, and without a 
flicker. This evidence contradicted that of 
the employees, and was corroborated by 
another member of the section crew. 

The referee concluded that the employees 
had violated the Uniform Code of Operat- 
ing Rules, but did not think that a definite 
dismissal was an appropriate penalty. 

The referee held that the three employees 
should be reinstated by the company as 
from December 20, 1962, without payment 
for time lost. 

, Case No. 797 — Dispute between Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic Region) 
and Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers 
and Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen 
and Enginemen, ex parte, over company's 
assigning of regularly assigned engine crews 
in yard service on a five-day week basis at 
Saint John and McAdam, N.B. 

At the spring change of time-table in 
1961, the Canadian Pacific Railway Com- 
pany decided that at Saint John and Mc- 
Adam, N.B., yard assignments would be on 
a- five-day week basis. 

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi- 
neers and the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and Enginemen protested that the 
Company's action in "arbitrarily" restricting 
engineers and firemen at the two places to 
five days work a week was in contravention 
of the collective agreements. They con- 
tended further that certain engineers and 
firemen suffered a loss in wages and should 
be compensated for their loss. 



The Company argued that it acted 
"strictly within the provisions" of the agree- 
ments. 

An article in the collective agreements 
with the Engineers and the Locomotive 
Firemen and Enginemen provides that: "A 
work week consisting of five consecutive 
days of eight hours each is established . . ." 
A subsection provides that: "All regular 
or relief assignments for yard service engi- 
neers shall be for five consecutive days 
per work week of not less than eight 
consecutive hours per day, except as other- 
wise provided in this article." The excep- 
tions are outlined in later subsections, which 
provided for the filling of days off by the 
regularly assigned engineer "by arrangement 
between the representatives of the Railway 
and the Organization." 

The Company's position was that it was 
not under any obligation to make arrange- 
ments with the unions concerning the estab- 
lishment of the five-day work week at Saint 
John and McAdam. "The Company's right 
to establish five-day assignments is unre- 
stricted," it contended. 

When the dispute came before the Board 
of Adjustment in September 1961, a major- 
ity decision was unattainable. A referee was 
appointed by the Minister of Labour and 
the dispute was reheard on February 13, 
1962 in the referee's presence. His award 
constitutes the decision of the Board. 

The referee said in his award that "to 
dispose of the dispute, he had in effect to 
interpret the article cited by both parties. 
"I have to determine whether or not the 
Company has the right to apply without 
restriction the five-day work week for 
engineers and firemen in yard service." 

He pointed out that in the collective 
agreement between the Company and the 
Engineers signed on November 20, 1953, 
the Engineers in yard service obtained a 
20-per-cent pay increase to cover the estab- 
lishment of the five-day week. The article 
cited was first introduced in that agreement 
"substantially in their present form." 

Early in 1954 discussions were held 
concerning the implementation of the five- 
day week and on March 15 understandings 
were reached with both Brotherhoods. A 
letter expounding the understandings stated: 
"[the article cited] provides that the Com- 
pany has unrestricted right to the establish- 
ment of five-day assignments in accordance 
with the railway's operational requirements." 

Another article on which the employees 
placed great emphasis, the referee said, does 
not more than establish formally the under- 
standing reached that firemen "will have 
the right to work in their turn up to 3,800 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



53 



miles per month in freight service, or six 
days per week in yard service." 

As for the employees' contention that if 
the Company is allowed to proceed with 
its action there will be a loss of salary 
and a reduction in pension upon retirement 
for engineers and firemen in yard service, 
which submission was doubtful in the Com- 
pany's opinion, the referee said the real 
issue is "not whether the employees of any 
class will suffer as the result of a proper 
interpretation and application" of the collec- 
tive agreement. He added that perhaps it 
was fitting to keep in mind that the em- 
ployees concerned enjoyed a 20-per-cent 
wage increase when the agreement of 
November 20, 1953 came into effect. 

"According to a sound interpretation, it 
is the work week itself which should be 
established in accordance with the railway's 
operational requirements, bearing always in 
mind that the work week consists of five 
consecutive days . . . 

"It is therefore impossible to agree with 
the employees when they contend that the 
Company had no right to act as it did at 
Saint John, N.B., and McAdam, N.B., even 
if there was no change in the amount of 
work handled at the terminals concerned 
or, in other terms, no change in the rail- 
way's operational requirements." 

The referee said he saw it as his duty 
to "maintain the Company's contention and 
dismiss the employees'." 

Case No. 798 — Dispute between Canadian 
National Railways (Great Lakes Region) 
and Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
over interpretation of seniority rules govern- 
ing yardmasters and assistant yardmasters. 

Occurrences after the advertising by the 
Canadian National Railways of the posi- 
tion of yardmaster, Bathurst Street Tower, 
Toronto terminals, led to the making of 
three requests by the Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen. The company declined all 
three requests 

When the assignment was advertised, a 
relief yardmaster in Zone 3 of the Toronto 
terminals, W. F. Seager, did not apply (the 
vacancy was in Zone 2). Nor did a number 
of other relief yardmasters not in Zone 2. 

For the next month Mr. Seager pro- 
tected temporary vacancies in Zone 3. For 
the month after that, he was on vacation 
and leave of absence. When he returned, 
in accordance with an item in the crew 
director's log, he declared his intention to 
displace the employee who had been pro- 
moted to yardmaster at Bathurst street, 
J. A. Chepelsky. Then he made application 
for a temporary vacancy in Zone 3 and 
remained on that vacancy for the next ten 



days, after which he reported for work at 
Bathurst street but did not begin work after 
an oral examination by the road foreman 
and general yardmaster established that he 
did not possess the necessary qualifications 
for the position. 

Contending that Mr. Seager had volun- 
tarily relinquished his rights as yardmaster, 
the Brotherhood requested removal of his 
name from the Toronto Terminals seniority 
list for yardmasters and assistant yard- 
masters. An article in the current agree- 
ment covering yardmasters says: "An un- 
assigned yardmaster who declines to accept 
a regular assignment in accordance with 
his seniority . . . shall forfeit his seniority 
rights and his name shall be removed from 
the seniority list." The company declined 
the request. 

After discussions between company and 
union officials, on December 28, 1961 a 
memorandum of agreement was signed re- 
garding the application of an article of 
the agreement affecting seniority for yard- 
masters and assistant yardmasters, and it 
was agreed that the position in dispute 
should be re-advertised. 

When the position was re-advertised, 
Messrs. Seager and Chepelsky, among 
others, applied. As a result of an examina- 
tion, Mr. Chepelsky was awarded the posi- 
tion, and the others were told that they 
had not qualified. 

Unassigned yardmasters and assistant 
yardmasters who did not apply for the 
position when it was re-advertised were 
ranked junior to Mr. Chepelsky but those 
who applied and failed to qualify were not. 
The Brotherhood then made its second 
request: that all unassigned yardmasters 
"who failed to accept promotion to the 
regular assignment to which Chepelsky was 
assigned" should rank junior to Chepelsky. 
The union cited the memorandum of under- 
standing signed on December 28, which 
read in part as follows: 

"An unassigned yardmaster who declines 
to accept a regular assignment in accord- 
ance with his seniority under this schedule, 
shall thereafter rank junior to the man 
promoted to a regular assignment in his 
stead." 

The railway declined, contending that as 
all who applied, except Chepelsky, had 
been found not qualified for the position, 
"they had no opportunity to decline the 
assignment." 

At about the same time, Brotherhood 
representatives were told of the company's 
intention to require applicants for per- 
manent positions as yardmasters or assistant 
yardmasters to pass a written and oral 
examination conducted by company officers. 



54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



If qualifications of applicants were equal, 
the senior man would be assigned; but if 
the examination showed that one candidate 
was better qualified, he would be assigned, 
regardless of seniority. The Brotherhood 
representatives agreed that an unqualified 
applicant should not be assigned to any 
position but believed that qualified appli- 
cants should be assigned on a seniority 
basis even when the examiner thought a 
junior applicant better qualified. 

The difference of opinion on this point 
led to the Brotherhood's third request: that 
the article in the current agreement headed 
"Bulletining and Filling Positions" be inter- 
preted to mean, "qualifications being suffi- 
cient, the senior applicant must be assigned." 

Regarding the union's first request, the 
company in its contention stated that in 
1958 a representative of the company and 
the union's general chairman had discussed 
the practicability of requiring unassigned 
yardmasters to apply for bulletined posi- 
tioned positions in yards in which they had 
no experience. The company official had 
pointed out that unassigned yardmasters 
would have little chance to familiarize 
themselves with work in other zones, which 
might be quite different from that in their 
own zone. He suggested that it would not 
be practicable to require such men to apply 
for bulletined regular assignments in zones 
other than their own. The union chairman, 
the company stated, had said that he would 
have no objection; and that the practice had 
then been established in the Toronto ter- 
minals, without, however, being authorized 
by any proper revision of the existing 
memorandum of understanding. 

Under the circumstances, the company 
contended, Mr. Seager had "fully protected 
[his seniority] in accordance with appli- 
cable rules, agreed understandings and prac- 
tices in effect at that time." 

The company's answer to the union's 
second request has already been stated. 
Regarding the third request, the company, 
quoting the relevant article of the agree- 
ment, contended that certain excerpts showed 
that in negotiating the rule regarding the 
bulletining and filling of yardmasters' posi- 
tions "both parties recognized that the 
supervisory nature of the position, the 
complexity of the work and the fact that 
methods of operation in individual yards 
in a large terminal are entirely dissimilar 
demand that in selecting an applicant merit 
and ability must be given first considera- 
tion." 

The company further contended that "any 
concession of the nature requested by the 
employees would certainly result in forcing 



unassigned yardmasters and assistant yard- 
masters to take important assignments which 
they are not properly qualified to fill and 
do not desire, or to forfeit valuable 
seniority." This, the company argued, would 
not be in the interests of either of the 
parties. 

The Board did not sustain the employees' 
first and second requests but it sustained 
the third. 

Case No. 799 — Dispute between Canadian 
National Railways (Atlantic Region) and 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, ex parte, 
over the abolition of the supervisory agent's 
position at Yarmouth, N.S., and the sub- 
stitution of two positions, one of which 
was not bulletined to telegraphers. 

In 1955, the Canadian National Railways 
signed a memorandum of agreement with 
the Order of Railroad Telegraphers by 
which a position of supervisory agent was 
to be established at Yarmouth effective 
in December of that year. 

In 1960, on the retirement of the incum- 
bent of this position, the company told the 
union of its intention to reclassify the posi- 
tion as agent-operator, and to assign its 
supervisory duties to a new position of 
port agent, which the company proposed 
to establish. The port agent's position was 
not to come under the collective agreement 
with the Telegraphers. The union refused to 
agree to the company's proposal, and the 
company unilaterally put its plan into 
effect. The port agent's position was filled 
without relation to the collective agreement. 

The union carried its claim to the Board, 
and when the Board was unable to reach a 
majority decision, it asked the Minister 
of Labour to appoint a referee, whose deci- 
sion would become that of the Board. 

The referee in his report said that there 
were three points on which the union could 
have contested the company's action. First, 
it could have disputed the company's right 
to abolish the position of supervisory agent; 
second, it could have disputed the com- 
pany's right to divide the duties of that 
position between a position already recog- 
nized by the collective agreement and a 
new position; third, it could have disputed 
the company's right to establish the new 
position outside the collective agreement 
and outside the reach of the union. 

In fact, the referee said, the union 
had chosen to confine its claim to a con- 
tention that the company had violated the 
collective agreement in failing to bulletin 
the new job. Therefore, he said, he was 
required to decide only this one point, and 
other matters mentioned by the union in 
its submission need not concern him. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



55 



The referee referred to the supplemen- 
tary agreement signed by the company and 
the union in 1955, "by which they declared 
that effective December 16, 1955 the posi- 
tion of agent at Yarmouth 'will be desig- 
nated as a supervisory agent, and be 
governed by rules and working conditions 
applicable to supervisory agents, in accord- 
ance with agreement effective December 1, 
1947; and supplements thereto . . .'" (The 
emphasis was the referee's.) 

The position of supervisory agent, he 
pointed out, was not expressly covered by 
the scope article of the agreement, either 
as it stood when the agreement was first 
made in 1947, or now. He held, however, 
that the classification had been brought 
into the agreement "by various supplements 
now incorporated therein." He remarked 
that the parties "are old hands at piece- 
meal adjustments in their relationships to 
accommodate new situations . . . 

"The basic question in this dispute is 
whether the company is entitled, without 
the concurrence of ORT, to remove the 
job or any part of it from the grasp of 
the collective agreement," the referee said. 
Change of title was not in itself an issue. 
But "nowhere in the collective agreement 
is there any explicit provision for removal 
from its scope of any job that is or has 
been brought within it." 

The company had made use of three 
arguments to support its right to establish 
the position of port agent outside the collec- 
tive agreement, the referee noted. First, 
it urged that the marine operations in- 
volved in the non-schedule position did not 
constitute an integral part of its railway 
system (they related to supervision of the 
control of ferry terminals) and that the 
port agent did not perform work "generally 
recognized as that of a telegrapher." 

The company asserted, as its second 
argument, that the ORT had recognized 
this in regard to a similar situation at Port 
aux Basques, Newfoundland, "where rail- 
way work and marine terminal work which 
for many years had been combined in the 
functions of a supervisory agent, were 
separated, and the ORT agreed to the 
establishment of a port agent, as an excluded 
classification, to handle the supervisory 
marine terminal work." 

Thirdly, the company produced a letter 
of August 1960 in which the ORT had said 
that it "would be prepared to make this 
an appointive position with the only pro- 



viso . . . that it would have to be filled 
from the ranks of telegraphers." 

Dealing with these arguments in reverse 
order, the referee pointed out that the 
ORT's letter had been written when the 
company's action on the reorganization at 
Yarmouth had already been taken and 
had been disputed by the union. "I do 
not see how this letter can work an 
estoppel against ORT when it was not 
acted on by the company, and when the 
situation now before me had already crys- 
tallized at the time the letter was written," 
he said. 

"The Port aux Basques precedent would 
have had more persuasive effect if the 
company's action there had been carried 
through unilaterally. But it was not; the 
parties came to an agreement . . .," the 
referee said. 

Coming to the company's first and main 
argument, he continued, "The scope rule 
[of the agreement] would be an understand- 
able resort by the company if ORT were 
seeking in this case to insist that previously 
uncontrolled ferry terminal supervision 
work should be brought under the collective 
agreement. But the situation here is the 
reverse one of the company seeking to 
exclude, not some minor element or a few 
job elements, but all the duties of ferry 
terminal supervision which had been brought 
under collective agreement control by the 
special agreement of December 15, 1955. 
That agreement was not one for any fixed 
time which had expired; it was not geared 
to the working life of [the original holder]; 
and it was not qualified in its application 
by any distinction in the kinds of duties 
that belong to the collective agreement 
and those that are outside it." 

Again the referee said, "Supervisory 
duties are involved in the port agent job, 
and if they were embraced in the job of 
supervisory agent as established on Decem- 
ber 15, 1955, the company cannot justify 
their wholesale subtraction by creating a 
new job title . . . 

"The conclusion is, in my view, inescap- 
able that, granting the company's right to 
effect reorganization of functions and re- 
group them under new job titles, it can 
do so only within the frame of reference 
provided by the collective agreement. It 
follows that the job of Yarmouth port agent 
should have been bulletined . . . and there 
will be a direction that this be done forth- 
with." 



56 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



B.C. Court of Appeal rules on jurisdiction of provincial Superior Court over 
Canada Labour Relations Board. Ontario Court of Appeal holds that award of 
arbitration board under collective agreement is reviewable by courts; High 
Court rules Ontario Food Terminal Board is subject to Labour Relations Act 



In British Columbia, the Court of Appeal 
held that the Canada Labour Relations 
Board exercises its jurisdiction throughout 
Canada and, although it sits in Ontario, 
its jurisdiction transcends provincial boun- 
daries and operates without regard to them. 
Therefore, the Board may be subject to 
the jurisdiction of a provincial Superior 
Court in any province when the decision 
of the Board deals with matters arising in 
that particular province or affects parties 
domiciled in that province, or if the con- 
tracts of employment to be performed are 
within that province. 

In Ontario, the Court of Appeal stressed 
the distinction between consensual and 
statutory arbitrators and held that an arbi- 
tration board constituted under a collective 
agreement and subject to the Ontario Labour 
Relations Act is a statutory board. Accord- 
ingly, the Court has jurisdiction to review 
its decisions and to remit them for recon- 
sideration on certiorari. 

In Ontario, the High Court, in upholding 
a certification order, ruled that the Ontario 
Food Terminal Board is not a Crown 
Agency and therefore is subject to the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act. 

British Columbia Court of Appeal. . . 

. . .rules B.C. Supreme Court has jurisdiction to 
hear application to quash federal board decision 

On September 25, 1962, the British 
Columbia Court of Appeal allowed an 
appeal from the judgment of Mr. Justice 
Brown of the British Columbia Supreme 
Court (L.G., July 1962, p. 862) and ruled 
that the British Columbia Supreme Court 
has jurisdiction to hear a certiorari applica- 
tion to quash certification decisions affecting 
an employer and certain unions domiciled in 



British Columbia rendered by the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, sitting in the prov- 
ince of Ontario. 

Three unions located and carrying on 
their business in British Columbia applied 
to the Canada Labour Relations Board at 
Ottawa under the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act for certification 
as the bargaining agents for three units 
of employees of Vantel Broadcasting Co. 
Ltd., which company carries on a broad- 
casting business at Burnaby, B.C. In due 
course, the Board certified the unions con- 
cerned as the respective bargaining agents 
for the company's employees. 

The broadcasting company then applied 
to the Supreme Court of British Columbia 
for a writ of certiorari to bring up and 
quash the three certificates. The writ was 
refused on a preliminary objection taken 
by counsel for the Board that the Supreme 
Court of British Columbia had no authority 
over a federal Board located in the province 
of Ontario or its proceedings. The broad- 
casting company appealed the judgment. 

Counsel for the Board argued that the 
Supreme Court of British Columbia, under 
Section 9 of the Supreme Court Act, has 
jurisdiction only in cases arising within the 
province, and that the court's process can- 
not be served, except where permitted by 
the Rules of Court, or be enforced beyond 
the territorial limits of the province; that 
the provincial Legislature has no authority 
under the B.N.A. Act to extend the juris- 
diction of the court beyond the boundaries 
of the province; consequently, the Board 
which is located in Ottawa for all the 
purposes connected with the application and 
its proceedings, is beyond the reach of the 
Supreme Court of British Columbia and its 
processes, and there is no way in which 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



57 



the Board can be compelled to return its 
record consisting of the applications and 
certificates, or by which the Court can quash 
the Board's orders for certification. 

The British Columbia Court of Appeal 
did not accept these arguments and held 
the British Columbia Supreme Court to be 
competent to consider the application for 
certiorari to quash the certification orders 
issued by the Canada Labour Relations 
Board. The main reasons for the judgment 
were as follows: 

Under the B.N.A. Act, the Legislature of 
a province cannot, in matters otherwise 
falling within its authority, extend the 
power of the provincial courts beyond the 
territorial limits of the province, although 
it may permit some processes to be served 
ex juris. But, the jurisdiction of the Supreme 
Court of British Columbia is not confined 
to matters falling within the competence 
of the provincial legislature. As a superior 
court of general jurisdiction it is charged 
by the B.N.A. Act (subject to statutory 
exceptions) with the administration of all 
the laws of the land, including laws made 
by Parliament and by the Legislature. In 
administering law falling within the legisla- 
tive competence of the Parliament of Can- 
ada, the provincial courts may be freed 
to some degree by the B.N.A. Act or the 
terms of dominion legislation from the 
territorial limitations otherwise imposed 
upon the exercise of their jurisdiction. Fur- 
ther, by implication, the B.N.A. Act has, in 
some degree, enlarged territorially the power 
of provincial courts to supervise and control 
federal boards by means of the prerogative 
writs. 

For the purpose of enforcing ordinary 
civil rights that fall within provincial legis- 
lative authority under Section 92 of the 
B.N.A. Act, and of determining the juris- 
diction of the provincial courts over non- 
residents in respect of those matters, the 
rules of private international law apply, 
and, in that respect, there is no difference 
between the relation of the province of 
British Columbia to another province of 
Canada, and the relation of British Colum- 
bia to a foreign state; each is in those 
matters, vis-a-vis the other, a foreign and 
a sovereign state in which the choice of 
the applicable law and the jurisdiction of 
the respective courts are settled by the 
principles of private international law. 

But, those principles of private interna- 
tional law have no bearing upon an appli- 
cation to a provincial court for a preroga- 
tive writ against a board set up by the 
Parliament of Canada to act throughout 
Canada. The rules of private international 



law are used to solve difficulties concerning 
the conflict of laws and the competing 
jurisdiction of courts of sovereign states; 
they have little bearing upon the special 
problem arising in Canada under our par- 
ticular scheme of confederation concerning 
which court may exercise supervision and 
control by a prerogative writ over a feder- 
ally constituted Board. The solution of 
this problem lies in the proper application 
of the provisions of the B.N.A. Act and 
the relevant statutes. 

The scheme of the B.N.A. Act is to leave 
the supervisory jurisdiction of provincial 
superior courts over federal boards in the 
courts of the province in which the matter 
arises and where the board's order operates. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board, 
established under the Act of Parliament of 
Canada, exercises its jurisdiction throughout 
the whole Dominion. Although it may sit 
in Ottawa, it pays no attention, in matters 
such as the one under review, to provincial 
boundary lines, and operates without regard 
to them. It is not a foreign or a truly extra- 
provincial body. That being so, it is quite 
wrong to localize the Board in the province 
of Ontario, simply because its head office 
happens to be there, for the purpose of 
determining which provincial court has juris- 
diction over it. For this purpose, the Board 
must be taken to be in the province in 
which it is exercising some aspect of its 
jurisdiction, or where its orders operate, and 
to be subject to the courts of that province. 

The jurisdiction to grant the writ of 
certiorari in the case at bar must be in 
one or more of the provincial superior 
courts, for the Exchequer Court of Canada, 
established by Parliament under the author- 
ity of Section 101 of the B.N.A. Act, is 
a statutory court which has only the powers 
with which Parliament has endowed it, and 
no common law jurisdiction. It does not 
have jurisdiction to issue a writ of certiorari 
in a case under consideration. In the cir- 
cumstances of the case at bar, the only 
provincial courts that might have jurisdic- 
tion are the Supreme Court of British 
Columbia and the High Court of Ontario. 

In the case of the Supreme Court of 
British Columbia, it can have jurisdiction 
under the common law and Section 9 of 
the Supreme Court Act only if the matters 
in respect of which the certiorari is sought 
arise in the province. In the case at bar 
these matters do arise in the province of 
British Columbia; the certificates were 
granted to local unions within the province; 
they affect employees and employers within 
the province, and contracts of employment 
to be performed are entirely within the 
province. Consequently, the case at bar is 



58 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



clearly within the territorial jurisdiction of 
the Supreme Court of British Columbia. 

Regarding the enforcement of the provin- 
cial court's writ and judgment on a federal 
board sitting outside the province, one judge 
of the Court of Appeal expressed the 
opinion that the writ of certiorari and an 
order quashing the certifications in the case 
under review (if such an order should 
be made) would, in the first place, con- 
stitute authority for the Board to make 
the return required by the writ, and to 
make the necessary entries on its own 
records, i.e., by withdrawing its certifications 
so that its records may conform with the 
decision rendered by the court. 

In the second place, there is presently 
no machinery by which a court of British 
Columbia can, against the Board or its 
members, directly enforce obedience or 
punish disobedience to one of its writs or 
orders by civil process operating in another 
province, although, in an appropriate case, 
a charge of disobeying a lawful order of 
the Supreme Court of British Columbia 
might be laid against the members of the 
Board in the courts of Ontario. 

But the lack of any process by which the 
Supreme Court of British Columbia can 
directly enforce obedience or punish dis- 
obedience is not decisive. The federal boards 
are boards answerable to the dominion 
Government or Parliament. It is unthinkable 
that the dominion Government would toler- 
ate one of its boards' disobedience of an 
order of a provincial court. 

But, if it did, there might be little a 
court could do about it, even in its own 
province, because the actual execution of 
its writs, orders and judgments lies, not in 
its hands, but in the hands of sheriffs and 
marshals, the gaolers, and others, who are 
employees of the dominion or provincial 
Governments. If either of these governments 
should instruct the responsible officer not 
to enforce or obey an order of the court, 
the officer would obey the instructions of 
the Government that employs him and pays 
his salary. 

The truth of the matter is that the effec- 
tiveness of judgments and orders of the 
courts against governments and government 
boards depends on the traditional respect 
that the governments pay to the courts, and 
not upon legal sanctions for disobedience. 
The ultimate sanctions for government dis- 
obedience to judgments and orders of the 
courts are not legal, but political. The lack 
of any power to enforce directly a court's 
writ or judgment in cases such as this 
under review, or to punish disobedience, is 
beside the mark. The court must assume 



that governments and government bodies 
will obey, for if they do not, tyranny will 
supplant the rule of law. 

The Court of Appeal, in a unanimous 
decision, allowed the appeal, set aside the 
order dismissing the application for a writ 
of certiorari on the preliminary objection, 
and remitted the application to the court 
below to be disposed of on the merits. 
Vantel Broadcasting Co. Ltd. v. Canada 
Labour Relations Board et al, (1962), 40 
W.W.R., Part 2, p. 95. 

Ontario Court of Appeal. .. 

. . .rules arbitrators under collective agreement 
constitute statutory board, decisions reviewable 

On June 22, 1962, the Ontario Court of 
Appeal remitted an arbitration award under 
a collective agreement to the arbitrators 
for redetermination because the arbitrators 
relied upon evidence extrinsic to the pro- 
visions of the collective agreement and this 
constituted an error in law appearing upon 
the face of the award. The Court held that 
arbitrators acting under a collective agree- 
ment constitute a statutory board and, 
accordingly, the Court has jurisdiction to 
review their award on certiorari. 

On November 26, 1960, a board of 
conciliation constituted pursuant to the pro- 
visions of the Ontario Labour Relations Act 
was successful in achieving a solution of 
the differences between the Civic Em- 
ployees' Union, Local No. 43, and the 
municipality of Metropolitan Toronto, con- 
cerning the terms to be incorporated in a 
new collective bargaining agreement between 
them. On that day, the negotiating com- 
mittees of the parties concerned executed a 
memorandum of agreement upon terms to 
be recommended for inclusion in the col- 
lective agreement. Accordingly, on Decem- 
ber 29, 1960, a formal collective agreement 
was signed between the parties concerned. 

That agreement contained certain retro- 
active features and the extent and applica- 
tion of those retroactive features later 
became the subject of differences between 
the parties. In due course, a board of 
arbitration was constituted. The personnel 
of the board of arbitration as selected were 
the same as the personnel of the board of 
conciliation previously appointed under the 
Act. 

On September 7, 1961, the arbitration 
board issued a majority award dismissing 
the union's grievance. The arbitration board 
arrived at its conclusion by relying upon 
the words of the "agreement to recommend" 
of November 26, 1960, and did not confine 
itself, in determining the grievance, to the 
actual provisions of the collective bargaining 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



59 



agreement of December 29, 1960. The union 
then moved for an order setting aside the 
arbitration award. 

On December 20, 1961, the trial judge 
rendered his decision, in which he stated 
that the collective agreement of December 
29, 1960, which governed the determination 
of grievances between the parties, required 
the payment by the municipality of Toronto 
of the retroactive increases in wages to 
some employees temporarly laid off, and 
ordered such payments; if the municipality 
of Toronto was unwilling to make such pay- 
ments, the union was entitled, upon applica- 
tion to the Court, to an order quashing 
the arbitration award. 

The trial judge concluded that the griev- 
ance should not be considered as an applica- 
tion for interpretation of the agreement 
between the bargaining committees of No- 
vember 26, 1960, but it was a grievance for 
enforcement of the actual collective bar- 
gaining agreement of December 29, 1960, 
as the union viewed the relative provisions 
of that agreement; that the collective bar- 
gaining agreement was free from ambiguity 
and that it was not permissible in its 
interpretation and application to refer to 
or rely upon the previous agreement between 
the negotiating committees. 

Before the Court of Appeal, counsel for 
the municipality of Toronto submitted that, 
because the union in the terms of grievance 
referred to the agreement by the negotiation 
committees, the board was necessarily re- 
ferred to the agreement between the com- 
mittees and, accordingly, what the board did 
was not an error in law warranting inter- 
ference with the award. 

Mr. Justice Aylesworth, who rendered 
the judgment of the Court of Appeal, dis- 
agreed. He was of the opinion that while 
the grievance was somewhat unhappily 
phrased, there was no right or procedure 
provided between the parties for the arbitra- 
tion of grievances except by the terms of 
the collective agreement itself. The method 
by which the personnel of the board was 
determined was that provided in the collec- 
tive agreement. The entire proceeding before 
the board went forward as a grievance 
brought to arbitration pursuant to the right 
to do so provided by the collective agree- 
ment. There was no other suggested basis 
for the arbitration, although the arbitrators 
were at fault in the manner in which they 
attempted to discharge their duties. 

Mr. Justice Aylesworth also disagreed 
with the contention that as the grievance 
had not been filed in compliance with the 
provisions of the collective agreement, the 
submission to arbitration was a nullity and 
the appropriate remedy was by way of 
action for a declaration of nullity. 



Further, the municipality alleged ambi- 
guity in the collective agreement and by 
reason of such alleged ambiguity sought 
to support the action of the board in basing 
its decision upon evidence extrinsic to the 
provisions of the collective agreement. In 
Mr. Justice Aylesworth's opinion, there was 
no ambiguity in the collective agreement 
and, accordingly, no justification for any 
such reference by the arbitrators to the 
agreement of November 26, 1960, or to 
any other such extrinsic evidence. For the 
arbitrators to do so was error in law 
appearing upon the face of their award. 

Finally, with regard to the submission 
that there is no power in the court to remit 
the award of the arbitrators, Mr. Justice 
Aylesworth traced the historical develop- 
ment of the law pertaining to awards of 
arbitrators and to the prerogative remedy of 
certiorari. He pointed out the distinction 
between arbitration as known to the com- 
mon law and a statutory board of arbitra- 
tion compulsorily established. 

At common law, arbitration was the 
voluntary submission by parties to a dispute 
of their differences, not to a court of law, 
but to a tribunal of their own choice. The 
court never issued its prerogative writ of 
certiorari to such arbitrators and the power 
to interfere with their awards was greatly 
limited. At common law, the court had 
no power to remit an award; only if the 
award was made a rule of court could the 
award, on a motion to the court, be set 
aside for misconduct of the arbitrator on 
the ground that it was procured by corrup- 
tion or other undue means. In Simpson v. 
Com'rs of Inland Revenue (1914), 2 K.B. 
842 at p. 846, Mr. Justice Scrutton stated: 

At common law there is no power to remit 
an award to an arbitrator. This difficulty was 
first avoided by agreement between the parties 
that the award should be made a rule of Court. 
Then by the Common Law Procedure Act, 
1854, and afterwards by the Arbitration Act, 
1889, provision was made for this purpose. 

The English Common Law Procedure Act 
of 1854 was followed in 1856 in the prov- 
ince of Ontario by the enactment of a 
provision corresponding to the provision 
regarding remission to arbitration contained 
in Section 8 of the English Act. This pro- 
vision was re-enacted in "An Act to regulate 
the procedure of the Superior Courts of 
common law and of the County Courts" in 
1859 and later appeared in the Common 
Law Procedure Act of Ontario in 1877, 
where in Section 213 it had been stated: 

In case, in any reference to arbitration, 
whether under this Act or otherwise, the sub- 
mission is made a rule of any Court, such 
Court or a Judge thereof may, at any time, and 
from time to time, remit the matters referred, 
or any or either of them, to the reconsideration 



60 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



and re-determination of the Arbitrator or 
Arbitrators or Umpire, as the case may require, 
upon such terms as to costs and otherwise as 
to the said Court or Judge seem proper. 

Later, Section 213 was consolidated to 
reappear as Section 37 of the Arbitration 
Act of 1887, and the Common Law Pro- 
cedure Act (except three sections thereof 
wholly inapplicable to the case at bar) 
was repealed. Provisions corresponding to 
those in that statute concerning arbitration, 
together with the provisions of an Act 
respecting the Costs of Arbitration (1877), 
appeared as a consolidated Act, An Act 
respecting Arbitrations and References, in 
1887. The latter Act was re-enacted in 
1897 and consolidated the same year as the 
Arbitration Act of 1897; the Act in its 
present form, save as to some minor amend- 
ments, first appeared in 1909. By virtue of 
Section 34 (10) of the Labour Relations 
Act, the present Arbitration Act has no 
application to arbitrations under collective 
agreements. The legislative history traced 
above deals with common law arbitration 
only. 

In England, as in the province of Ontario, 
and in contrast to consensual arbitrators, 
many statutory, that is to say compulsory, 
arbitral tribunals have come into being, 
Mr. Justice Aylesworth continued. Before 
the English Common Law Procedure Act 
of 1854, the courts did not differentiate in 
the, remedies to be applied concerning 
awards of the one or the other kind of 
arbitrator and, after the enactment of that 
Act and later after the enactment of the 
Arbitration Act in 1889, the awards of 
either kind of arbitrator were accorded 
equal treatment by those statutes. 

-Some statutory boards, however, were 
not amenable to the provisions of the 
statutes, either by reason of the special 
provisions of the Act creating the particular 
board or because such Act specifically pro- 
vided that the Common Law Procedure Act 
or the Arbitration Act, as the case might 
be, had no application. In such event, the 
Courts still exercised control over such 
boards discharging judicial functions, as 
contrasted with functions purely adminis- 
trative in character, through the old pre- 
rogative writs of prohibition, mandamus 
and certiorari. 

In Russel on Arbitration, 15th ed., (1952), 
p. 162, it is stated: 

Statutory Arbitration. In the case of a 
statutory arbitrator, the normal procedure (i.e., 
the provisions of the English Arbitration Acts) 
may not be applicable, or the statute concerned 
may exclude it. The courts will then have 
recourse to prerogative orders; thus mandamus 
will lie to a statutory arbitrator, and so will 
prohibition. 



In Re International Nickel Co. of Canada 
& Rivando (L.G. 1956, p. 1155), the On- 
tario Court of Appeal held that arbitrators 
acting under a collective bargaining agree- 
ment are a statutory board and that their 
awards, in contrast to those of consensual 
arbitrators, may be brought up on certiorari. 

In R. v. Northumberland Compensation 
Appeal Tribunal, Ex. p. Shaw, (1952), 1 
K.B. 338 at p. 351, Lord Justice Denning 
said: 

... The Court of King's Bench has an 
inherent jurisdiction to control all inferior 
tribunals, not in an appellate capacity, but in 
a supervisory capacity. This control extends not 
only to seeing that the inferior tribunals keep 
within their jurisdiction, but also to seeing that 
they observe the law. The control is exercised 
by means of a power to quash any determina- 
tion by the tribunal which, on the face of it, 
offends against the law. The King's Bench does 
not substitute its own views for those of the 
tribunal, as a Court of Appeal would do. It 
leaves it to the tribunal to hear the case again, 
and in proper case may command it to do 
so. When the King's Bench exercises its con- 
trol over tribunals in this way, it is not usurp- 
ing a jurisdiction which does not belong to it. 
It is only exercising a jurisdiction which it has 
always had. 

Mr. Justice Aylesworth noted that there 
was no one law of certiorari for England 
and a different one for Canada. The law 
of England and the law of Ontario relative 
to certiorari are the same. 

In conclusion, concerning the submission 
that the Court has no power to remit the 
award in the case at bar, Mr. Justice Ayles- 
worth stated that the Court would have 
such power under the Arbitration Act were 
it not for the excluding provisions of Sec- 
tion 34(10) of the Labour Relations Act; 
altogether apart from any such statutory 
power of remission, and since there was 
error in law on the face of the award, the 
Court may order the award of the statutory 
Board in question to be brought before it 
on certiorari and remit the award to the 
Board for reconsideration and redetermina- 
tion and, if necessary, grant a mandamus 
for that purpose. 

The Court of Appeal allowed the appeal 
and remitted the arbitration award to the 
arbitrators for their reconsideration and 
redetermination pursuant to the terms of 
the collective agreement of December 29, 
1960. Re Civic Employees' Union No. 43 
and Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto, 
(1962), 34 D.L.R. (2d), Part 10, p. 711. 

Ontario High Court... 

. . . rules Ontario Food Terminal Board, being an 
employer, is subject to Labour Relations Act 

On August 20, 1962, Mr. Justice Schatz 
of the Ontario High Court, in certiorari 
proceedings, upheld a certification order 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



61 



issued by the Ontario Labour Relations 
Board and held that the Ontario Food 
Terminal Board established under the On- 
tario Food Terminal Act is not an agent 
of the Crown either under the Crown 
Agency Act or under common law prin- 
ciples, and hence, being an employer, is 
subject to the Labour Relations Act. 

On June 6, 1961, the Ontario Labour 
Relations Board certified Local 419 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers as 
a bargaining agent of all employees (except 
certain persons) of the Ontario Food 
Terminal Board in Metropolitan Toronto. 

The Board applied to the Court, in cer- 
tiorari proceedings, to quash the certifica- 
tion order on the ground that the Board 
is a Crown agency within the meaning of 
the Ontario Crown Agency Act and at 
common law, and therefore not subject to 
the Ontario Labour Relations Act. 

There is no provision in the Ontario 
Labour Relations Act nor in the Ontario 
Food Terminal Act (under which the 
Board in question was established) that 
would make the provisions of the Labour 
Relations Act applicable to the Board. 

In order to establish whether the Board 
in question is a Crown agency, it was 
necessary for the court to determine 



whether the Board is "owned, controlled or 
operated by Her Majesty in right of Ontario, 
or by the Government of Ontario, or under 
the authority of the Legislature or the 
Lieutenant Governor in Council" either 
under the Crown Agency Act or at common 
law. 

The examination of the powers of the 
Board and its position under the Act con- 
stituting it led the Court to the conclusion 
that the Ontario Food Terminal Board 
is neither owned, controlled nor operated 
by the Crown or by the Government of 
Ontario or under the authority of the Legis- 
lature or of the Lieutenant Governor in 
Council, and is thus outside of the pre- 
scription of Section 1 of the Crown Agency 
Act quoted above. 

Further, the examination of the relevant 
legal decisions led the Court to the con- 
clusion that the amount of control exer- 
cised by the Crown over the functioning 
of the Board is not such as to make the 
Board a Crown agency under the common 
law. 

The Court dismissed the Board's appli- 
cation and upheld the certification order 
issued by the Ontario Labour Relations 
Board. Regina v. Ontario Labour Relations 
Board, Ex Parte Ontario Food Terminal 
Board, (1962), 35 D.L.R. (2d), Part 1, 
p. 6. 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

British Columbia increases minimum wage in manufacturing, mercantile and hotel 
and catering industries. New Brunswick sets minimum wage in forest industry 



In British Columbia, three new orders 
issued by the Board of Industrial Relations 
set a minimum wage of $1 an hour for 
employees in the manufacturing, mercantile 
and hotel and catering industries, with 
provision for lower rates during the first 
three months of employment in the industry. 
The orders also require the payment of 
time and one-half the regular rate after 40 
hours in a week. 

In New Brunswick, a minimum wage of 
$1.05 an hour was established for time 
workers in forestry and logging operations, 
effective April 1, 1963. 

In Alberta, the CSA Code for oil burning 
equipment was adopted with some modifi- 
cations. 

British Columbia Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts 

The British Columbia Board of Industrial 
Relations recently issued three new orders 
increasing the minimum wages of men and 



women in the manufacturing, mercantile 
and hotel and catering industries to $1 an 
hour with provision for lower rates during 
the first three months of employment in 
these industries. Another new feature is 
the requirement to pay overtime after 40 
hours in a week. 

Before the orders were issued, the Board 
held hearings at Vancouver and Kelowna 
and received representations from a num- 
ber of interested parties. 

The new orders were gazetted as B.C. 
Reg. 163/62 to 165/62 on November 29 
and went into force on January 1. 

Coverage 

The coverage of the orders is unchanged. 
The new order for the hotel and catering 
industry (B.C. Reg. 163/62) applies to 
hotels, lodging houses, clubs, restaurants, 
hospitals, nursing homes and other places 
where lodging is furnished or food is 



62 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



cooked, prepared or served, for which a 
charge is made, including kitchens in con- 
nection with industrial or commercial estab- 
lishments, office buildings or schools. 

All employees in such places are covered 
except graduate nurses, student nurses and 
students employed in the schools in which 
they are enrolled. Pages are exempt from 
some of the minimum wage provisions but 
are subject to other provisions of the order. 

The revised order for the manufacturing 
industry (B.C. Reg. 164/62) covers all 
operations in or incidental to the making, 
preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, 
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the 
parts of, installing, or adapting for use or 
sale any article or commodity. 

As formerly, the order for the mercantile 
industry (B.C. Reg. 165/62) governs all 
employees in the wholesale or retail trade. 

All three orders exclude employees sub- 
ject to another order and persons em- 
ployed in a supervisory, managerial or con- 
fidential capacity who are exempt from the 
Hours of Work Act. 

Minimum Rates 

As indicated above, the general minimum 
now applicable in these three industries is 
$1 an hour. Previously, the orders for the 
wholesale and retail trade and for the hotel 
and catering industry set a general minimum 
of 65 cents an hour. In the manufacturing 
industry, the minimum for experienced em- 
ployees was 65 cents an hour for women 
and 75 cents for men. 

In line with the usual practice, some 
exemptions from the $l-an-hour minimum 
are provided. Although learners rates as 
such are no longer referred to, an employee 
may be paid at a lower rate during the first 
three months of employment in any of these 
industries without the employer's having to 
obtain a permit from the Board. (A month's 
employment is defined as a period of 22 
working shifts.) During the first month, 
the minimum now payable in the three 
industries is 85 cents an hour. In the second 
month, the minimum is 90 cents an hour 
and in the third month, 95 cents an hour. 

Formerly, the order for the manufactur- 
ing and mercantile industries authorized 
lower rates for learners with permits from 
the Board, the minimum being 45 cents an 
hour in the first two weeks of employment 
in these industries, 50 cents in the second 
two-week period and 55 cents in the third. 

An exception is again made for a part- 
time worker, apprentice or handicapped 
employee with a permit from the Board to 
work for less than the prescribed minimum 
wage. Such an employee must be paid the 
rate specified in the permit. 



Overtime 

A new feature of the orders is that they 
require the payment of time and one-half 
the regular rate after 8 hours in a day and 
40 hours in a week. Previously the overtime 
rate was payable after 8 hours in a day and 
44 hours in a week. 

An exception from the 40-hour standard 
is permitted in places where, in accordance 
with the Hours of Work Act, the Board has 
approved an agreement between the em- 
ployer and the employee to average hours 
over a fixed period. In such cases, an em- 
ployee must be paid the premium rate for 
hours worked in excess of an average of 
40 hours a week in the specified period. 

Daily Guarantee 

The daily guarantee provisions are simi- 
lar to those in other British Columbia 
minimum wage orders. An employee must 
be paid at his regular rate of pay for the 
entire time spent at his workplace in 
response to a call, with a minimum of two 
hours pay for reporting for work and of 
four hours if he commences work, subject 
to the usual qualifications. 

School students reporting for work on 
a school day must receive at least two 
hours pay. 

Hours 

Subject to the exceptions provided in the 
Hours of Work Act, hours may not exceed 
8 in the day or 44 in the week. 

In the hotel and catering industry, how- 
ever, employees may work up to 9 hours in 
a day in case of emergency provided the 
44-hour weekly limit is not exceeded. 

Weekly Rest 

Every employee must be given a weekly 
rest of 32 consecutive hours. In the excep- 
tional cases where this is unsuitable, the 
Board may approve a different arrange- 
ment upon the joint application of the 
employer and the employee. 

General Provisions 

The three orders contain the usual pro- 
visions respecting semi-monthly pay, the 
posting of orders and work schedules and 
the keeping of records and employee re- 
gisters. 

Special Provisions, Hotel 
and Catering Industry 

As before, the order for the hotel and 
catering industry forbids an employer to 
require an employee, as a condition of 
his employment, to partake of meals or 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



63 



make use of lodging provided by the em- 
ployer. If the employee voluntarily agrees, 
however, to accept board or lodging from 
the employer and if, in the opinion of the 
Board, the meals are inadequate, the lodg- 
ing is unsuitable or the charge or deduc- 
tion is unreasonable, it may require the 
employer to adjust the rates charged. 

Charges or deductions from employees' 
wages for accidental breakages are again 
prohibited. 

As formerly, employers in the hotel and 
catering industry are required to provide 
suitable restrooms and adequate toilet and 
washroom facilities for their employees. If 
an employer fails to provide proper facili- 
ties, the Board may order him to make 
the necessary changes within a specified 
time. 

New Brunswick Minimum Wage Act 

An order of the New Brunswick Mini- 
mum Wage Board establishing a minimum 
wage of $1.05 an hour for time workers 
in forest and logging operations was gazetted 
November 28 and is to go into force on 
April 1, 1963. 

According to press reports, the Minister 
of Labour stated that, before issuing the 
order, the Board had conducted about six 
months research into the forest industry, 
with particular emphasis on the economic 
impact of minimum wages on the industry. 
Detailed analyses and comparisons of wage 
levels, markets, production techniques and 
changing patterns in the industry were made, 
the Minister said. 

Coverage 

The coverage of the new order is similar 
to that of the Quebec forestry order (L.G., 
June 1962, p. 734). It governs all forestry 
operations including: road building and 
other construction and maintenance work, 
forest improvement work, reforestation 
projects, driving operations, forest fire 
protective work and clearing operations. 
Caterers, contractors, subcontractors and 
intermediaries connected with any of the 
above operations are specifically covered, 
as well as mills and other places producing 
lumber to be used exclusively in logging 
operations. 

The order also covers all logging opera- 
tions, including cutting, transportation, load- 
ing of wood on boats or railroad cars, and 
barking and slashing of wood before load- 
ing on boats or cars, but does not include 
the processing of wood outside the forest. 

All employees in forestry and logging 
operations are covered except: officers, offi- 
cials and persons employed in a confidential 



capacity; crown employees; workers em- 
ployed in mills or places where the wood 
is worked or processed, except employees 
in sawmills producing lumber for exclusive 
use in logging operations; persons engaged 
in transporting lumber outside the forest; 
and emergency fire fighters. 

Minimum Rates and Overtime 

The $1.05-an-hour minimum for time 
workers is based on a 9-hour day, 54-hour 
week. One and one-half the minimum rate 
must be paid for all hours worked in excess 
of 54 hours in a week. The minimum over- 
time rate will not apply to stream driving 
until June 1, 1963, however. 

Pieceworkers are to receive at least $9.45 
for a nine-hour day. Since their hours are 
not fixed, pieceworkers are not entitled to 
overtime. 

Deductions 

An employer may not charge an em- 
ployee more than $1.65 a day for board 
and lodging. The maximum charge for 
single meals is 55 cents. 

Pay Periods 

The order stipulates that all employees in 
forest and logging operations must be paid 
at least once a month. 

Annual Review 

The order will be reviewed annually. 

Alberta Fire Prevention Act 

Alberta has replaced its regulations 
designed to ensure the safe operation of oil 
burning equipment. Alta Reg. 565/62, 
issued under the Fire Prevention Act, 
adopts, for the first time, the Canadian 
Standards Association Standard B 139- 1962, 
Installation Code for Oil Burning Equip- 
ment, with some modifications. Gazetted 
October 31, it rescinds Alta. Reg. 655/57. 

The modifications are in respect of cer- 
tain provisions of the Code relating to 
permits and to the stipulation that oil 
burning equipment must not be installed 
unless approved by a recognized testing 
laboratory. The latter provision will not 
apply to portable oil burning equipment 
and brooder oil burners until one year after 
the regulations came into force, provided, 
however, that these types of equipment are 
acceptable to the Fire Commissioner or his 
officials. 

The regulations further provide that no 
person may sell or offer for sale an oil 
burner or oil burning equipment unless it 
is approved by an acceptable testing agency. 



64 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



This provision does not apply to portable 
oil burning equipment or brooder oil 
burners during a period of one year after 
the regulations came into force. 

An obligation is imposed on the seller, 
installer and user of oil burners and oil 



burning equipment to give the Fire Com- 
missioner whatever information he may 
require with respect to the manufacturer, 
place of manufacture, trade name, certifica- 
tion of approval, and literature concerning 
the sale and installation of such equipment. 



New Farm Safety Regulations In Great Britain 



Great Britain has issued new regulations 
designed to protect farm workers against 
the risks of bodily injury while working 
at field machines in agriculture. A field 
machine is defined to mean any machine 
used in agriculture other than one for 
stationary use only. 

The regulations, cited as the Agriculture 
(Field Machinery) Regulations, 1962, were 
made under the Agriculture (Safety, Health 
and Welfare Provisions) Act, 1956, which 
is administered by the Department of Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food in England and 
Wales and by the Secretary of State in 
Scotland. 

The most effective way to reduce accidents 
to agricultural workers to the minimum is 
to ensure that suitable guards and other 
safety devices are incorporated when the 
field machine is manufactured, thus pre- 
venting an employer from acquiring a new 
machine that is unsafe. It is also important 
to ensure that field machines rented to 
employers are suitably guarded. The regula- 
tions include provisions to achieve both these 
objectives. 

To this end, effective from July 1, 1964, 
no person may sell to a purchaser for use 
in agriculture in Great Britain any field 
machine that is being sold for the first 
time, unless it complies with the safety 
requirements contained in Part II of the 
regulations. 

A similar prohibition with regard to rent- 
ing provides that no person may let on hire 
for use in agriculture in Great Britain any 
field machine that does not comply with 
the requirements of Part II. The effective 
date on which this provision applies to a 
particular type of field machine is deter- 
mined by the category in which it falls in 
Schedule 2. 

The regulations will come into effect 
in several stages in order to facilitate the 
redesign of new field machines to be sold 
on or after July 1, 1964, and the remodelling 
of machines that are not new to meet the 
standards prescribed. Certain general re- 
quirements that were practical to apply 
immediately to field machines came into 
force in 1962. All provisions relating to 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

63569-8—5 



• JANUARY 7963 



new field machines will be in effect by July 
1, 1964. A field machine is new if its first 
sale since manufacture, to a purchaser for 
use by him in agriculture, is made on or 
after July 1, 1964. Field machines that are 
not new are divided into five categories and 
the main regulations governing them come 
into force at various dates between July 1, 
1964 and January 1, 1968. The five classes 
of field machines and the dates on which 
the regulations come into operation are set 
out in Schedule 2. 

A field machine is defined to mean any 
machine used in agriculture other than one 
for stationary use only. 

Main Part of Regulations 

The main part of the regulations (Part 
II) consists of provisions designed to make 
the machine, including its components and 
associated equipment, safe for the worker 
to operate. The employer of a worker em- 
ployed in agriculture is prohibited from 
causing or permitting him to work at a 
field machine that does not comply with 
these requirements. 

In addition to specific requirements for 
the protection of workers against risks aris- 
ing from the use of field machines generally, 
the regulations lay down definite rules for 
the guarding of the machine. The latter 
apply to certain types of field machines 
(power-driven potato spinners, chain saws, 
rotary hedge cutters and pick-up balers) 
and to a number of component parts of 
all field machines (such as shafting, pulleys, 
flywheels, etc.); they require the machine 
or component part to be so situated or 
guarded as to protect workers from coming 
in contact with it directly or by means of 
their clothes. 

The regulations provide also for the 
proper maintenance of machinery, for 
properly constructed standing platforms, 
seats and footrests, and for a safe and 
convenient means of mounting and dis- 
mounting from a machine. They also require 
a device to be provided by which a machine 
may be quickly stopped. 



65 



Details of Requirements 

The provisions concerning the guarding 
of components of field machines are appli- 
cable to shafting, pulleys, flywheels, gear- 
ing, sprockets, belts, chains, wings or blades 
of fans, and the reciprocating parts of field 
machines. There are certain exclusions. A 
component that is power-driven or oper- 
ated by a ground wheel must be so situated 
or guarded that the worker is protected 
from coming in contact with it. Conveyor 
belts or chains must be properly guarded at 
run-on points and elsewhere to protect the 
worker from injury. 

Other provisions relating to specific field 
machines lay down detailed requirements 
for the guarding of the machine. These 
apply to the digging reel of a power-driven 
potato spinner, chain saws, whether de- 
signed for operation by one or more per- 
sons, hedge cutters and pick-up balers. 

The guarding of the operative parts of 
certain power-driven field machines is also 
provided for, i.e., those with rotating knives, 
tines, flails or other similar parts operating 
in or near the ground. A guard must cover 
the operative parts of the machine and must 
be installed as near to them as possible. 
Special provisions apply to operative parts 
that rotate in a vertical or horizontal plane, 
or nearly so. 

Unless the cutter bar of a field machine 
has a reel extending at least one foot over 
the fingers, the points of the fingers must 
be completely and securely guarded, except 
when the cutter bar is in use or is being 
repaired or adjusted. 

Every prime mover (engines or motor) 
must be fitted with a device to stop it 
quickly. The device is required to be readily 
accessible to the driver or worker operating 
the machine at the normal operating posi- 
tion, to be operable with light manual 
pressure, and to have its purpose and 
method of operation clearly indicated. When 
the device is set in the "off" or "stop" posi- 
tion, it must not be possible to restart the 
prime mover without resetting the device 
manually. 

Every manually operated device fitted to 
a self-propelled field machine to lock the 
differential gear of the mutually opposite 
driving wheels must be so designed that 
the position of the controlling mechanism 
clearly indicates to the driver whether or 
not the gear is locked. 

Every manually operated cock or valve 
that operates or isolates any part of the 
hydraulic or pneumatic system of a field 
machine must have an indicator to show the 
effect of movement of the cock or valve. 



Every two-wheeled machine with a draw- 
bar must, under specified conditions, be 
fitted with a jack to raise and lower the 
drawbar and to prevent it from falling. 

To eliminate the hazards of pointed 
hooks and spikes, the regulations prohibit 
their use in attaching any bag or container 
to a field machine. 

Every field machine (other than a trailer) 
on which a worker may have to stand 
during its operation must have a platform, 
constructed according to specifications, 
affording the worker adequate and flat 
standing space and a firm foothold, and 
the platform must be fitted with toeboards, 
guard rails and other safety devices. 

To protect the worker from falling off 
and from getting his feet and legs injured, 
every field machine on which a worker sits 
while it is being operated must be fitted 
with a seat of adequate strength, which 
either has a backrest or is so shaped as to 
protect the worker from slipping from the 
seat. Footrests are also required to prevent 
contact of the worker's feet with any mov- 
ing part of the machine, including ground 
wheels or track gear. If the ground wheel 
or track gear is adjacent to a seat or foot- 
rest, it must also be fitted with a guard 
to protect the worker's legs and feet. 

To prevent the worker from falling in 
getting on and off the machine, especially 
in the case of higher machines, every field 
machine on which the worker is required to 
work more than 21 inches from the ground 
must have a suitable mounting step, not 
more than 21 inches high, combined with 
a handhold. 

The detachment or failure of towing 
devices during the movement of field 
machines can result in serious injury to 
the driver of the prime mover itself or to 
a worker on the machine being towed. The 
regulations require, therefore, that towing 
devices used in connection with a field 
machine must be so constructed, fitted and 
maintained as to be secure for the purpose. 
Where a coupling pin is used, it must be 
firmly secured in position. 

Proper maintenance of field machinery 
is important to ensure that accidents do 
not occur due to failure to detect defective 
parts. Every field machine must be so 
maintained that it is safe for the worker to 
use it. Safety devices must be of adequate 
strength, and properly secured in position 
and maintained. 

Dangerous Acts 

Workers and other persons are prohibited 
from doing certain dangerous acts. A worker 
may not ride on the drawbar of a field 
machine while it is towing or propelling 

(Continued on page 73) 



66 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND 
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Total of claimants at end of October up by more than 20 per cent from number 
at end of September, statistics* show. Payments during month up 25 per cent 



Claimants for unemployment insurance 
benefit numbered 244,100 on October 31. 
This figure was more than 20 per cent 
higher than the end-of-September total of 
197,800, but was nearly 10 per cent less 
than the 268,700 reported on October 31, 
1961. 

More than 80 per cent of the increase 
since the previous month was made up of 
males. 

Initial and Renewal Claims 

Initial and renewal claims filed in October 
numbered 150,400, which was more than 
50 per cent greater than the total of 98,300 
in September, but 5 per cent less than that 
of 158,100 in October last year. 

The increase in initial and renewal claims 
between September and October this year 
was considerably greater than during the 
same period last year, when it was 30 per 
cent. Monthly averages of claims, however, 
have been consistently lower this year than 
last year. 

About 142,800, or 95 per cent, of the 
150,400 claims filed during October arose 
out of separations from employment during 
the month, which was practically the same 
proportion as in September. 

Beneficiaries and Benefit Payments 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries in October wast estimated at 152,- 
900, compared with 142,600 in September, 
and, 173,300 in October 1961. 

Payments during the month amounted to 
$15,800,000, which was about 25 per cent 
more than the total of $12,700,000 in Sep- 
tember, but nearly 10 per cent below the 
$17,100,000 reported in October 1961. 

The average weekly payment was $23.42 
in October, $23.36 in September, and $23.52 
in October last year. 

* See Table E-l to E-4, p. 97. 



In a comparison of current unemployment 
insurance statistics with those for a previous 
period, consideration should be given to 
relevant factors other than numbers, such as 
the opening and closing of seasonal indus- 
tries, increase in area population, influence 
of weather conditions, and the general em- 
ployment situation. 

Claimants should not be interpreted either 
as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total 
job applicants." 

A claimant's unemployment register is 
placed in the "live file" at the local office 
as soon as the claim is made. As a result, 
the count of claimants at any given time 
inevitably includes some whose claims are 
in process. 



Insurance Registrations 

Reports for October showed that insur- 
ance books or contribution cards had been 
issued to 4,765,978 employees who had 
made contributions to the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund at one time or another 
since April 1. 

At October 31, registered employers num- 
bered 337,244, a decrease of 61 since 
September 30. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During October, 9,907 investigations were 
conducted by enforcement officers across 
Canada. Of these, 6,054 were spot checks 
of postal and counter claims to verify the 
fulfilment of statutory conditions, and 200 
were miscellaneous investigations. The re- 
maining 3,653 were investigations in con- 
nection with claimants suspected of making 
false statements to obtain benefits. 

Prosecutions were begun in 268 cases, 
67 against employers and 201 against claim- 
ants.* 

Punitive disqualifications as a result of 
false statements or misrepresentations by 
claimants numbered 1,536.* 



* These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



67 



Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received by the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund in October totalled $30,- 
065,935.05, compared with $28,446,807.50 
in September and $29,356,750.29 in October 
1961. 



Benefits paid in October totalled $15,753,- 
718.61, compared with $12,664,200.98 in 
September and $17,115,047.91 in October 
1961. 

The balance in the Fund on October 31 
was $89,928,587.38; on September 30 it was 
$75,616,370.94 and on October 31, 1961 it 
was $154,737,081.07. 



Monthly Report on the Operations of 

the National Employment Service 

The number of vacancies notified by This total, as with placements generally, 

employers to local employment offices, and although reflecting a ' seasonal reduction, 

the number of placements effected, declined represented a year-to-year increase, 

seasonally during the three months ended Vacancies notified to local offices during 

November. November followed much the same pattern 

But placement totals, compared with the as placements. The 130,700 vacancies were 

same month in all previous years since an increase of 6.9 per cent over November 

1945, continued to set records for each 1961. Vacancies for women amounted to 

month. some 43,800, a total 13.9 per cent higher 

In November 1962, some 108,400 place- than that last y ear and significantly higher 

ments were effected— 10.1 per cent higher than the 3.7-per-cent increase in vacancies 

than the same month in 1961, 39.8 per for men > which totalled some 86,900 in 

cent higher than in 1960, and higher than November. 

in any November since 1945. Some 75,000 Ud to November, a cumulative 1962 total 

of these placements were of men, a total of some 1*456,000 vacancies had been 

6.5 per cent higher than last year's. Place- notified to local employment offices, an 

ments of women increased by a substantial increase of 20.7 per cent over the corre- 

18.9 per cent over November 1961. sponding 11 months in 1961. The 1962 

The regions' share in the improvement eleven - month * otal wa * hi S he [ * an for 

in placements varied considerably. The a «y corresponding period since 1947. 

Atlantic Region recorded a decrease. Per- Cumulative total placements, January to 

centage changes over November 1961, by November 1962 amounted to approximately 

regions, were as follows: 1,238,600, which was 21.0 per cent higher 

than the total in the corresponding period 

Atlantic 10.6 f 1961 and higher also than in the same 

Quebec +11.1 11 months in any year since 1945. 

Ontario +16.5 In summary, labour demand as reflected 

Prairie + 4.0 in the operations of the National Employ- 
Pacific + 7.8 ment Service has been strong throughout 

the year, and although tapering off in the 

Some 4,350 of the placements effected in normal seasonal fashion, it remains at a 

November involved the movement of work- significantly higher level than in previous 

ers from one local office area to another. years. 



82nd Meeting, National Employment Committee 



The National Employment Committee at 
its 82nd meeting expressed strong approval 
of the Treasury Board's act, at the instiga- 
tion of Hon. Michael Starr, Minister of 
Labour, in inserting into contract forms 
between federal government departments 
and contractors the clause requiring recruit- 
ment of labour for all government con- 
tracts exclusively through the NES. 

This step had been proposed by the 
Moncton local employment committee, and 



passed by the Atlantic regional employment 
committee to the National Employment 
Committee, who in turn submitted the 
proposal to the Minister. 

The Committee urged that steps be taken 
to ensure that the National Employment 
Service's staff needs shall continue to be 
met, in view of the special and direct 
contributions the NES has to make in 
organizing the work force and increasing 
employment. 



68 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY T963 



Although it recognized the necessity for 
controls, under the Government's present 
program, on the filling of vacancies in the 
Civil Service, the Committee was unani- 
mous in stressing the importance of main- 
taining NES staff at the most effective level 
possible in order to carry out its employ- 
ment responsibilities. 

The Committee, as a result of its study 
of the question whether the NES is ade- 
quate in the light of present-day conditions, 
resolved that the National Employment 
Service was to be commended on the 
general efficiency of its operations with the 
resources at present at its command, but 
that improved and augmented services in 
a number of specialized areas could add 
greatly to its effectiveness. Such expansion 
should be kept in mind in all future plan- 
ning for the NES, the Committee said. 



The National Employment Committee 
consists of representatives of employers' 
and employees' organizations, and of na- 
tional organizations of women, veterans, 
agriculture and welfare. The Committee's 
function is to advise and assist the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission in carrying 
out the operations of the National Em- 
ployment Service, and to meet with the 
Commission and with officers of the NES 
at frequent intervals to submit recommen- 
dations on the NES and to consider reports 
from the Commission. 

Inclusion in the Committee membership 
of a representative of national educational 
organizations was urged, and the National 
Employment Service was requested to nego- 
tiate the matter further with the Canadian 
Education Association. 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB 2072, November 15, 1962 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, 57 years of age, filed an initial applica- 
tion for benefit in Vancouver on January 
29, 1962. She was registered for employ- 
ment as a telephone operator, as which she 
had worked for the B.C. Telephone Com- 
pany, Vancouver, from 1940 to October 24, 
1961, when, she said, she was "laid off 
due to retirement age." 

She explained that she had not reported 
sooner because she had broken her ankle 
on October 24. She submitted a medical 
certificate dated January 29, 1962 that said 
she had sustained an injury to her right 
ankle on October 24, 1961 but was now 
"able to go back to work." 

In her application she said she was 
"capable and available full time, Greater 
Vancouver area." 

On February 1 the local office asked her 
to state the specific type or types of employ- 
ment she was available for. On February 2 
she replied that she was available for "full- 
time PBX work." 

Her claim was allowed and benefit was 
paid. 

On April 2, a report of possible dis- 
qualification (Form UIC 493A) was made, 
stating that she had been told, by telephone, 
of a civil service competition for a tele- 
phone operator. She had replied that she 
could not work shifts and could work only 
between 8.00 a.m. and 5.30 p.m. On the 
form it had been noted that "Prospects are 



remote as she has no typing skill and very 
few orders for PBX operators without typ- 
ing are received." 

On April 4, the local office wrote a letter 
to the claimant. The questions asked and 
her answers were: 

Q. What hours per day are you available 
for work? 

A. 8:30-5. 

Q. Why can you not accept shift work? 

A. Because it upsets my stomach and I get 
nervous tension. 

On the evidence before him, the insur- 
ance officer on April 10 disqualified the 
claimant and suspended benefit (a) from 
April 1 to May 12 inclusive on the ground 
that she had, without good cause, refused 
to apply for a situation in suitable employ- 
ment with the Civil Service Commission 
and (b) from April 1 on the grounds that 
she was not available for work inasmuch 
as she was unable to accept shift work, 
which was considered a normal requirement 
of her registered occupation (sections 59 
(1) (a) and 54 (2) (a) of the Act.) 

On April 13 she appealed to a board of 
referees, stating: "I do not feel I should 
have been disqualified for unemployment 
insurance because I prefer straight hours. 
However, I am willing to take shift work 
if there are any available jobs." 

The claimant attended the hearing of 
her case by a board of referees in Van- 
couver, on May 2. The board, by a unani- 
mous decision, confirmed both disqualifica- 
tions imposed by the insurance officer and 
disallowed the appeal. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



69 



The Federation of Telephone Workers 
of British Columbia (Traffic Division), of 
which the claimant is a member, appealed 
to the Umpire on June 11. The appeal 
said: 

In regard to [the first disqualification], first, 
the letter notifying her of the interview did 
not arrive at her residence until the day the 
interview was to be held, at which time she 
was reporting at the Unemployment Insurance 
Office at her appointed time. When she returned 
home and read the letter, it was too late to 
apply that day (Friday) so she telephoned the 
insurance office on the following Monday and 
discussed the listed competition, explaining why 
she had not applied at the appointed time. 
During this telephone conversation she explained 
that she did not feel the position was suitable 
as it involved shift work, but did not refuse 
to apply as the interview date was already 
passed. 

The second question: Indefinite disqualifica- 
tion from April 1, 1962. The claimant was 
disqualified on the grounds that she has failed 
to prove she was available for work, yet she 
stated on February 2: "I am available for full 
time P.B.X. work". On April 6, in answer to 
the question, "What hours are you available 
for work?" she stated, "8:30 to 5:00" and 
her reasons. Therefore we do not feel that a 
disqualification was justified. 

The Insurance Officer stated that "prospects 
are remote" and "very few orders for P.B.X. 
operators," as another reason for disqualifica- 
tion. This would indicate that there are some 
opportunities in this field and we feel the 
applicant would have a possibility of obtaining 
employment. 

In response to a request from the local 
office, dated June 14, 1962, for information 
regarding the claimant's separation from the 
employ of the B.C. Telephone Company, 
the Employee Benefits Supervisor of the 
Company stated: 

. . . [claimant] retired on pension from this 
Company under the terms of the Company 
Pension Plan, which provides that any female 
employee who reaches 55 years of age with 20 
years' continuous service may elect to retire 
on pension whenever she wishes. The com- 
pulsory retirement age is 65 years. 

[Claimant] elected to retire under the fore- 
going clause on November 1, 1961. 

Regarding the circumstances under which 
the claimant was made aware of the employ- 
ment vacancy, the local office reported that 
the Notice to Report (Form 715A) was 
issued on March 27 or 28, and the inter- 
view with the Employment Officer was 
set for March 29 or 30. Additional com- 
ments were: 

Claimant did not receive the 71 5 A until 
after she had been in our office for her weekly 
call to the Insurance Branch. She telephoned 
on the Monday, April 2, and as the com- 
petition was still open, she was advised of 
the particulars; she declined the offer for the 
reasons stated on the 493A [report of possible 
disqualification]. The [notice to report] was not 
sent to Insurance Branch because she did tele- 
phone to explain and was advised of the 
position via telephone. 

Paragraph I of U.I.C. 575A [Appeal to the 
Umpire] is not true as claimant refused to go 
to the position, which was still open at the 



time of the telephone call, on the grounds she 
did not want shifts. She can only work 8-5:30 
P.M. 

The claimant still could have applied up 
to and including April 2 had she been really 
interested. 

Considerations and Conclusions: The re- 
cord shows that the claimant was offered 
a situation in suitable employment and that 
she refused to apply therefor without good 
cause. The Federation's contention that it 
was too late to apply for the position is 
contrary to the placement officer's state- 
ment that the position was still open at the 
time of her telephone call to the local 
office on April 2, 1962. 

Furthermore, the claimant's allegation 
that shift work "upsets my stomach and I 
get nervous tension" is not substantiated 
and, therefore, cannot be accepted as satis- 
factory evidence in that respect, particularly 
in view of her subsequent statement "I am 
willing to accept shift work if there are any 
available jobs." I consequently decide to 
maintain the disqualification which was im- 
posed on the claimant pursuant to section 
59(1) (a) of the Act. 

As to the question of the claimant's 
availability for work, there is evidence that 
she could have continued to work for the 
B.C. Telephone Company until she would 
have reached the age of 65 years, but 
elected to retire some eight years earlier. 
This and the fact that she refused to 
apply for suitable employment without good 
cause tend to show that she was not very 
anxious to work except on terms suitable 
to her. 

In view of the foregoing, I am not 
prepared to question the unanimous finding 
of fact of the board of referees that the 
claimant failed to prove that she was 
available for work within the meaning of 
section 54 (2) (a) of the Act. 

I consequently dismiss the Federation's 
appeal. 

Decision CUB 2076, November 15, 1962 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, 56 years of age, filed an initial appli- 
cation for benefit on February 11, 1962. 
In the application she stated she had 
worked as a saleswoman for a manufacturer 
and distributor of cosmetics from June 23, 
1945 to February 15, 1962, when she was 
laid off because, she said, "I was told that 
they were retiring me." Her rate of pay 
was $100 a week, plus expenses. 

In the Confirmation of Separation the 
employer said: 

Increased territory was considered too heavy 
for a woman; therefore [the claimant] was 
withdrawn from the field. A position in beauty 



70 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



division was offered to her, which she was 
subsequently not able to fill satisfactorily due 
to personality clash. 
The claim was allowed. 

In the early part of May the claimant 
wrote to the insurance officer to report that, 
on or about March 21, she had received 
"termination pay" amounting to $5,200 
gross. 

On May 3 the employer wrote to the 
local office: 

... in consideration of the number of years 
during which [the claimant] had served this 
Company, it was mutually agreed that she 
would be paid from the date of her leaving 
in the amount of one full year's salary. 

The only description in your letter which 
does not actually fit her payment is "Gratuity 
or Bonus." The amount which was not sepa- 
rately broken down, was actually in lieu of 
termination pay, pay in lieu of notice, retire- 
ment credits, or severance pay. 

As I stated previously, it was a payment 
based on a mutual agreement negotiated through 
[the claimant's] legal advisers. 

On May 8 the insurance officer notified 
the claimant that her earnings were deter- 
mined to be $100 a week beginning Feb- 
ruary 18, and each subsequent week, to 
and including the week beginning February 
3, 1963 (Regulations 172 and 173 (8)) and 
that the unemployment benefits she had 
been paid were considered to be an over- 
payment, "in the amount of $243." 

On May 16, [the claimant's solicitors] 
wrote to the manager of the local office: 

We acted for [the claimant] at the time of 
her termination of employment ... It was 
this firm's intention to commence an action 
on [her] behalf against her former employer 
for wrongful dismissal. After numerous consul- 
tations and correspondence, [claimant's] claim 
was settled. By way of settlement for her 
wrongful dismissal she received the sum of 
$5,200, less various deductions, which repre- 
sented one year's salary. This payment was not 
in any way in the form of a salary but rather 
as a settlement for her claim for wrongful 
dismissal. 

Under the circumstances we respectfully sub- 
mit that your notification is incorrect and 
would ask you to look into the matter further 
as it is our contention that [claimant] is en- 
titled to unemployment insurance benefits. 

On May 22, 1962, the regional claims 
officer wrote to the claimant's solicitors 
and said that, as it was apparent the claim- 
ant was not satisfied with the insurance 
officer's ruling, their letter dated May 16, 
1962, quoted above, would be considered 
as her appeal to a board of referees. 

The majority decision of the board of 
referees, which heard the case on June 7, 
1962, reads: 

The majority of the board in reviewing the 
evidence dealt with the employer's statement 
contained in their letter of May 3, 1962 . . . 

It was also stated at that time in view of 
her service with the Company certain monies 
would be paid in lieu of notice. The claimant 
then sought legal counsel and a suit was 



instituted for wrongful dismissal for an unstated 
amount of money. After negotiations, accord- 
ing to [solicitor], it was mutually agreed on 
that this amount would be $5,200, equivalent 
to one year's salary. The claimant through her 
representative maintained that this was for an 
out-of-court settlement for wrongful dismissal. 

It was further pointed out that pension bene- 
fits were terminated as of date of dismissal 
and that no amount of a former contributory 
portion would be allowed to be payable by 
the claimant. 

The majority of the board has reviewed 
section 172 and 173 (1) and (8) of the Regu- 
lations in attempting to arrive at a decision. 
In no instance can the majority of the board 
find a parallel case. 

It is the majority of the board's decision 
therefore, that . . . this is a payment for 
wrongful dismissal and therefore should not 
be considered as earnings for the purpose of 
benefit and that it does not come within the 
173 (1) or (8) of the Regulations. 

From the evidence produced, which the 
majority of the board feel was not in the 
possession of the insurance officer at the time 
of his decision, we reverse the insurance offi- 
cer's decision and allow the appeal. 

The chairman of the board of referees, 
who dissented, said: 

I disagree with the decision of the majority 
of the board for the following reasons: In 
reviewing the evidence I find that a letter dated 
May 3, 1962, from the employer . . . states 
these facts. In paragraph three, and I quote, 
"it was mutually agreed that she would be 
paid from the date of her leaving in the amount 
of one full year's salary," which at the rate of 
$100 per week would be a total of $5,200. 

In paragraph tour. "The only description m 
your letter wnicn does not actually ht her 
payment is "Gratuity or Bonus". The amount 
whicn was not separately broken down was 
actually m lieu oi termination pay, pay m 
lieu oi notice, retirement credits or severance 
pay/' 

1 feel that these items should be especially 
broken down, more particularly, m lieu of 
termmation pay and pay in lieu of notice. Also 
on page tnree wmle it was stipulated by the 
claimant's solicitor that this was tor wrongful 
dismissal or, as he explained, tor damages, 
but mere is no evidence presented as to wnat 
the damages were. .Further, by way of settle- 
ment tor a wrongtul dismissal sue received 
the sum of $5,200, less deductions, which repre- 
sented one year's salary. 

While there is no CUB's of previous 
Umpire's Decisions, 1 feel that the amount 
received wnicn when broken down would 
stipulate how mucn snould be allotted as earn- 
ings and that determination of earnmgs . . . 
was properly made and came under Regulations 
172 and 173 (1 & 8), and therefore tne insur- 
ance officer's decision was correctly made and 
I do not feel the appeal would be allowed. 

From the majority decision of the board 
of referees, the insurance officer appealed to 
the Umpire on August 1. His grounds tor 
appeal, which are contained in a submission 
dated August 31, 1^62, read: 

. . . 8. It is submitted that the majority 
decision of the board of referees is in error. 

9. The evidence shows that this is a pay- 
ment covered by Regulation 172 (1) (b), since 
the payment arises out of the claimant's con- 
tract of employment. This is evident in that 
such payment was made in settlement tor an 
alleged breach of the claimant's contract of 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



71 



employment. The payment is therefore earnings 
unless provided for oy the exceptions listed in 
Regulation 172 (2). 

10. The payment is made by reason of the 
termination ot tne Claimant's contract ot serv- 
ice and tne only applicable exception, if there 
be any, would De m Regulation 172 (2) (f); 
tne words "bonuses, gratuities" do not apply 
smce the evidence is clear mat the employer 
was under obligation to pay to avoid litigation. 

11. The application of the terms "severance 
pay or retirement payments" may require more 
consideration. However, tnese terms are gener- 
ally used to refer to certain specinc payments 
made m accordance witn a labour agreement 
or an establisned practice ot an employer, 
rather man to a payment agreed upon in a 
particular case to efiect settlement ot a griev- 
ance tor alleged wrongful dismissal or for 
alleged breacn of the contract ot service. 

12. On the otner hand, me exception in 
Regulation 172 (2) (f) does not comprise all 
payments made by reason of the termination 
of the claimant's contract ot service. The only 
payments excepted from the definition of earn- 
ings by this subsection are those specifically 
mentioned therein. The intention of the earn- 
ings Regulations in this respect is made evident 
from the fact that provision is made for the 
allocation of other types of termination or 
separation payments by Regulation 173, par- 
ticularly by subsection (4), (5) and (8). With 
respect to subsections (4) and (5), some per- 
tinent types of payments are "wages in lieu of 
notice" and "other monies received at the 
occasion of separation". In subsection (8), 
"retroactive payments of wages or monies m 
lieu of wages awarded to a dismissed employee, 
whether he is reinstated or not," is also a 
pertinent type of payments. 

13. The payment made by the employer to 
the claimant involved m tne present appeal 
would appear to be closely fitting a payment 
of wages or monies in lieu of wages awarded 
to a dismissed employee, as such payment is 
ordinarily made for wrongful dismissal and 
this is precisely the description made by the 
claimant's representative in this case. 

14. It may be contended that the term 
"retroactive" contained in Regulation 173 (8) 
does not apply to the total amount of $5,200, 
smce this amount was paid to cover the claim- 
ant's salary for one year and only part of that 
period was prior to the date of the payment. 
However, this point is not material, since the 
payment would in any case come under the 
description "other monies received at the occa- 
sion of separation" and its allocation would be 
to the same period of time under Regulation 
173 (4). 

15. It is respectfully submitted that the deci- 
sion of the board of referees should be reversed 
and the insurance officer's appeal allowed. 

The claimant requested an oral hearing 
before the Umpire. The hearing was held 
in Toronto on September 28, 1962. 

Considerations and Conclusions: The em- 
ployer stated in his letter dated May 3, 
1962 that the monies "in the amount of 
one full year's salary" which were paid to 
the claimant were in consideration of the 
number of years she had served the com- 
pany and that the said amount, "which was 
not separately broken down, was actually 
in lieu of termination pay, pay in lieu of 
notice, retirement credits or severance pay," 
but not as a bonus or a gratuity. Accord- 



ing to the letter signed by the claimant's 
solicitor and dated May 16, 1962, the 
payment of $5,200, "less various deduc- 
tions," was "as a settlement for her claim 
for wrongful dismissal." Other than that, 
the record contains no information regard- 
ing what the terms of the claimant's con- 
tract of employment and those of the 
effected settlement exactly were. 

On that evidence, the majority members 
of the board of referees, it seems, accepted 
the contention that this was a payment for 
wrongful dismissal which could not be 
considered as earnings and concluded that 
it did not come under subsection (1) or 
(8) of Regulation 173. The dissenting mem- 
ber expressed the opinion that, as there 
was no evidence "as to what the damages" 
for wrongful dismissal were, the "items" 
mentioned in the employer's letter, viz., pay- 
ment in lieu of termination pay, pay in 
lieu of notice, retirement credits and sever- 
ance pay, "should be especially broken 
down" in order to determine "how much 
should be allocated as earnings" and that, 
as this had not been done, "the determina- 
tion of earnings as listed in [the decision 
of the insurance officer] was properly made 
and came under Regulations 172 and 173 
(1) and (8)." 

In my opinion, Regulation 172, as its 
title denotes, is the only provision which 
should be used in order to determine what 
should or should not be considered as 
earnings for benefit purposes. Regulation 
173 provides exclusively for the allocation 
of a claimant's income to specific periods 
or weeks in specific instances, after such 
income has been determined to be earnings 
in accordance with Regulation 172. For 
example, the phrase "retroactive payments 
of wages or monies in lieu of wages awarded 
to a dismissed employee" in subsection (8) 
of Regulation 173 cannot be interpreted 
as meaning that all "retroactive payments, 
etc." are necessarily earnings, but only that 
once a retroactive payment of that kind is 
an income coming under subsection (1), and 
is not excepted by subsection (2), of Regu- 
lation 172, such should be allocated in 
accordance with subsection (8) of Regula- 
tion 173. 

From the foregoing it can be seen that 
all three members of the board of referees 
appear to have been confused as to the real 
issue in the instant case, viz., were the 
monies which were paid to the claimant in 
the nature of an income arising out of her 
services with Limited or of her con- 
tract of employment with that employer, 
and, if so, was such income, in whole or 
in part, one of the kinds enumerated in 
subsection (2) of Regulation 172? 



72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 963 



Regardless of whether, as stated by the 
employer, the monies were paid to the 
claimant in consideration of the number 
of years she had served the company or, 
as stated by the claimant's solicitor, the 
payment was "as a settlement of her claim 
for wrongful dismissal," there can be, in 
my view, no disputing of the fact that the 
monies were in the nature of an income 
arising out of her services or of her con- 
tract of employment and, therefore, were 
earnings within the meaning of subsection 
(1) of Regulation 172. 

The answer to the other part of the 
aforementioned question, namely "Was such 
income in whole or in part one of the 
kinds enumerated in subsection (2) of 
Regulation 172?" is the same as that which, 
according to the evidence in the record, 
must be given to this other question: Has 
the claimant satisfactorily discharged the 
onus of proving that the monies paid to 
her by the employer were in the nature of 
one or more of the exceptions mentioned 
in paragraph (f) of subsection (2) of 
Regulation 172, which reads: 

For the purpose of subsection (1) that 
portion of the income of a claimant that is 
derived from any of the following sources shall 
not be considered as earnings . . . 

(f) bonuses, gratuities, severance pay or 
retirement payments payable at the time of, or 
after, the termination of the claimant's contract 
of service or prior thereto in contemplation of 
the termination . . . 

In that connection, the statement made 
by the employer indicates that the monies 



were paid for a number of specific reasons, 
some of which are expressed in terms iden- 
tical or very similar to those used in the 
above quoted paragraph (f), and if that 
statement was substantiated in detail, it 
might bring the case within the purview 
of that paragraph. However, that statement 
was not substantiated by any definite proof, 
such as perhaps the contract of employment 
itself or the settlement which was made, 
that the monies were, in fact, paid for the 
reasons mentioned therein. Moreover, the 
total amount paid "was not separately 
broken down." Therefore, the employer's 
statement cannot be accepted as satisfactory 
evidence that such monies were in the 
nature of the exceptions mentioned in para- 
graph (f). 

In view of the foregoing, I decide that 
the monies paid to the claimant are earnings 
to be taken into account for the purposes 
of determining, under section 56 of the Act, 
the amount of benefit payable to her. 

Furthermore, as the monies were paid 
to the claimant "in the amount of one full 
year's salary" and were in consideration of 
the number of years she had served the 
company and also as a settlement of a 
claim for wrongful dismissal, they were 
for all practical purposes "monies received 
at the occasion of separation" and shall 
be allocated in accordance with the pro- 
visions of subsection (4) of Regulation 173. 

I consequently decide to allow the insur- 
ance officer's appeal. 



New Farm Safety Regulations, Great Britain 

( Continued from page 66) 

another machine or on the drawbar of 
the machine towed or propelled. He is also 
forbidden to mount or, except in an emer- 
gency, dismount from a self-propelled field 
machine while towing or propelling another 
machine. The employer of the worker is 
also made responsible for the observance 
of these requirements, which are set out in 
Part III of the regulations. 

Part IV imposes on the worker certain 
obligations with respect to the use of safety 
appliances. He must keep in position and 
make full use of all prescribed safety 
devices. A worker of 16 or over may, how- 
ever, remove a guard from a field machine 
which is not in motion in order to clean, 
repair or adjust it. He may also remove 
a guard while the machine or a part of it 
is in motion to make an essential adjust- 
ment that cannot otherwise be made. He 
may temporarily remove a guard from a 



prime mover in order to start it by hand. 
The operator of a field machine is required 
to report immediately to his employer any 
damaged or defective safety device. 

Part V contains requirements applicable 
to employers, workers and other persons. 
It provides that no person may set a self- 
propelled field machine in motion except 
from the driving position or, except in an 
emergency, leave the driving position while 
the machine is in motion. A person other 
than a worker is not to be held liable for 
a contravention of these requirements unless 
his failure to comply would expose a 
worker to risk of injury. 

The regulations provide for the granting 
of certificates of exemption in suitable cases, 
permitting the Minister to exempt particular 
persons or cases from the regulations for 
a specified period and subject to such con- 
ditions as he may impose. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 

-8—6 



73 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN FEDERAL 
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS 



Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during November 
Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During November the Department of Labour prepared 120 wage schedules for 
inclusion in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government 
and its Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, 
remodelling, repair or demolition. In the same period, a total of 96 contracts in these 
categories was awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. t 

In addition, 97 contracts not listed in this report and which contained the General 
Fair Wages Clause were awarded by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Defence 
Construction (1951) Limited, and the Departments of Defence Production, Mines and 
Technical Surveys, Northern Affairs and National Resources, Post Office and Public 
Works. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the 
contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under this heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in November for the manufacture of supplies and equipment 
were as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Defence Production 180 $ 1,756,237.00 

Post Office 12 580,136.25 



The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour 
legislation of the federal Government has 
the purpose of insuring that all Government 
contracts for works of construction and for 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment 
contain provisions to secure the payment of 
wages generally accepted as fair and reason- 
able in each trade or classification employed 
in the district where the work is being per- 
formed. 

The practice of Government, departments 
and those Crown corporations to which the 
legislation applies, before entering into con- 
tracts for any work of construction, re- 
modelling, repair or demolition, is to obtain 
wage schedules from the Department of 
Labour showing the applicable wage deemed 
to be required in the execution of the work. 



These wage schedules are thereupon in- 
cluded with other relevant labour condi- 
tions as terms of such contracts to be 
observed by the contractors. 

Wage schedules are not included in con- 
tracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
equipment because it is not possible to 
determine in advance the classification to 
be employed in the execution of a contract. 
A statement of the labour conditions which 
must be observed in every such contract 
is, however, included therein and is of the 
same nature and effect as those which apply 
in works of construction. 

Copies of the federal Government's Fair 
Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 
may be had upon request to the Industrial 
Relations Branch of the Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 



74 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equipment 
provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) the working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, or if 
there be no such custom, then they shall be fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during November 

During November the sum of $9,580.84 was collected from 15 contractors for 
wage arrears due their employees as a result of the failure of the contractors, or their 
subcontractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required 
by the schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for 
distribution to the 139 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded during November 

Department of Agriculture 

Ste Anne de la Pocatiere Que: Maurice Langlais, repairs to heating system, Science 
Service Laboratory. Brandon Man: R E Turner, installation of laboratory benching, 
Experimental Farm. Theodore Sask: Matheson Bros Ltd, construction of Theodore Dam on 
Whitesand River. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Chalk River Ont: Turnbull Elevator of Canada Ltd, installation of freight elevator, 
2nd north extension, Metallurgy Bldg 465; Lincraft Ltd, installation of laboratory furniture, 
2nd north extension, Metallurgy Bldg 465. Douglas Point Ont: United Steel Corporation 
Ltd, installation of steel stairs, hand rails, plastic grips, etc, for turbine, service & 
administration bldgs; Schreiber Bros Ltd, installation of roofing, insulation & flashing for 
administration bldg, pumphouse, guardhouse, service bldg & ancillaries; Consolidated 
Glass Industries Ltd, fenestration & column cladding, Administration Bldg; Plate & Struc- 
tural Steel Ltd, installation of steel liner for calandria vault; G M Gest Contractors Ltd, 
electrical installation. Whiteshell Man: Malcolm Construction Co Ltd, construction of 
active area shop bldg 412 (Stage II), NRE. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Pierrefonds (Montreal) Que: Miron Co Ltd, asphalt paving & related work for Clover- 
dale Apartments. Weyburn Sask: Home Development Co Ltd, construction of 20 housing 
units (FP3/62). 

In addition, this Corporation awarded 14 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Department of Citizenship and Immigration 

Pointe Bleue Indian Agency Que: Rene Cote, repairs & improvements to pump 
house, Pointe Bleue IR. Stony -Sarcee Indian Agency Alta: Revelstoke Building Materials 
Ltd, construction of two houses, Sarcee IR. 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Blandford N S: Seaport Contractors & Landscape Ltd, construction of access road 
& site clearing, Naval Radio Sation. Cornwallis N S: Rodney Contractors Ltd, exterior 
cladding of various bldgs, HMCS Cornwallis. Dartmouth N S: Trynor Construction 
(Newfoundland) Ltd, repairs to runway 11-29, HMCS Shearwater. Shelburne N S: Rodney 
Contractors Ltd, construction of five housing units. La Macaza Que: Malach Roofing & 
Flooring Ltd, construction & installation of 114 storage units for carports, RCAF Station. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 75 

63569-8— 6£ 



Gloucester Ont: L Zuccarini Ltd, construction of water treatment plant. Cold Lake Altai 
Mix Bros Construction Co Ltd, construction of roads, site grading & services for 200 
married quarters, RCAF Station. One contract was awarded in the restricted category. 

Building and Maintenance 

Goose Bay (Labr) Nfld: J W Lindsay Construction Co Ltd, runway & parking apron 
repairs, RCAF Station. St Jean Que: Fiber-Plast Co Ltd, application of plastic laminate 
finish in shower rooms of three barrack blocks at CMR. 

In addition, Defence Construction (1951) Ltd awarded one contract containing 
the General Fair Wages Clause. 

Department of Defence Production 

Bedford N S: Construction Equipment Co Ltd, replacement of structural steel boat 
landing, north jetty magazines. Lancaster Park Alta: O K Construction Ltd, paving access 
road to fire hall, RCAF Station "Namao". Comox B C: Richards-Wilcox Canadian Co 
Ltd, modification of rail & installation of rolltite steel door, RCAF Station. 

In addition, this Department awarded 33 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Department of Mines and Technical Surveys 

This Department awarded four contracts containing the General Fair Wages Clause. 

National Harbours Board 

Halifax N S: Steen Mechanical Contractors Ltd, installation of heating system in 
sheds 20 & 21, Ocean Terminals. Montreal Que: Hiland Ltd, construction of offices at 
Grain Elevator No 3; Cambrian Construction Ltd, construction of transit shed at Section 
51. Vancouver B C: Hydraulic Service & Equipment Co Ltd, replacement of car haul 
machinery, Elevator No 2. 

Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources 

Fundy National Park N B: Dexter Construction Co Ltd, repairs to roads & highway. 
Point Pelee National Park Ont: Rante Enterprises (Amherstburg) Ltd, construction of 
substructure of boardwalk in marshland. 

In addition, this Department awarded three contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Post Office Department 

This Department awarded three contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

Department of Public Works 

Glovertown South Nfld: Louis Briffett & Sons Ltd, wharf repairs. Western Bay 
Nfld: Gordon Burden, repairs & renovations to postal accommodation. Charlottetown 
P E I: Robert J Petrie, construction of workshop for Department of Fisheries. Sydney N S: 
T C Gorman (Nova Scotia) Ltd, repairs to main jetty at Point Edward Naval Base. 
Westport N S: E K Potter Ltd, sheathing wharf. Gaspe (Sandy Beach) Que: Eloie Boulay, 
construction of shed. Lauzon Que: Geo T Davie & Sons Ltd, repairs to coal hopper & 
chute, Lome Dry Dock. L'Epiphanie Que: Prieur Entreprises Inc, construction of federal 
bldg. Mansonville Que: Frank Klopfer, construction of post office. Notre Dame du Nord 
Que: Drolet & Ringuette Ltee, construction of federal bldg. Riviere au Tonnerre Que: 
Dimock & Albert, wharf reconstruction. Rollett Que: Charest Construction, reconstruction 
of wharf. Sept-Iles Que: Lionel Lebel, wharf repairs. Etobicoke Ont: Woodings Cleaning 
Service, cleaning interior of Post Office. Ottawa Ont: Corrigan Electric, supply & installa- 
tion of emergency lighting systems in Veterans Memorial Bldg, Trade & Commerce Bldg, 
Wellington St, & Surveys & Mapping Bldg, Booth St; Federal Plumbing & Heating, supply 
& installation of natural gas system throughout Royal Canadian Mint, 320 Sussex Drive. 
Ashern Man: Dauphin Fixtures Ltd, construction of post office. Fort Garry (Winnipeg) 
Man: Modern Building Cleaning Service of Canada Ltd, interior cleaning, letter carrier 
depot. Somerset Man: Du Pasquier & Pele Construction, construction of post office. Birch 
Hills Sask: H J Tubby & Son, construction of post office. Glaslyn Sask: H P Friedrich, 
construction of post office. Hague Sask: Shoquist Construction Ltd, construction of post 
office. Lafleche Sask: Knutson Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office. Lestock 

76 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



Sask: Logan Stevens Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Maryfield Sask: Neufield 
& Klassen Builders Ltd, construction of post office. Neudorf Sask: C M Miners Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of post office. Northgate Sask: Swertz Bros Construction Ltd, con- 
struction of Customs highway office. Star City Sask: C M Miners Construction Co Ltd, 
construction of post office. Sturgis Sask: Wm Slowski, construction of post office. Wakaw 
Sask: Shoquist Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Young Sask: C W Hill 
Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Bashaw Aha: R Holzer Construction, con- 
struction of post office. Bent ley Aha: R Holzer Construction, construction of post office. 
Coutts Alta: Getkate Masonry Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Edgerton Alta: 
R Holzer Construction, construction of post office. Irma Alta: R Holzer Construction, 
construction of post office. Deep Cove B C: Victoria Pile Driving Co Ltd, approach 
renewal. Kelsey Bay B C: Gagne & Son Construction Ltd, fender pile repairs. Port 
Alberni B C: McLellan Contracting Co Ltd, assembly wharf repairs. Fort Neville B C: 
Greenlees Piledriving Co Ltd, float renewal. 

In addition, this Department awarded 39 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 

Beauharnois Que: Planned Renovators Ltd, partial painting of Beauharnois Tunnel. 
Lachine Que: Charles Duranceau Ltd, asphalt patching, Lachine Canal. St Lambert & 
Ste Catherine Que: Charles Duranceau Ltd, asphalt patching at Locks. 

Department of Transport 

Cape Norman Nfld: Twillingate Engineering & Construction Co Ltd, construction 
of lighthouse tower, fog alarm bldg & landing storage shed & demolition of existing 
bldgs. Candlebox Island N S: Wallace D'Eon & Bernard D'Eon, construction of double 
dwelling & combined fog alarm bldg & light tower, demolition of existing bldg. Halifax 
N S: Kenney Construction Co Ltd, enlargement of heating plant facilities & installation 
of additional oil-fired boiler, International Airport. Fredericton N B: Weyman Construc- 
tion Co Ltd, modification to VOR Bldg for installation of TACAN. Saint John N B: 
W G Usher Co Ltd, construction of non-directional beacon & back beam marker, 
runway 05, bldg & services. Dorval Que: Sestock Construction Ltd, construction of fire 
hall bldg & related work, Montreal Airport. Fox River Que: Adelard Cotton, modifications 
to Coast Station Bldg & site development. Montreal Que: The Highway Paving Co Ltd, 
resurfacing hydrant operating plant, International Airport. London Ont: Harrison & Green 
Construction Ltd, construction of water supply pumphouse, Airport. Malton Ont: J M 
Fuller Ltd, construction of ILS, runway 05R, Toronto International Airport. Toronto Ont: 
Universal Electric, Division of Univex Electrical Construction & Engineering Ltd, installa- 
tion of power supply to control tower & instrument landing system, International Airport. 
Donavon Sask: Peter Boorberg Enterprises Ltd, installation of power supply. Lumsden 
Sask: Peter Boorberg Enterprises Ltd, installation of power supply. Saskatoon Sask: Jim 
Patrick Ltd, prefabrication, supply & installation of back beam marker bldg & related 
work. Yorkton Sask: Peter Boorberg Enterprises Ltd, installation of power supply. Calgary 
Alta: McCormick Electric Ltd, construction of localizer bldg, runway 34 & related work, 
Municipal Airport. Edmonton Alta: McCormick Electric Ltd, installation of fire alarm 
system, International Airport; D L Guthrie Construction, supply, precut & partial prefabri- 
cation of antenna tuning houses & related work. Kamloops B C: Cooper & Gibbard Electric 
Ltd, installation of lights on runway 08-26 & related taxiways. 



H.D. Woods Again Director of McGill Industrial Relations Centre 

Prof. H. D. Woods has been re-appointed Director of McGill University's Industrial 
Relations Centre, and Mrs. Frances Bairstow has been named Assistant Director. 

Prof. Woods founded the Centre some 14 years ago, and resigned as Director in 
1960 to accept a Ford Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship for the year 1960-61, 
under which he undertook a study of Canadian labour relations policy. 

Prof. Edward C. Webster served as Director of the Centre and as Chairman of 
McGill's annual industrial relations conferences in the period between Prof. Woods' 
resignation and re-appointment. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 77 



PRICES AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Consumer Price Index, December 1962 

The consumer price index (1949=100) 
was unchanged at 131.9 between November 
and December. The December index was 
1.6 per cent above the index of 129.8 a 
year earlier.* 

For the year 1962, the index averaged 
130.7, which was 1.2 per cent above the 
1961 annual index of 129.2. 

During the month, fractional increases 
in the food and housing indexes balanced 
declines in the clothing and transportation 
indexes. The three remaining component 
indexes were unchanged. 

The food index increased 0.1 per cent 
from 127.7 to 127.8. Prices were higher 
for bread and most cereals, sugar, apples 
and most fresh vegetables, particularly 
tomatoes. Beef and pork prices receded 
further from their October peaks. Prices 
were lower also for eggs, citrus fruits, 
bananas and orange juice. 

The housing index rose 0.1 per cent 
from 135.6 to 135.7 as both the shelter 
and household operation components moved 
upward. In shelter, the rent index was 
unchanged but the home-ownership index 
was higher. In household operation, higher 
prices for furniture, textiles, utensils and 
equipment outweighed lower prices for floor 
coverings. 

The clothing index declined 0.2 per cent 
from 116.0 to 115.8. Lower prices for 
women's and children's wear, particularly 
winter cloth coats, offset increases for 
men's wear, footwear, piece goods and 
clothing services, including laundry, dry 
cleaning and shoe repairs. 

The transportation index declined 0.3 
per cent from 140.6 to 140.2 as a result 
of further price declines for gasoline. These 
latest decreases brought the price of gaso- 
line to its lowest level since 1949. Some 
price increases occurred for automobile 
tires. 

The health and personal care, recreation 
and reading, and tobacco and alcohol in- 
dexes all remained at their November levels 
of 159.8, 148.2 and 117.8 respectively. 

City Consumer Price Indexes, November 1962 

Consumer price indexes (1949=100) 
between October and November rose in 
eight of the ten regional cities and remained 

* See Table F-l, page 100. 



unchanged in the other two.* Increases 
ranged from 0.1 per cent to 0.5 per cent. 

Food indexes rose in seven cities, fell 
in one, and held firm in two; increases 
ranged from 0.2 per cent in three cities to 
1.3 per cent in Montreal. The housing 
indexes were higher in five cities and un- 
changed in five. Of the clothing indexes, 
seven were up, one down, and two un- 
changed. Nine of the indexes for transporta- 
tion rose while the other fell. In the health 
and personal care group there were two 
higher indexes, five lower, and three un- 
changed. The recreation and reading index 
rose in all ten cities. The tobacco and 
alcohol index was unchanged in six cities 
but fell in the other four. 

Percentage changes in regional consumer 
price indexes between October and Novem- 
ber were: Montreal -f0.5 per cent, Ottawa 
+0.5, Winnipeg +0.5, Edmonton-Calgary 
+ 0.4, Vancouver +0.3, Halifax +0.1, 
Toronto +0.1, Saskatoon-Regina +0.1. 
The indexes for St. John's and Saint John 
were unchanged. 

Point changes in regional consumer price 
indexes between October and November 
were: Montreal +0.7 to 132.0; Ottawa 
+0.6 to 132.7; Winnipeg +0.6 to 130.1; 
Edmonton-Calgary +0.5 to 127.4; Van- 
couver + 0.4 to 130.6; Halifax +0.1 to 
130.9; Toronto +0.1 to 133.2; Saskatoon- 
Regina +0.1 to 128.0. St. John's and Saint 
John remained unchanged at 118.lt and 
131.4 respectively. 

Wholesale Price Index, November 1962 

The general wholesale index (1935-39= 
100) rose 0.3 per cent in November to 
242.3 from 241.6 in October and was 3.0 
per cent higher than the November 1961 
index of 235.3. Four major group indexes 
were higher, three declined, and the remain- 
ing one, the chemical products group index, 
was unchanged at 190.1. 

The vegetable products group index rose 
1.5 per cent to 213.3 from 210.1, and the 
textile products group index increased 0.4 
per cent to 244.1 from 243.2. Advances 
of 0.2 per cent or less occurred in two 
major group indexes, non-ferrous metal 
products to 194.7 from 194.4, and wood 
products to 319.1 from 319.0. 

*See Table F-2, page 100. 
t On base June 1951=100. 



78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



The non-metallic minerals products group 
index dropped 0.6 per cent to 189.5 from 
190.6, the iron products group index moved 
down 0.3 per cent to 255.0 from 255.7, 
and the animal products group index de- 
clined negligibly to 268.8 from 269.4. 

The residential building material price 
index (1935-39=100) edged up from 296.1 
to 296.2 between October and November. 
On the base 1949=100 it was unchanged 
at 129.9. 

The non-residential building material price 
index (1949=100) moved up from 132.1 
to 132.4. 

The index of Canadian farm product 
prices at terminal markets (1935 = 39) 
advanced 1.2 per cent, from 230.4 to 233.2, 
in the three-week period ended November 
23. 

U.S. Consumer Price Index, November 1962 

The United States consumer price index 
(1957-59=100) was unchanged at 106.0 in 



November. During a year of relative price 
stability, the rise in living costs has totalled 
1.3 per cent. 

Biggest factors in the 12-month increase 
were a 6.2-per-cent rise in used car prices, 
a 3.1-per-cent jump in the cost of medical 
care and a 2.2-per-cent rise in food prices. 

British Index of Retail Prices, October 1962 

The British index of retail prices dropped 
again — the fourth successive monthly de- 
cline — between mid-September and mid- 
October. On the base Jan. 16, 1962=100, it 
declined slightly from 101.5 to 101.4; on 
the base Jan. 17, 1956=100, it moved 
down from 119.3 to 119.1. 

Although the "services" group index 
increased, as a result of higher movie 
admissions and charges for hairdressing, 
shoe repairs, laundering and dry cleaning, 
the rise was not large enough to change 
the total index. 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not for 
sale by the Department of Labour. Persons 
wishing to purchase them should communi- 
cate with the publishers. Publications listed 
may be borrowed by making application 
to the Librarian, Department of Labour, 
Ottawa. Students must apply through the 
library of their institution. Applications for 
loans should give the number (numeral) 
of the publication desired . and the month 
in which it was listed in the Labour 
Gazette. L i st No. 171 

Annual Reports 

1. Canada. National Employment Serv- 
ice. Executive and Professional Section. 
Supply and Demand, University Graduates, 
1962-63. Ottawa, 1962. Pp. 34. 

Prepared for undergraduate, graduating and 
graduate students at Canadian universities and 
colleges and contains information concerning 
starting salaries and trends in many different 
fields. 

2. Great Britain. Central Statistical 
Office. National Income and Expenditure, 
1962. London, HMSO, 1962. Pp. 90. 

3. Great Britain. Factory Inspector- 
ate. Annual Report of the Chief Inspector 
of Factories on Industrial Health, 1961. 
London, HMSO, 1962. Pp. 63. 



Business— Small Business 

4. U.S. Small Business Administration. 
Small Marketers Aids: Annual No. 4. Edited 
by Robert A. Litzberg. Washington, 1962. 
Pp. 90. 

The topics covered in this volume are selling, 
cost control, personnel management, external 
management assistance, human relations, admin- 
istrative practices, competitive strategy, and 
business-government relations. 

5. Tower, Ralph Burnett. A Handbook 
of Small Business Finance. 6th ed. Revised 
by Staff Members of the Small Business 
Administration. Washington, U.S. Small 
Business Administration, 1962. Pp. 81. 

Contents: Financial Statements. Financial 
Management. Ratio and Turnover Rates. Bank- 
ing Relationships. Term Loans, Accounts Re- 
ceivable, and Inventory Financing. Some Other 
Sources of Financial Assistance for Small 
Manufacturers. The Cash Budget. The Small 
Business Administration's Lending Program. 
The Small Business Administration's Invest- 
ment Program. 

Cambridge Economic Handbooks 

The following seven handbooks were 
published in Chicago by the University of 
Chicago Press in 1962. 

6. Bauer, Peter Tamas. The Economics 
of Under-developed Countries, by Peter T. 
Bauer and Basil S. Yamey. Pp. 271. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



Some of the topics discussed in this book 
are national income and capital, labour and 
its distribution, natural resources, population, 
unemployment and underemployment, remuner- 
ation, capital and economic development. The 
second part of the book deals with government 
and economic development. 

7. Harrod, Roy Forbes. International 
Economics. 4th ed. Pp. 186. 

Partial Contents: The Gain from Foreign 
Trade. Potential and Actual Gain. Compara- 
tive Price Levels. Foreign Exchange. The 
Balance of Trade. Correcting an Imbalance. 

8. Henderson, Sir Hubert Douglas. 
Supply and Demand. Pp. 142. 

Contents: The Economic World. The General 
Laws of Supply and Demand. Utility and the 
Margin of Consumption. Cost and the Margin 
of Production. Joint Demand and Supply. Land. 
Risk-bearing and Enterprise. Capital. Labour. 
The Real Costs of Production. 

9. Matthews, Robert Charles Oliver. 
The Business Cycle. Pp. 300. 

Partial Contents: Some Formal Models of 
the Cycle. Investment: (1) The Acceleration 
Principle and its Generalization. Investment: 
(2) Replacement, Technical Progress, and Other 
Influences. Inventory Investment. Investment in 
House-Building. Consumption. Money and Fin- 
ance. The Ceiling. Periodicity and the Problem 
of Major and Minor Cycles. The Trend and 
the Cycle. Policy for the Control of the Cycle. 

10. Rees, Albert. The Economics of 
Trade Unions. Pp. 208. 

Discusses the impact of trade unions on 
wage structure, prices, employment, produc- 
tivity, and the distribution of income. 

11. Robertson, Sir Dennis Holme. 
Money. 4th ed. Pp. 187. 

Partial Contents: The Merits and Drawbacks 
of Money. The Value of Money. The Quantity 
of Money. The Gold Standard. Money and 
Saving. The Question of the Standard. The 
Question of the Cycle. 

12. Robinson, Edward Austin Gossage. 
The Structure of Competitive Industry. Rev. 
ed. Pp. 156. 

Examines "the forces which determine the 
size and structure of firms, and those further 
forces which determine the minimum efficient 
scale of an industry." 

Education, Vocational 

The following four books were issued by 
the federal Department of Labour in 
Ottawa and were published by the Queen's 
Printer between 1958 and 1960. Analyses 
prepared by a national committee appointed 
by the Department of Labour. 

13. An Analysis of the Electrical Trade, 
Construction. Pp. 94. 

14. An Analysis of the Radio and Tele- 
vision Service Trade. Pp. 131. 

15. An Analysis of the Steamfitting 
Trade, Construction. Pp. 37. 

16. An Analysis of the Welding Trade. 
Pp. 43. 



European Economic Community 

17. European Economic Community. 
Commission. Expose sur revolution de la 
situation sociale dans la Communaute en 
1960. [Bruxelles?] 1961. Pp. 344. 

18. Great Britain. Treasury. Informa- 
tion Division. Britain and the European 
Communities; Background to the Negotia- 
tions. Prepared by the Information Division 
of the Treasury and the Central Office of 
Information. London, HMSO, 1962. Pp. 48. 

". . . This booklet presents an analysis of 
the structure and aims of the Communities, 
the economies of Western Europe as a whole, 
and the character of its trade, with special 
reference to the trade of Britain and the rest 
of the Commonwealth with these countries." 

Industrial Relations 

19. Industrial Relations Research 
Association. Proceedings of the Fourteenth 
Annual Meeting, New York City, Decem- 
ber 28 and 29, 1961. Edited by Gerald G. 
Somers. Madison, Wis., 1962. Pp. 437. 

Some of the topics discussed at this meeting 
were unemployment, work rules, union govern- 
ment, the role of labour history, wage deter- 
mination, management practices, and labour 
force analysis. 

20. Industrial Relations Research 
Association. Public Policy and Collective 
Bargaining. Editors: Joseph Shister [and 
others] New York, Harper, cl962. Pp. 248. 

Partial Contents: The Obligation to Bargain 
in Good Faith, by Robben W. Fleming. The 
Union Security Issue, by Paul E. Sultan. The 
Weapons of Conflict: Picketing and Boycotts, 
by Donald H. Wollett. Collective Bargaining 
and the Antitrust Laws, by George H. Hilde- 
br-md. Legal Regulation of International Union 
Affairs, by Joseph R. Grodin. United States 
and Canadian Experience: a Comparison, by 
Harry D. Woods. 

21. McGill University, Montreal. In- 
dustrial Relations Centre. Research 
Frontiers in Industrial Relations Today. 
[Fourteenth Annual Conference, April 26 
and 27, 1962] Frances Bairstow, ed. Mont- 
real, 1962. Pp. 125. 

Contents: Research in the Labour Field — 
New Approaches and Needs, by George V. 
Haythorne. Human Relations Research in In- 
dustry: Some Things Learned, by Victor H. 
Vroom. The Future of Personnel Administra- 
tion, by Charles A. Myers. The New Look in 
Industrial Relations Research: Organizational 
Behaviour, by Leonard R. Sayles. An Appraisal 
of the Frontiers of Research in Industrial Rela- 
tions, by Sar A. Levitan. 

22. Primer of Labor Relations. 12th ed. 
Washington, Bureau of National Affairs, 
1961. Pp. 91. 

Contents: The Law of Labor Relations: a 
Bird's Eye View. Who is Covered by the Law. 
Employees' Organizing Rights. Choosing a 
Bargaining Agent. The Duty to Bargain. Lawful 
and Unlawful Union-Security Clauses. Strikes, 
Picketing, and Boycotts. Settlement of Disputes 
Regulations of Unions. How to Use the Taft- 
Hartley Act. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



23. U.S. President's Advisory Commit- 
tee on Labor-Management Policy. The 
Benefits and Problems incident to Automa- 
tion and Other Technological Advances; 
Report. Washington, G.P.O., 1962. Pp. 11. 

Arthur J. Goldberg, Secretary of Labor, 
chairman. 

Contains 11 recommendations for encourag- 
ing automation and technological changes with- 
out "serious social consequences growing out 
of the displacement of workers." Includes dis- 
senting comments by Arthur F. Burns, president 
of the National Bureau of Economic Research 
and Henry Ford II, chairman of the board of 
directors of the Ford Motor Company. 

Labour Organization 

24. Flagler, John J. Building the Local 
Union Education Program. Iowa City, 
Bureau of Labor and Management, Col- 
lege of Business Administration, State Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1961. Pp. 28. 

Briefly describes such things as defining the 
job of the education committee, organizing 
materials, staffing programs, recruiting partici- 
pants, and planning for improvement. 

25. French, Doris Cavell (Martin). 
Faith, Sweat and Politics; the Early Trade 
Union Years in Canada. Toronto, McClel- 
land and Stewart, cl962. Pp. 154. 

Although this is an account of the early trade 
union movement in Canada, much of the book 
tells the story of Daniel John O'Donoghue 
(1844-1907) who was prominent in the labour 
movement in the Trades and Labor Congress 
of Canada and finally served as fair wages 
officer in the federal Department of Labour in 
Ottawa. 

26. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Canadian Office. The Fourth 
Canadian Labour Congress Convention, 
Vancouver, B.C., April 9-13, 1962; a Report 
and Some Observations, by Allan A. Porter. 
Montreal, 1962. Pp. 25. 

27. Roberts, Bryn. The Price of TUC 
Leadership. London, Allen & Unwin [1961] 
Pp. 146. 

The author is General Secretary of the 
National Union of Public Employees. He 
criticizes the present leadership of the Trades 
Union Congress for not giving proper guidance 
to the members of the TUC, and alleges it was 
responsible for the defeat of the Labour Party 
in the 1959 General Election. 

Labouring Classes 

28. Aleksandrov, Nikolai Grigor'evich. 
Soviet Labour Law in English. 1961 ed. 
Translated by Inder K. Nayar. Delhi, Uni- 
versity Book House [1961?] Pp. 454. 

Intended to serve as a textbook on Russian 
labour legislation. 

29. Editorial Research Reports. Shorter 
Hours of Work, by Richard L. Worsnop. 
Washington, 1962. Pp. 419-435. 

Describes organized labour's efforts to shorten 
the standard 40-hour work week. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 

63569-8—7 



30. International Labour Conference. 
40th, Geneva, 1957. Labour. Convention 
concerning the Abolition of Forced Labour, 
done at Geneva, June 25, 1957; Instrument 
of Ratification deposited July 14, 1959, in 
Force for Canada, July 14, 1960. Ottawa, 
Queen's Printer, 1961. Pp. 7. English and 
French on opposite pages. 

31. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
Housing for Migrant Agricultural Workers; 
Labor Camp Standards. Washington, GPO, 
1961 [i.e. 1962] Pp. 105. 

32. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
Workmen's Compensation Coverage of Pub- 
lic Employees. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 

43. 

". . . Analyzes the workmen's compensation 
laws as they relate to the coverage of public 
employees in the various States, and shows the 
extent to which such coverage is compulsory 
under the laws or is dependent upon the action 
of the governmental unit . . . Also explores 
briefly the historical background of the applica- 
tion of workmen's compensation laws to public 
employees, and discusses recent trends." 

Management 

33. Dalhousie University, Halifax. In- 
stitute of Public Affairs. Bureau of 
Industrial Relations. The Science of 
Management and the Art of Leadership; a 
Summary of Proceedings of an Eighth One- 
Day Conference . . . held at Dalhousie 
University on May 31, 1961 . . . Halifax, 
1962. Pp. 15. 

Contains two addresses by Lyndall F. Urwick, 
and the questions and answers following the 
talks, and a reprint of an article, The Content 
of Management, by Col. Urwick. 

34. Harvard Business Review. How 
Successful Executives handle People; 12 
Studies on Communications and Manage- 
ment Skills. [Boston? n.d., I960?] Pp. 114. 

Partial Contents: The Manager's Span of 
Control, by Lyndall F. Urwick. Listening to 
People, by Ralph G. Nichols and Leonard 
Stevens. Communications for Executives, by 
Rex F. Harlow. What Employees Want from 
Their Work, by Robert Saltonstall. Organiza- 
tional Effectiveness under Stress, by Chris 
Argyris. Making Human Relations work, by 
Elizabeth and Francis Jennings. Foremen: Key 
to Worker Morale, by Arthur N. Turner. 

Occupations 

35. Dale, J. Rodney. The Clerk in In- 
dustry; a Survey of the Occupational Ex- 
perience, Status, Education, and Vocational 
Training of a Group of Male Clerks em- 
ployed by Industrial Companies. Liverpool, 
Liverpool University Press, 1962. Pp. 118. 

This study is based on a survey of 208 male 
clerks employed by five companies. Provides 
information about their occupational history, 
status, education and vocational training, and 
examines the possible effect of technical change 
on office workers in industry. 



81 



36. Organization for Economic Co- 
operation and Development. Job Descrip- 
tion in the European Hotel Industry, a 
Comparative Study, by Leone Filippi. Les 
emplois dans I'hdtellerie europeenne, etude 
comparative des qualifications et des tdches. 
Paris, 1962. Pp. 136. Text in French and 
English. 

37. Your Career Opportunities in En- 
gineering. With an introd. by Hilliard W. 
Paige. New York, Rowman and Littlefield, 
1962. Pp. 60. 

Presents information on many aspects of 
the engineering profession. Includes a list of 
accredited American institutions offering instruc- 
tion, as well as a selected list of reading 
material on the subject. 

38. Your Career Opportunities in Print- 
ing, including Offset Lithography. With an 
introd. by William H. Walling. New York, 
Rowman and Littlefield, 1962. Pp. 64. 

Explains many aspects of the printing pro- 
fession. Includes a list of institutions offering 
accredited instruction, and a list of reading 
material on this subject. 

Women 

39. National Conference of Labour 
Women. 39th, Blackpool, Eng., 1962. 
Report. London, 1962. Pp. 55. Conference 
held May 29, 30 and 31, 1962. 

40. U.S. Women's Bureau. Fifteen Years 
after College; a Study of Alumnce of the 
Class of 1945. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 26. 

Based on a questionnaire completed by 580 
women graduates from four liberal arts col- 
leges. Women graduates were questioned about 
their marital and family status, education, 
volunteer activities, their employment in pro- 
fessional, administrative, clerical, or other posi- 
tions, and their future training plans. 

Miscellaneous 

41. Canadian Tax Foundation. The Bur- 
den of Canadian Taxation; Allocation of 
Federal, Provincial and Local Taxes among 
Income Classes, by Irving Jay Goffman. 
Toronto, 1962. Pp. 73. 

Contents: The Nature, Scope and Limitations 
of the Analysis. The Estimated Burden of 
Canadian Taxation. The Statistical Bases of 
the Estimates. The Incidence of Federal Taxes. 
The incidence of Provincial and Local Taxes. 

42. Dyck, Diedrich. A Socio-economic 
Study of Rural Areas of Prince Edward 
Island, 1959. A co-operative study by the 
Canada and Prince Edward Island Depart- 
ments of Agriculture, July 1961. [Ottawa? 
Canada Dept. of Agriculture?] 1961. Pp. 
107. 

43. Little (Arthur D.) Inc., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. The Future of Steel-making 
in Sydney; Report to Government of Nova 
Scotia. Cambridge, Mass., 1960. Pp. 93. 



"The purpose of this study is to provide the 
Government of Nova Scotia with an analysis 
of the future of the steel industry in Sydney." 

44. McKinnon, Ronald Ian. The Em- 
ployment of Labor and the Cost of Capital 
in Manufacturing Industries as they are 
related to Wage Changes and Technological 
Progress. Ann Arbor, University Microfilms, 
1962. Pp. 60. Reprint of microfilm copy. 

45. National Education Association 
of the United States. National Commis- 
sion on Teacher Education and Profes- 
sional Standards. New Horizons for the 
Teaching Profession; a Report of the Task 
Force on New Horizons in Teacher Educa- 
tion and Professional Standards. Edited by 
Margaret Lindsey. Washington, 1961. Pp. 
243. 

Partial Contents: The Teaching Profession, 

1961. Responsibilities of the Teaching Profession 
in the Sixties. Preparation of Professional Per- 
sonnel. Accreditation of Professional Prepara- 
tory Programs. A License to Teach. Identifica- 
tion, Selective Admission and Retention in 
Teacher Education. The Advancement of Stand- 
ards: Policies and Procedures. 

46. United Nations. Secretariat. Pe- 
troleum Exploration; Capital Requirements 
and Methods of Financing. New York, 

1962. Pp. 29. 

47. United Nations. Secretary-Gen- 
eral, 1961- (Thant). The United 

Nations Development Decade; Proposals 
for Action. New York, United Nations, 
1962. Pp. 125. 

Partial Contents: Mobilization of Human 
Resources. Sectoral Development. International 
Trade. Development Financing. Technical Co- 
operation and Other Aids to Development and 
Planning. 

48. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
The Relationship between Imports and Em- 
ployment; an Analysis of 27 Import-Com- 
peting Industries, and 2 Industry Case 
Studies. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 143. 

Describes the impact of foreign trade on 
domestic employment, with special reference to 
the china and earthenware table and kitchen- 
ware and the wallpaper industries. 

49. U.S. Children's Bureau. Licensed 
Day Care Facilities for Children; Report of 
a National Survey of Departments of State 
Governments responsible for licensing Day 
Care Facilities, by Seth Low. Washington, 
GPO, 1962. Pp. 29. 

50. U.S. Department of Health, Edu- 
cation, and Welfare. Special Staff on 
Aging. Hodson Day Center; a Community 
Center Program for Older Persons in a 
Public Agency, by Virginia O'Neill. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 41. 

Tells something about a day centre which 
provides recreational, educational, and social 
activity for older people. 



82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-l to A-3— Labour Force 83 

Table B-l — Labour Income 85 

Tables C-l to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 86 

Tables D-l to D-5— Employment Service Statistics 92 

Tables E-l to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 97 

Tables F-l and F-2— Prices 100 

Tables G-l to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 101 

Tables H-l and H-2— Industrial Fatalities 104 



A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-l— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 15, 1962 

(estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



— 


Canada 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Region 


British 
Columbia 


The Labour Force 


6,574 


603 


1,840 


2,409 


1,123 


599 




4,778 
1,796 

592 

831 

2,985 

1,961 

205 


448 
155 

67 

89 

254 

176 

17 


1,362 

478 

189 
275 
844 
487 
45 


1,714 
695 

189 

267 

1,110 

755 

88 


816 
307 

102 
136 
500 
349 
36 


438 




161 




45 


20-24 years 


64 




277 




194 


65 years and over 


19 


Employed 


6,160 


533 


1,686 


2,316 


1,072 


553 




4,420 
1,740 


383 
150 


1,227 
459 


1,638 
678 


771 
301 


401 


Women 


152 


Agriculture 


582 
5,578 


32 
501 


114 
1,572 


157 
2,159 


260 
812 


19 


Non-agriculture 


534 


Paid Workers 


5,100 

3,513 
1,587 


452 

314 

138 


1,424 

1,004 
420 


1,995 

1,367 
628 


750 

488 
262 


479 


Men 

Women 


340 
139 




414 


70 


154 


93 


51 


46 




358 
56 

5,752 


65 

* 

644 


135 
19 

1,697 


76 
17 

1,893 


45 

* 

979 


37 




* 


Persons not in the Labour Force 


539 


Men 


1,347 
4,405 


173 
471 


382 
1,315 


407 
1,486 


248 
731 


137 




402 






♦Less than 10,000. 














THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANl 


IARY 7963 










83 


63569-8— 7i 















TABLE A-2— AGE, SEX AND MARITAL STATUS, WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 15, 1962 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 





Total 


14-19 
years 

all 
persons 




20-64 


years 




65 years 




Men 


Women 


and over 
aU 




Married 


Other 


Married 


Other 


persons 


Population 14 years of age and over* 1 ) 


12,326 

6,574 

6,160 

414 

.. 5,752 


1,854 

592 

520 

72 

1,262 

31.9 
32.6 

12.2 
11.5 


3,565 

3,438 

3,242 

196 

127 

96.4 
96.6 

5.7 

4.1 


987 

843 
742 
101 

144 

85.4 
85.7 

12.0 
9.9 


3,678 

860 

843 

17 

2,818 

23.4 
23.7 

2.0 
2.4 


914 

636 

617 

19 

278 

69.6 
70.3 

3.0 
3.0 


1,328 
205 




196 








1,123 


Participation rate* 2 * 

1962 December 15 


53.3 
53.7 

6.3 
5.2 


15.4 




15.9 


Unemployment rate (3) 

1962 December 15 


• 




• 







^Excludes inmates of institutions, members of the armed services, Indians living on reserves and residents of the 
Yukon and Northwest Territories. 

( 2 )The labour force as a percentage of the population 14 years of age and over. 
< 3 )The unemployed as a percentage of the labour force. 
*Less than 10,000 unemployed. 



TABLE A-3— UNEMPLOYED, WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 15, 1962 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



December 
1962 



November 
1962 



December 
1961 



Total unemployed 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work. . . 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1-3 months 

Seeking 4-6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months. . 



414 

27 

387 

366 

21 

127 

165 

51 

44 



342 

18 

324 

305 

19 

117 

125 

39 

43 



413 
23 
390 
369 
21 
127 
155 
50 
58 



84 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



B — Labour Income 
TABLE B-l— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

Note: Monthly and quarterly figures may not add to annual totals because of rounding. 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals* 1 ) 


Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Com muni- 
cat ion < 2 > 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 


Totals 


1957— Total.... 
1958— Total.... 
1959— Total.... 
1960— Total.... 
1961— Total. . . . 

1961— 


535 
527 
552 
551 
545 

46.3 

46.2 
45.5 

45.8 
45.2 
45.6 
45.1 
47.0 
48.2 
48.7 
48.3 
47.6 
47.0 


4,838 
4,823 
5,096 
5,188 
5,348 

463.0 
458.8 
451.3 

450.7 
455.9 
461.1 
469.0 
481.7 
492.1 
485.0 
490.6 
498.4 
493.0 


1,661 
1,685 

1,785 
1,806 
1,862 

159.0 
158.1 
152.0 

151.2 
152.1 
150.3 
153.8 
160.1 
161.6 
165.7 
166.9 
164.3 
165.4 


336 
270 

288 
326 

285 


1,311 

1,317 
1,279 
1,245 
1,225 


277 
307 
332 
344 
356 


2,265 
2,360 
2,528 
2,638 
2,737 


3,920 
4,303 
4,653 
5,019 
5,475 


683 
727 
746 
790 
827 


16,018 
16,521 
17,463 
18,119 
18,884 

1,644.9 


November... 


85.1 


311.5 


89.9 


712.2 


1,413.5 


211.9 


1,625.1 
1,585.8 


1962— 














1,565.7 


February .... 


68.2 


255.6 


89.7 


687.7 


1,421.5 


212.0 


1,575.7 
1,590.5 
















1,618.8 




65.7 


333.2 


93.3 


718.1 


1,475.0 


218.1 


1,677.1 




1,726.2 


July 














1,711.5 


August 


85.8 


397.8 


98.3 


726.1 


1,456.1 


222.2 


1,725.1 
1,749.2 
















1,734.6 



















(^Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 
(2 >Includes post office wages and salaries. 

^Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining 
columns of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. 
•Revised. 
fPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



85 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees; 
at October 1962, employers in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total 
employment of 2,991,902. Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat 
smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage-earners for 
whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate 
to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-l— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 





Industrial Composite^ 1 ' 


Manufacturing 


Year and Month 


Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Average 


Employ- 
ment 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Employ- 
ment 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages 

and 

Salaries 


Weekly 
Wages 
and 

Salaries 


Averages 

1957 


122.6 
117.9 
119.7 
118.7 
118.1 

122.9 
121.6 
117.8 

115.2 
114.7 
115.2 
116.7 
121.3 
125.0 
125.8 
127.0 
126.5 
125.4 


158.1 
163.9 
171.0 
176.5 
181.8 

183.9 
183.5 
179.4 

184.5 
186.7 
187.2 
186.7 
188.1 
188.7 
188.3 
188.1 
189.5 
189.9 


67.93 

70.43 
73.47 
75.83 
78.11 

79.02 

78.82 
77.08 

79.27 
80.21 
80.41 
80.21 
80.79 
81.05 
80.90 
80.80 
81.40 
81.59 


115.8 
109.8 
111.1 
109.5 

108.9 

112.1 
110.9 
107.9 

108.5 
108.9 
109.6 
110.4 
113.7 
116.4 
115.5 
117.6 
117.6 
115.8 


159.1 
165.3 
172.5 

177.8 
183.6 

186.0 
186.2 
182.3 

187.1 
188.2 
189.3 
189.0 
190.4 
190.4 
189.1 
187.9 
190.8 
191.9 


69.94 


1958 


72.67 


1959 . 


75.84 


I960 . 


78.19 


1961. . . 


80.73 


1961— 


81.79 




81.87 




80.16 


1962— 


82.28 




82.74 




83.23 




83.11 




83.72 




83.72 


July 


83.13 




82.62 




83.91 




84.39 










^'Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and recrea- 
tional service). 

*Re vised. 

fPreliminary. 



86 



THE LABOUR GAZBTTM • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE C-2-AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Area 



Provinces 

Newfoundland 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta (including Northwest Territories) 
British Columbia (including Yukon) , 

Canada 

Urban Areas 

St. John's 

Sydney 

Halifax 

Moncton 

Saint John 

Chicoutimi — Jonquiere 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Shawinigan 

Three Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal 

Ottawa— Hull 

Kingston 

Peterborough 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

St. Catharines 

Niagara Falls 

Brantford 

Guelph 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Fort William— Port Arthur ' 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 



Employment 
Index Numbers 



Oct. 
1962 



147.1 

159.6 
96.6 
108.1 
126.3 
126.2 
115.1 
130.7 
162.5 
118.5 

125.4 



124 
112 

1 16 
110 

125 
[13 
83 

119 
84 

129 
1 J6 

123 
95 
192 
111 
Ml 
111 
1 (0 
87, 
129 
117. 

i ;»i 
128 

89, 
138 
129, 

74 
1 16, 
111, 
113, 
1 11 
143, 
207. 
182, 
115, 
117, 



Sept. 
1962 



150.6 
158.8 
98.5 
107.9 
126.6 
126.8 
116.7 
133.1 
167.4 
121.8 



126.5 



153.8 

83.7 
126.0 
108.2 
106.4 
110.5 
125.2 
112.9 

85.0 
117.1 

84.2 
129.6 
136.1 
119.1 

95.0 
187.4 
149.2 
115.2 
117.4 
110.0 

88.3 
129.6 
116. 
135. 
141. 



75.1 



149. 
111. 
114. 
146. 
146. 
211. 
183. 
118. 
121. 



Oct. 

1961 



158.2 
144.5 
98.2 
109.0 
124.0 
122.5 
114.4 
129.5 
160.9 
115.0 

122.9 



151.1 

81.5 
127.6 
110.0 
108.3 
110.3 
120.0 
113.4 
104.7 
117.1 

82.5 
127.2 
134.7 
116.7 

91.3 
177.8 
135.9 
110.6 
111.1 
102.2 

81.9 
124.2 
106.2 
127.7 
146.7 

90.1 
136.2 
129.0 

73.5 
146.1 
110.7 
113.4 
140.9 
141.5 
201.0 
176.2 
112.1 
109.7 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 



Oct. 

1962 



81.59 



61.02 
82.52 
67.85 
62.07 
65.66 

100.67 
70.62 
68.92 
88.40 
76.93 
67.18 
80.66 
76.39 
79.48 
91.85 
98.87 
85.03 
90.84 
93.83 
81.67 
77.11 
76.95 
72.66 
77.72 
92.24 
74.51 
77.52 

106.06 
92.79 

101.02 
82.90 
73.11 
76.83 
73.09 
77.64 
81.50 
86.87 
80.18 



Sept. 
1962 



73.65 
54.73 
66.04 
64.76 
78.70 
84.70 
77.53 
78.19 
83.27 
87.98 

81.40 



61.84 
80.98 
67.17 
62.69 
65.47 
99.84 
70.53 
69.39 
87.69 
75.97 
67.09 
81.01 
76.54 
80.12 
91.85 
94.97 
85.34 
90.83 
92.56 
78.47 
75.73 
77.25 
73.42 
78.01 
93.37 
73.67 
78.01 

104.35 
89.95 

103.21 
83.90 
73.80 
76.79 
73.05 
78.12 
82.44 
86.13 
79.74 



Oct. 

1961 



71.75 
56.30 
64.78 
64.14 
76.21 
82.13 
74.44 
75.03 
82.47 
85.98 

79.02 



56.72 
79.91 
64.82 
61.33 
64.15 
99.03 
67.61 
66.06 
85.29 
74.59 
63.42 
77.90 
73.46 
77.85 
87.82 
96.94 
82.18 
89.15 
89.57 
80.84 
73.96 
73.77 
70.78 
75.53 
91.74 
72.62 
75.56 
101.74 
88.25 
98.83 
80.94 
71.21 
74.31 
70.11 
76.93 
78.02 
84.50 
76.55 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



87 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 

Note: Information for other industries is given in Employment and Payrolls 



Industry 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial machinery 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Other chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



Employment 



Oct. 

1962 



116.1 

129.3 
68.8 

185.4 
82.5 
39.2 

259.5 

155.0 



115. 

119. 
112. 
121. 
137. 
138. 

98. 
112. 

97. 

80. 
110. 

89. 

95. 

78. 

83. 

74. 

63. 

93. 

94. 

99. 
100. 

76. 
109. 
111. 
120. 

81. 
128. 
128. 
127. 
127. 
112. 

61. 
159. 
111. 
110, 

96. 
131, 
125, 
120, 
111. 
113 
239, 
116, 
120, 

55 
146, 
122, 
143 
101, 
132, 
153 
112 
279 
150 

95 
149, 
138 
140, 
131, 
123, 
143 
130, 
152 



7 
1 
2 
6 
3 
9 
9 


138.0 

134.6 
143.8 
142.3 

157.3 

135.3 
132.3 

125.4 



Sept. 
1962 



118.2 

133.1 
68.6 

193.1 
82.6 
39.5 

258.9 

155.4 

117.6 

120.6 

115.0 

129.9 

135.9 

204.9 

99.5 

113.1 

96.2 

80.5 

109.7 

89.9 

96.7 

77.6 

83.6 

75.1 

63.0 

93.6 

96.1 

99.6 

104.5 

75.8 

112.1 

114.4 

121.2 

82.8 

130.1 

130.7 

128.7 

127.0 

113.7 

59.7 

161.6 

110.6 

111.6 

97.8 

131.1 

129.8 

124.2 

112.0 

113.3 

248.8 

113.2 

116.6 

57.2 

147.1 

126.2 

144.3 

103.6 

139.1 

153.0 

112.2 

278.7 

147.8 

96.5 

131.1 

139.5 

141.4 

132.4 

123.1 

144.1 

132.1 

149.7 

141.9 

138.2 
147.9 
142.8 

162.0 

140.6 
133.4 

126.5 



Oct. 

1961 



117.1 

130.5 
69.6 

187.2 
85.9 
43.7 

266.9 

148.2 

112.1 

113.9 
110.6 
119.9 
141.2 
122.4 
103.4 
111.7 
102.4 
80.5 
103.9 
87.6 
93.3 
77.4 
80.7 
75.4 
62.4 
86.0 
93.6 
95.2 
101.7 
74.7 
105.4 
106.6 
114.4 
82.1 
126.2 
126.4 
125.6 
125.5 
104.8 
54.2 
151.7 
105.1 
104.7 
92.1 
118.2 
120.5 
106.4 
111.6 
108.5 
259.6 
106.6 
104.5 
56.7 
133.5 
125.9 
142.2 
105.3 
141.0 
140.0 
102.1 
245.8 
147.8 
92.2 
161.5 
134.9 
137.6 
132.1 
120.8 
154.4 
130.0 
147.2 

136.9 

132.7 
143.9 
140.4 

152.7 

130.8 
128.0 

122.9 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 



Oct. 

1962 



s 

99.49 

100.62 
82.88 

106.74 

104.97 
80.37 

120.15 
86.68 

84.39 

91.'53 

78.05 
72.13 
83.47 
56.30 
82.63 
69.60 

103.03 
86.04 
89.68 
56.67 
53.86 
62.86 
67.40 
64.02 
62.80 
73.94 
53.12 
51.71 
53.78 
54.69 
73.31 
75.07 
72.11 
64.65 
99.62 

107.86 
79.71 
90.97 
96.52 
93.88 
98.65 
84.88 
83.87 
91.42 
92.58 

113.28 
96.50 
95.74 
98.47 
98.22 

115.30 
96.65 
84.52 
91.32 
96.03 
92.98 
91.91 

105.28 
90.66 
98.65 
87.33 
89.66 
79.64 
86.83 

121.49 

122.61 
99.77 
87.60 

113.53 
99.16 
73.23 

88.21 
95.51 
76.85 
86.49 

57.95 

44.10 
50.73 

81.59 



Sept. 


Oct. 


1962 


1961 


$ 


S 


99.15 


97.35 


99.43 


99.26 


80.68 


81.31 


105.61 


105.48 


105.49 


99.21 


79.63 


78.75 


121.62 


113.55 


88.21 


86.53 


83.91 


81.78 


91.36 


88.68 


77.37 


75.82 


69.90 


70.61 


82.68 


80.79 


52.97 


57.40 


82.85 


79.72 


69.95 


67.91 


102.27 


98.97 


86.04 


82.11 


87.86 


85.81 


56.99 


55.01 


54.57 


51.65 


62.45 


62.20 


67.82 


65.83 


64.76 


63.21 


63.37 


62.47 


73.85 


71.16 


53.37 


51.57 


52.34 


50.32 


54.60 


52.58 


52.91 


52.02 


73.93 


70.86 


75.59 


72.08 


73.07 


70.80 


64.81 


63.19 


99.12 


96.32 


107.08 


104.11 


79.74 


77.93 


91.79 


87.95 


96.67 


93.54 


98.99 


95.34 


100.30 


93.37 


85.58 


82.25 


84.48 


80.45 


91.79 


90.29 


93.61 


88.83 


109.68 


109.21 


95.17 


90.10 


95.34 


94.65 


96.66 


94.11 


97.51 


97. 0& 


109.28 


110.60 


94.38 


91.11 


87.03 


83.96 


91.29 


80.60 


95.45 


93.82 


92.73 


89.95 


92.17 


90.07 


104.09 


102.21 


91.35 


89.17 


100.08 


96.07 


87.58 


86.91 


90.49 


87.30 


81.08 


78.76 


87.87 


84.80 


120.97 


117.87 


122.16 


118.60 


99.08 


96. CO 


86.62 


84.19 


114.43 


106.88 


98.16 


95.80 


74.04 


71.86 


88.87 


84.48 


96.50 


92.07 


77.02 


72.76 


86.78 


83.70 


57.23 


55.89 


43.32 


42.79 


50.73 


48.68 


81.40 


79.02 



88 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE C-4— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING, BY PROVINCE 

(Hourly Rated Wage-Earners) 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings DBS 
Note: Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Average Hours Worked 



October 
1962 



September 
1962 



October 
1961 



Average Hourly Earnings* 



October 
1962 



September 
1962 



October 
1961 



Newfoundland 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta (includes Northwest Territories) 
(includes Yukon 



British Columbia 
Territory) 



38.1 
40.9 

40.2 
42.3 
41.5 
40.1 
38.9 
40.1 

37.9 



38.4 
39.9 
40.1 
42.5 
41.6 
40.6 
38.6 
39.8 

38.0 



38.1 
39.6 
40.5 
42.2 
41.4 
40.2 
39.0 
40.7 

37.7 



S 

1.69 
1.64 
1.60 
1.70 
1.99 
1.76 
1.98 
1.99 

2.29 



$ 

1.68 
1.64 
1.55 
1.69 
1.97 
1.76 
1.97 
1.97 

2.27 



S 
1.71 
1.58 
1.62 
1.65 
1.93 
1.73 
1.95 
1.97 

2.24 



•Includes shift differential, premium pay for overtime, pay for paid holidays, pay for paid sick leave if paid through 
payroll but not if paid under insurance plan, incentive bonus but not annual bonus. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



89 



TABLE C-5— HOURS AND EARNINGS, BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly Rated Wage-Earners) 
Source: Man Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry- 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables. 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

* Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

*Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

*Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

* Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

"■Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and appli- 
ances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

*Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Professional and scientific equipment 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

"Durable manufactured goods industries. 

90 



Average Weekly 
Hours 



Oct. Sept. Oct. 
1962 1962 1961 



42.2 

42.2 
43.7 
41.6 
41.6 
42.9 
39.5 
43.2 
41.3 
41.9 
40.8 
40.2 
■41.1 
39.3 
41.3 
41.0 
42.7 
38.9 
39.9 
43.3 
40.4 
39.6 
42.3 
42.9 
41.2 
43.2 
44.2 
39.2 
38.9 
37.3 
42.6 
41.7 
40.6 
44.2 
42.7 
41.7 
41.8 
41.6 
38.9 
41.9 
37.2 
43.4 
43.6 
42.0 
42.3 
42.7 
41.2 
42.2 
42.4 
41.7 
41.1 
44.1 
42.3 
39.1 
41.0 
41.3 
42.5 
41.8 
40.4 
41.5 
42.1 
41.2 

40.2 
43.0 
41.4 
43.7 
43.0 
41.1 
41.3 
41.3 
41.2 
40.2 
41.7 
42.1 
40.7 
41.8 
41.5 
42.3 
43.9 
37.9 
37.6 
40.3 



41.6 

41.1 
41.8 
40.9 
41.4 
42.4 
40.0 
43.8 
41.4 
42.0 
40.8 
40.1 
40.8 
40.1 
41.9 
41.3 
41.1 



42.6 
40.9 
40.8 
41.2 
43.1 
41.6 
43.6 
44.4 
39.5 
39.5 
37.6 
42.2 
42.5 
41.5 
44.9 
42.8 
41.6 
41.5 
41.7 
39.3 
41.9 
41.0 
43.1 
43.7 
42.3 
42.3 
43.3 
39.7 
42.6 
42.1 
41.2 
40.9 
41.5 
41.8 
40.6 
41.2 
41.0 
42.3 
41.8 
40.2 
42.1 
42.9 
41.4 

41.0 
43.2 
42.1 
44.3 
43.8 
41.9 
41.2 
41.1 
41.2 
39.9 
42.2 
42.2 
40.9 
42.6 
42.1 
43.7 
44.1 
37.8 
37.2 
40.5 



42.7 

43.0 
43.5 
42.8 
41.0 
42.1 
39.2 
43.7 
41.2 
41.6 
40.8 
40.2 
40.7 
39.5 
42.5 
41.4 
42.1 
39.0 
40.3 
42.2 
40.6 
39.7 
42.5 
43.1 
42.0 
44.0 
44.0 
39.3 
38.8 
37.8 
42.5 
41.8 
40.4 
44.5 
43.0 
41.8 
41.7 
41.9 
39.1 
41.6 
39.7 
40.8 
42.5 
41.9 
42.9 
41.7 
41.2 
41.5 
42.5 
41.2 
42.1 
44.4 
40.8 
39.3 
38.1 
41.0 
42.1 
42.1 
40.0 
41.6 
41.5 
41.4 

39.4 

43.0 
42.2 
43.8 
43.4 
41.8 
41.3 
41.2 
40.9 
40.3 
40.3 
42.5 
41.5 
41.9 
41.8 
42.0 
43.8 
38.7 
38.6 
40.0 



Average Hourly 

Earnings 



Oct. Sept. Oct. 
1962 1962 1961 



$ 
2.18 

2.26 
1.77 
2.45 
2.09 
1.84 
2.52 
1.96 
1.89 
2.05 
1.73 
1.61 
1.92 
1.23 
1.83 
1.54 
2.18 
2.38 
2.00 
1.96 
1.30 
1.25 
1.40 
1.43 
1.46 
1.33 
1.52 
1.22 
1.22 
1.30 
1.15 
1.67 
1.78 
1.52 
1.40 
2.26 
2.44 
1.75 
2.32 
2.19 
2.21 
2.17 
1.82 
1.87 



2.07 
2.05 
2.64 
2.08 
2.14 
2.24 
2.16 
2.49 
2.16 
2.11 
2.21 
2.16 
1.93 
2.07 
2.44 
1.91 
2.14 
1.72 

1.95 
2.17 
1.81 
1.93 
1.72 
1.95 
2.66 
2.70 
2.11 
1.65 
2.44 
1.52 
1.87 
2.07 
2.26 
1.72 
1.98 
1.12 
1.08 
1.06 



$ 
2.19 

2.28 
1.78 
2.46 
2.09 
1.84 
2.53 
1.96 
1.88 
2.05 
1.72 
1.57 
1.92 
1.18 
1.83 
1.55 
2.18 
2.37 
2.00 
1.94 
1.28 
1.23 
1.39 
1.43 
1.47 
1.33 
1.51 
1 . 23 
1.22 
1.33 
1.14 
1.67 
1.78 
1.53 
1.39 
2.26 
2.45 
1.76 
2.32 
2.19 
2.21 
2.17 
1.82 
1.85 
2.08 
2.06 
2.63 
2.12 
2.15 
2.21) 
15 
14 
13 
10 
IS 
17 



1.94 
2.08 
2.42 
1.93 
2.16 
1.72 

1.96 
2.17 
1.83 
1.93 
1.73 
1.94 



1.87 
2.05 
2.25 
1.71 
1.98 
1.11 
1.07 
1.06 



$ 
2.13 

2.20 
1.74 
2.37 
2.03 
1.84 
2.38 
1.94 
1.84 
2.00 
1.68 
1.59 
1.87 
1.25 
1.79 
1.49 
2.07 
2.35 
1.90 
1.91 
1.24 
1.19 
1.35 
1.39 
1.42 
1.31 
1.45 
1.19 
1.19 
1.25 
1.11 
1.62 
1.72 
1.49 
1.35 
2.18 
2.36 
1.71 
2.24 
2.14 
2.13 
2.08 
1.78 
1.82 
2.02 
1.99 
2.57 
2.06 
2.10 
2.17 
2.14 
2.41 
2.09 
2.08 
2.06 
2.15 
1.88 
2.03 
2.41 
1.88 
2.08 
1.73 

1.90 
2.11 
1.79 
1.89 
1.70 
1.91 
2.59 
2.61 
2.04 
1.57 
2.37 
1.48 
1.83 
1.97 
2.15 
1.66 
1.91 
1.08 
1.05 
1.03 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Oct. Sept. Oct. 
1962 1962 1961 



$ 
92.09 

95.23 
77.24 

101.94 
86.99 
79.15 
99.43 
84.92 
77.95 
85.96 
70.48 
64.82 
79.11 
48.19 
75.60 
63.34 
92.85 
92.59 
80.05 
85.14 
52.42 
49.44 
59.06 
61.32 
60.30 
57.34 
67.21 
48.01 
47.48 
48.38 
48.88 
69.66 
72.24 
67.24 
59.51 
94.19 

102.13 
72.95 
90.13 
91.89 
82.27 
94.12 
79.35 
78.51 
87.73 
87.59 

108.79 
87.61 
90.60 
93.31 
88.81 

109.92 
91.44 
82.42 
90.40 
89.43 
82.13 
86.46 
98.37 
79.40 
90.13 
70.64 

78.57 
93.20 
74.97 
84.49 
74.09 
80.16 
110.01 
111.40 
86.97 
66.39 
101.63 
63.98 
76.21 
86.25 
93.51 
72.95 
86.89 
42.38 
40.54 
42.80 



$ 
91.34 

93.82 
74.39 

100.74 
86.78 
78.05 

100.97 
85.99 
77.61 
85.92 
70.00 
62.80 
78.59 
47.32 
76.73 
64.00 
89.61 
94.24 
79.76 
82.83 
52.51 
50.33 
57.40 
61.77 
60.91 
58.15 
67. 13 
48.70 
48.13 
49.95 
48.27 
71.01 
73.73 
68.62 
59.55 
93.89 

101.51 
73.31 
91.13 
92.00 
90.76 
93.65 
79.57 
78.48 
88.09 
89.13 

104.44 
90.44 
90.48 
90.87 
88.12 

101.29 
88.77 
85.14 
89.93 
88.97 
82.07 
87.16 
97.31 
81.11 
92.69 
71.33 

80.20 
94.03 
77.22 
85.62 
75.85 
81.22 
109.05 
110.46 
86.73 
65.05 
103.45 
64.72 
76.62 
87.51 
94.67 
74.59 
87.12 
42.10 
39.83 
43.00 



$ 
90.90 

94.56 
75.69 

101.54 
83.33 
77.29 
93.60 
84.83 
75.69 
83.39 
68.72 
64.16 
76.39 
49.37 
75.92 
61.87 
86.95 
91.65 
76.65 
80.78 
50.45 
47.15 
57.61 
59.84 
59.47 
57.71 
63.93 
46.67 
46.11 
47.28 
47.26 
67.50 
69.55 
66.35 
58.14 
90.11 
98.46 
71.73 
87.61 
89.09 
84.58 
84.61 
75.68 
76.17 
86.57 
83.11 

105.77 
85.48 
89.46 
89.15 
90.01 

106.80 
85.39 
81.90 
78.34 
87.92 
79.04 
85.53 
96.36 
78.44 
86.40 
71.61 

74.87 
90.76 
75.65 
82.60 
73.57 
79.83 
106.93 
107.60 
83.63 
63.39 
95.28 
62.97 
75.95 
82.69 
89.95 
69.56 
83.67 
41.68 
40.44 
41.35 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATES 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man- Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 



Period 



Hours 
Worked 
Per week 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 



Current 
Dollars 



1949 
Dollars 



Monthly Average 1957 
Monthly Average 1958 
Monthly Average 1959 
Monthly Average 1960 
Monthly Average 1961 

Last Pay Period in: 

1961 October 

November.. , 
December. . . 

1962 January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Juno 

July 

August 

September* . 
October t 



40.4 
40.2 
40.7 
40.4 
40.6 



41.2 
46.2 
38.8 

40.6 
40.8 
41.0 
40.6 
41.0 
41.1 
41.0 
41.0 
41.4 
41.3 



S3 



87 



64.96 
66.77 
70.16 
71.96 
74.27 



75.69 
75.64 
72.85 

75.47 
75.99 
76.68 
76.50 
77.51 
77.52 
76.72 
76.17 
77.61 
77.95 



155.6 
160.0 
168.1 
172.4 
177.9 



181.3 
181.2 
174.5 

180.8 
182.1 
183.7 
183.3 
185.7 
185.7 
183.8 
182.5 
185.9 



127.4 
127.7 
132.8 
134.5 
137.7 



139.8 
139.6 
134.6 

139.3 
140.4 
141.0 
140.9 
142.3 
141.8 
139.9 
139.3 
141.4 
141.6 



Note: The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. 

*Revised. 

tPrelimmary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



91 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

Statistics presented in the following tables relate to registrations for employment and 
vacancies notified by employers at NES offices. These data are derived from reports 
prepared in National Employment Service offices and processed in the Unemployment 
Insurance Section, D.B.S. See also Technical Note, page 1089, September 1962 issue. 

TABLE D-l— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Period 


Unfilled Vacancies* 


Registrations for Employment 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


End of: 


7,450 
8,643 
9,097 
9,859 

11,402 

11,428 
12,308 
15,184 
25,557 
22,026 
22,436 
22,872 
21,214 
20,197 
20,137 
22,077 
14,281 


7,270 
8,549 
9,779 
7,996 

10,866 

12,069 
13,073 
15,359 
18,868 
20,999 
20,672 
17,895 
21,256 
20,658 
17,399 
19,204 
13,638 


14,720 
17,192 
18,876 
17,855 

22,268 

23,497 
25,381 
30,543 
44,425 
43,025 
43,108 
40,767 
42,470 
40,855 
37,536 
41,281 
27,919 


596,104 
562,257 
522,206 
570,789 

478,470 

570,061 
585,555 
579,641 
496,099 
329,391 
237,747 
224,452 
198,639 
188,844 
232,316 
328,801 
473,575 


147,349 
158,163 
157,962 
163,893 

136,566 

161,094 
161,992 
158,342 
146,551 
126,461 
119,561 
113,407 
96,606 
97,890 
105,488 
127,955 
137,429 


743,453 


December 1958 


720,420 




680,168 


December 1960 


734,682 


December 1961 


615,036 


January 1962 


731,155 


February 1962 


747,547 


March 1962 


737,983 


April 1962 


642,650 


May 1962 


455,852 


June 1962 


357,308 


July 1962 


337,859 


August 1962 


295,245 


September 1962 


286,734 


October 1962 


337,804 


November 1962d> 


456,756 


December 19620) 


611,004 







(1 > Latest figures subject to revision. 

* Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-2— REGISTRATIONS RECEIVED, VACANCIES NOTIFIED AND 

PLACEMENTS EFFECTED DURING YEAR 1958-1961 AND DURING 

MONTH NOVEMBER 1961— NOVEMBER 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Year and Month 



Registrations Received 



Female 



Vacancies Notified 



Male 



Female 



Placements Effected 



Male 



Female 



1958 Year 

1959 Year 

1960 Year 

1961 Year 

1961 — November 
December. 

1962— January.... 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 



2,790,412 
2,753,997 
3,046,572 
3,125,195 

328,443 
361,979 

343,460 
244,177 
250,908 
226,940 
239,245 
231,507 
251,079 
236,921 
220,755 
272,614 
321,696(D 



1,012,974 
1,037,536 
1,107,427 
1,106,790 

108,175 
91,992 

109,466 
75,220 
81,800 
79,051 
95,925 
100,426 
114,963 
104,366 
98,476 
103,871 
113,014(D 



620,394 
753,904 
724,098 
836,534 

83,750 
62,933 

57,373 
56,595 
60,933 
82,893 

117,362 
92,346 
97,147 

102,784 
96,217 

101,603 
86.859R 



374,245 
421,927 
404,824 
469,119 

38,498 
36,436 

35,946 
30,459 
37,064 
40,026 
51,441 
48,564 
56,863 
63,558 
50,615 
45,949 
43.840R 



548,663 
661,872 
641,872 
748,790 

70,353 
61,219 

49,668 
48,546 
50,161 
65,841 
107,811 
86,218 
85,399 
89,871 
91,653 
89,619 
74,957 



291,466 
324,201 
316,428 
371,072 

28,162 
35,284 

26,878 
22,688 
27,365 
29,194 
38,595 
39,253 
49,523 
50,865 
42,692 
38,324 
33,481 



(!) Preliminary. 
R-re vised. 



92 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE D-&-PLACEMENTS EFFECTED, BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX, DURING 

NOVEMBER 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Industry Group 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change 

November 

1961 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except clothing) 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries. . . 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment 

Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage. 

Communication 

Public Utility Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

( Government Service 

' Recreation Service 

Business Service 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



2,984 

702 

356 
168 
83 
44 
51 

13,286 

1,393 
190 



471 

424 

1,612 

694 

618 

2,607 

2,314 

434 

550 

467 

34 

339 

763 

13,486 

9,260 
4,226 

9,990 

9,318 

606 

66 

255 

8,378 
3,090 

5,288 

484 

21,783 

855 
14,826 

364 
1,506 
4,232 



2,830 
21 

56 

14 

27 

1 

2 

12 

7,434 

1,375 

113 

67 

356 

363 

1,771 
214 
314 
537 
383 
236 



129 

14 

237 

517 

162 

84 

78 

350 

169 
55 
126 

33 

0,923 

1,097 
5,826 

S40 

14,832 

1,215 

2,688 

147 

701 

10,081 



6,439 

3,005 

758 
370 
195 
84 
46 
63 

20,720 

2,768 

303 

155 

644 

834 

2,195 

1,826 

1,008 

1,155 

2,990 

2,550 

614 

1,178 

596 

48 

576 



13,648 

9,344 
4,304 

10,340 

9,487 
661 
192 



15,301 

4,187 
11,114 

1,324 

36,615 

2,070 

17,514 

511 

2,207 
14,313 



+ 3,390 
+ 813 

- 77 



+ 2,590 



553 

108 

38 

80 

91 

70 

194 

362 

185 

789 

508 

24 

114 

133 

19 



+ 306 

-f 1,409 

+ 933 
+ 476 



1,309 

1,428 

102 

17 



844 

360 
484 



+ 83 

+ 2,243 

+ 382 

- 380 

8 

+ 362 

+ 1,887 



74,957 



33,481 



108,438 



+ 9,923 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 963 



93 



TABLE D-4.— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX, 

AS AT NOVEMBER 30, 1962d> 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission.) 



Occupational Group 



Professional and Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Personal and Domestic Service Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) , 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Food and kindred products (incl. tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products , 

Stone, clay and glass products , 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) , 

Communications and public utility 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

Grand Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



8,451 
18,213 

8,061 
34,647 

1,556 

5,922 

136,948 

1,406 

2,962 

12,096 

1,327 

995 

424 

12,588 

2,126 

947 

1,958 

37,404 

27,228 

741 

5,517 

20,792 

3,025 

5,412 

115,003 

4,879 

11,800 

5,255 

58,566 

34,503 



328,801 



Female 



1,933 

47,435 

13,669 

25,884 

19 

254 

17,255 
462 

10,916 
119 
477 
853 
40 
725 
854 
27 



5 

97 

1 

1,644 

768 

255 

12 

21,506 

6,321 

316 

412 

13 

14,444 



127,955 



Total 



10,384 

65,648 

21,730 

60,531 

1,575 

6,176 

154,203 

1,868 

13,878 

12,215 

1,804 

1,848 

464 

13,313 

2,980 

974 

1,958 

37,409 

27,325 

742 

7,161 

21,560 

3,280 

5,424 

136,509 
11,200 
12,116 
5,667 
58,579 
48,947 



456,756 



ft) Preliminary— subject to revision. 



94 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE D-5— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, AT 

NOVEMBER 30, 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Office 



Newfoundland 

Corner Brook 

Grand Falls 

St. John's 

Prince Edward Island. 

Charlottetown 

Summerside 

Nova Scotia 

Amherst 

Bridgewater 

Halifax 

Inverness 

Kentville 

Liverpool 

New Glasgow 

Springhill 

Sydney.... 

Sydney Mines 

Truro 

Yarmouth 

New Brunswick 

Bathurst 

Campbellton 

Edmundston 

Fredericton 

Minto 

^Moncton 

Newcastle 

Saint John 

St. Stephen 

Sussex 

Woodstock 

Quebec 

Alma 

Asbestos 

Baie Comeau 

Beauharnois 

Buckingham 

Causapscal 

Chandler 

Chicoutimi 

Cowansville 

Dolbeau 

Drummondville 

Parnham 

Forestville 

Gaspe 

Granby 

Hull 

Joliette 

Jonquiere 

Lachute 

Lac Megantic 

La Malbaie 

La Tuque 

Levis 

Louise ville 

Magog 

Maniwaki 

Matane 

Mont-Laurier 

Montmagny 

Montreal 

New Richmond 

Port Alfred 

Quebec 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup.. ."... 

Roberval 

Rouyn 

Ste. Agathe des Monts 
Ste. Anne de Belle vue. 

Ste. Therese 

St. Hyacinthe 

St. Jean 

St. Jerome 

Sept-lies 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 



Registrations 




Previous 


Nov. 30, 
1902 


Year 

Nov. 30, 

1961 


14,060 


11,255 


2,950 


2,443 


1,528 


1,094 


9,582 


7,718 


2,568 


2,018 


1,612 


1,224 


956 


794 


19,894 


18,942 


783 


646 


941 


719 


5,718 


4,723 


413 


363 


1,526 


1,328 


481 


396 


1,970 


2,062 


871 


818 


3,523 


4,284 


954 


986 


1,190 


1,315 


1,434 


1,302 


19,814 


15,934 


2,619 


1,850 


1,453 


1.177 


1,394 


1,155 


1,642 


1,242 


307 


339 


5,109 


3,856 


1,653 


1,141 


2,945 


2,857 


997 


1,132 


483 


386 


1,212 


799 


139,181 


129,937 


1,872 


1,572 


645 


474 


834 


672 


846 


953 


796 


745 


1,178 


1,183 


1,343 


1,137 


2,275 


2,032 


323 


288 


1,026 


1,134 


1,804 


1,524 


478 


432 


436 


550 


893 


870 


1,949 


1,694 


3,454 


2,900 


3,029 


2,585 


2,764 


2,250 


855 


566 


772 


539 


1,004 


978 


806 


843 


1,945 


2.301 


754 


779 


550 


464 


495 


552 


1,298 


1,492 


738 


704 


1,196 


1,287 


51,427 


47,755 


1,070 


993 


842 


673 


9,743 


9,383 


2,269 


2,668 


2,719 


2.531 


1,101 


1,210 


2,549 


2,439 


597 


571 


802 


707 


2,004 


1,587 


1,351 


1,417 


1,850 


1,621 


1,380 


1,242 


1,625 


1.400 


3,590 


3,510 


3,966 


3,994 



Office 



Quebec— Concluded 

Sorel 

Thetford Mines 

Trois-Rivieres 

Vald'Or 

Valley field 

Victoria ville 

Ville St. Georges.. 



Ontario 

Arnprior 

Barrie 

Belleville 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Carleton Place... 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Elliot Lake 

Fort Erie 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Hawkesbury 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake. . 

Kitchener 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

London 

Long Branch 

Midland 

Napanee 

Newmarket 

New Liskeard< 3 >. 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Oakville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Colborne. . . 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines.. . 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout. . . 

Smiths Falls 

Stratford 

Sturgeon Falls . . . 

Sudbury 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins 

Toronto 

Trenton ; 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Registrations 



(i) 

Nov. 30, 

1962 



1.530 
1,375 
4,241 
1,402 
1,766 
1,983 
1,641 

141,479 

255 

1,134 

1,291 

781 

933 

2,066 

470 

198 

1,678 

674 

560 

2,566 

424 

621 

576 

1,941 

1,177 

287 

439 

1,272 

9,646 

655 

816 

1.C40 

1,862 

820 

1,805 

927 

489 

229 

4,100 

2,854 

786 

515 

997 

495 

2,295 

1,581 

579 

786 

4,663 

7,357 

1,014 

500 

1,508 

434 

2,428 

322 

2,562 

1,156 

486 

396 

3,276 

1,146 

2,261 

2,986 

967 



463 

697 

818 

4,779 

598 

1,521 

32,300 

626 

425 

485 

1,757 

2,737 

7,619 

572 



Previous 
Year 

Nov. 30, 
1961 



1,674 
1,040 
3,548 
1,537 
1,695 
1,443 
1,799 

149,982 

310 

1,035 

1,615 

985 

1,036 

2,616 

566 

232 

1,877 

834 

614 

2,431 

635 

585 

647 

2,045 

1,122 

351 

482 

1,623 

10,974 

541 

1,084 

984 

2,217 

1,387 

2,006 



297 

3,835 

3,249 

696 

506 

1,136 



2,355 

1,455 

732 

787 

3,972 

6,317 

1,101 

511 

1,572 

456 

2,819 

302 

3,523 

768 

594 

369 

3,763 

1,245 

2,573 

2,213 

825 

242 

380 

689 

892 

3,227 

419 

2,085 

35,512 

571 

541 

584 

2,054 

3,028 

8,793 

864 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



TABLE D-5-BEGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, 

NOVEMBEB 30, 1962— Concluded 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



AT 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


0) 

Nov. 30, 

1962 


Previous 
Year 

Nov. 30, 
1961 


(i) 

Nov. 30, 
1962 


Previous 
Year 

Nov. 30, 
1961 




22,377 

1,659 

1,159 

177 

917 

419 

18,046 

14,357 

291 

286 

1,146 

917 

2,437 

3,225 

3,420 

629 

314 

1,692 

27,697 

383 
9,477 

370 
11,897 

446 

747 
2,210 
1,139 
1,028 


23,033 

1,772 
1,244 

223 
1,047 

346 
18,401 

16,292 

417 

360 

1,416 

960 

1,980 

4,272 

3,610 

925 

443 

1,909 

28,105 

362 
8,994 

424 
12,444 

398 

800 
2,163 
1,290 
1,230 


British Columbia 


55,419 

1,653 
978 
862 

1,173 
845 

1,249 
850 
141 
933 

1,144 
740 

8,112 

1,071 
716 

2,632 

1,432 

381 

866 

696 

23,416 

1,357 

3,642 
530 

456,756 

328,801 
127,955 


58,774 






1,941 






981 






800 






840 


The Pas 




791 






1,370 






1,149 






158 






1,155 




Nanaimo 


986 






937 


North Battleford 




9,081 






1,351 






636 






2,145 






1,393 






455 






983 




Trail 


748 


Alberta 




24,797 






1,801 






3,724 






552 




CANADA 






454,272 










329,306 








Red Deer 


124,966 









(!> Preliminary subject to revision. 

< 2 > Includes 539 registrations reported by the Magdalen Islands local office. 
(*) Prior to May 1962 figures included with Kirkland Lake local office. 
'*> Winnipeg includes Sioux Lookout as of November 1, 1962. 



96 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment insurance statistics are concerned with numbers of persons covered by 
insurance and claimants for benefit at Unemployment Insurance Commission local 
offices. The data are compiled in the Unemployment Insurance Section, D.B.S. from 
information supplied by the UIC. For further information regarding the nature of the 
data see Technical Note, page 1432, December 1962 issue. 

TABLE E-l— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



End of: 



Total 



Employed 



Claimants 



1962— September 
August 

July 

June 

May 

April 

March 

February.. 
January . . . 

1961— December. 
November 
October . . . 
September 



3,893,000 
3,995,000 
3,976,000 
3,954,000 
3,889,000 
4,064,000 
4,144,000 
4,161,000 
4,158,000 

4,139,000 
4,023,000 
3,940,000 
3,913,000 



3,695,200 
3,796,300 
3,764,000 
3,739,700 
3,625,100 
3,499,500 
3,456,500 
3,442,300 
3,459,500 

3,537,800 
3,637,000 
3,671,300 
3,683,800 



197,800 
198,700 
212,000 
214,300 
263,900 
564,500 
687,500 
718,700 
698,500 

601,200 
386,000 
268,700 
229,200 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



97 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT BY PROVINCE, 

OCTOBER, 1962 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending 
at end of Month 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




3,610 

445 

6,389 

5,832 

44,318 

50,915 

6,001 

3,623 

8,881 

20,430 


2,328 

293 

4,020 

3,669 

27,681 

32,609 

3,830 

2,577 

5,809 

12,708 


1,282 

152 

2.369 

2,163 

16,637 

18,306 

2,171 

1,046 

3.072 

7,722 


3,035 

394 
5,640 
5,048 
38,930 
45,523 
5.412 
2,900 
6,439 
17,944 


2,035 

293 

4,139 

3,665 

28,203 

31,705 

3,720 

1,899 

4,278 

11, -953 


1,000 

101 

1,501 

1,383 

10,727 

13,818 

1,692 

1,001 

2,161 

5,991 


1,350 




150 




2,011 




1,968 




15,209 




15,905 




1,814 




1,378 




4,304 




5,978 






Total, Canada, October 1962 


150,444 
98,293 
158,060 


95,524 
60,512 
96,870 


54,920 
37,781 
61,190 


131,265 
96,489 
146,330 


91,890 
67,175 
102,637 


39,375 
29,314 
43,693 


50,067 


Total, Canada, September 1962 

Total, Canada, October 1961 


30,888 
47,884 



*In addition, revised claims received numbered 40,592. 

tin addition, 42,804 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 3,938 were special requests not granted and 2,362 
were appeals by claimants. There were 8,821 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



98 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES, BY 

NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, AND PERCENTAGE 

POSTAL, OCTOBER 31, 1962 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province and Sex 


Total 
claimants 


Number of weeks on claim 
(based on 20 per cent sample) 


Percent- 
age 
Postal 


October 
31, 1961 


2 or 
Less 


3-4 


5-8 


9-12 


13-16 


17-20 


Over 
20 


total 
claimants 




244,140 
165,316 
78,824 


93,324 
70,508 
22,816 


33,993 

24,620 

9,373 


39,314 
25,101 
14,213 


21,303 
12,942 
8,361 


14,126 
7,794 
6,332 


9,996 
5,152 

4,844 


32,084 
19,199 

12,885 


30.0 
30.9 
28.1 


268,682 


Male 


185,454 




83,228 








6,063 

5,232 

831 

880 
593 

287 

12,526 
9,812 
2,714 

10,242 
7,969 
2,273 

73,359 
51,038 
22,321 

78,959 
49,967 
28,992 

11,314 
7,129 
4,185 

5,941 
3,603 
2,338 

13,676 

8,801 
4,872 

31,180 
21,169 
10,011 


1,486 

1,380 

106 

214 

167 
47 

3,923 

3,192 

731 

3,614 

5,049 

565 

28,341 

21,706 

6,635 

31,019 
22,543 

8,476 

4,565 
3,171 
1,394 

2,360 
1,713 

647 

5,657 
4,238 
1,419 

12,145 
9,349 
2,796 


807 

758 

49 

175 
123 
52 

1,602 

1,333 

269 

1,387 

1,069 

318 

9,896 
7,331 
2,565 

11,327 
7,814 
3,513 

1,240 
825 
415 

842 
577 
265 

1,754 

1,195 

559 

4,963 
3,595 
1,368 


948 
811 
137 

188 
119 
69 

2,028 
1,550 

478 

1,699 

1,307 

392 

12,318 
8,637 
3,681 

12,002 
6,727 
5,275 

1,708 

1,048 

660 

893 
411 

482 

2,242 
1 , 158 
1,084 

5,288 
3,333 
1,955 


722 
595 
127 

84 
48 
36 

1,482 

1,125 

357 

957 
712 
245 

6,298 
3,973 
2,325 

6,431 
3,509 
2,922 

963 
503 
460 

481 
249 
232 

1,190 

597 
593 

2,695 
1,631 
1,064 


397 

314 

83 

43 
27 
16 

640 
177 
163 

646 
427 
219 

4,528 
2,585 
1,943 

4,339 
2,184 
2,155 

728 
383 
345 

305 
138 
167 

868 
450 
418 

1,632 
809 
823 


296 
224 

72 

34 
24 
10 

583 
410 
173 

461 
313 

148 

3,080 
1,632 
1,448 

3,264 

1,378 
1,886 

366 
221 
145 

277 
122 
155 

506 
257 
249 

1,129 
571 
558 


1,407 

1,150 

257 

142 

85 
57 

2,268 

1,725 

543 

1,478 

1,092 

386 

8,898 
5, 174 
3,724 

10,577 
5,812 
4,765 

1,744 
978 
766 

783 
393 
390 

1,459 
909 
550 

3,328 
1,881 
1,447 


63.0 
63.5 
59.7 

58.3 
62.1 
50.5 

41.4 
42.0 
39.4 

51.2 
53.9 
41.9 

26.4 
26.4 
26.6 

23.5 
22.8 
24.7 

22.2 
23.6 
19.7 

41.1 
44.4 
36.0 

57.0 
59.6 
52.2 

24.9 
26.5 

21.4 


5,461 




4,513 




948 


Prince Edward Island 


765 
471 




291 




12,134 




9,332 




2,802 




9,272 


Male 


6,484 




2,788 




79,590 


Male 


55,591 




23,999 




90,451 




60,316 




30,135 




13,703 


Male 


9,782 




3,921 




7,356 




4,846 




2,510 


Alberta 

Male 


14,717 
9,474 


Female 


5,243 


British Columbia 

Male 


35,233 
24,645 


Female 


10,588 







Note: Numbers less than 50 subject to relatively large sampling variability. 



TABLE E-l— BENEFIT PAYMENTS, BY PROVINCE, OCTOBER 1962 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Weeks Paid* 


Amount of 
Benefit Paid 


Newfoundland 


18,869 

2,762 

36,873 

29,361 

201,187 

225,508 

26,892 

15,223 

33,452 

82,519 


430,840 


Prince Edward Island 


57,714 


JN ova Scotia 


832,660 


New Brunswick 


644,427 


Quebec 


4 748 126 


Ontario 


5,261,250 


Manitoba 


619 286 


Saskatchewan 


332,970 


Alberta 


800,286 


British Columbia 


2,026,182 






Total, Canada, October 1962 


672,646 
542,054 
727,724 


15,753,741 


Total, Canada, September 1962 .- 


12,664,177 


Total, Canada, October 1961 


17,115,047 







'Weeks paid" represent the total of complete and partial weeks of benefit paid during the month. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



99 



F — Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

1957 Weighted 

(1949-100) 

Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Total 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Transpor- 
tation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 


1959— Year 


127.2 

128.4 

129.2 

130.7 

129.8 

129.7 
129.8 
129.7 
130.3 
130.1 
130.5 
131.0 
131.4 
131.0 
131.5 
131.9 
131.9 


122.2 

122.6 

124.0 

126.2 

124.5 

124.8 
125.0 
124.4 
125.8 
124.5 
125.6 
127.0 
128.4 
126.8 
127.2 
127.7 
127.8 


131.5 

132.9 

133.2 

134.8 

133.8 

134.0 
134.0 
134.0 
134.0 
134.5 
134.9 
135.1 
135.1 
135.2 
135.4 
135.6 
135.7 


109.7 

111.0 

112.5 

113.5 

113.7 

111.6 
111.8 
112.9 
U3.2 
112.8 
113.1 
112.9 
112.7 
113.3 
115.6 
116.0 
115.8 


140.5 
141.1 
140.6 

140.4 
141.1 

140.6 

140.7 
139.9 
140.2 
140.4 
140.4 
140.7 
140.8 
140.3 
139.9 
140.6 
140.2 


151.0 

154.8 

155.3 

158.3 

156.8 

156.8 
157.2 
157.2 
158.1 
158.2 
158.2 
158.4 
158.2 
158.2 
160.0 
159.8 
159.8 


144.4 
145.6 
146.1 
147.3 
146.3 

146.6 

146.7 
146.7 
146.6 
147.1 
147.0 
147.8 
147.8 
147.6 
147.8 
148.2 
148.2 


113.8 


1960— Year 


115.8 


1961— Year 


116.3 


1962— Year 


117.8 


1961 — December 


117.3 


1962— January 


117.3 




117.2 




117.5 




117.9 




117.9 




117.9 


July 


117.9 




118.0 




118.0 




118.0 




117.8 




117.8 







TABLE F-2.— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA 
AT THE BEGINNING OF NOVEMBER 1962 

(1949 = 100) 





All-items 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Trans- 
portation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recrea- 
tion 
and 

Reading 


Tobacco 




Nov. 
1961 


Oct. 
1962 


Nov. 
1962 


and 
Alcohol 


CDSt. John's Nfld 

Halifax 


116.4 
129.7 
130.8 
130.8 
131.8 
131.9 
128.9 
126.4 
125.7 
130.1 


118.1 
130.8 
131.4 
131.3 
132.1 
133.1 
129.5 
127.9 
126.9 
130.2 


118.1 
130.9 
131.4 
132.0 
132.7 
133.2 
130.1 
128.0 
127.4 
130.6 


112.4 
123.5 
125.3 
132.1 
127.2 
125.9 
127.9 
125.4 
122.6 
127.7 


114.6 
134.3 
130.9 
134.7 
137.4 
139.7 
129.5 
127.3 
127.5 
134.7 


111.3 
125.6 
121.5 
109.1 
121.4 
120.4 
121.3 
126.8 
125.6 
118.4 


123.5 
139.6 
143.7 
160.7 
152.1 
133.7 
135.1 
137.0 
130.8 
138.2 


154.7 
163.2 
184.8 
169.0 
163.8 
156.0 
173.3 
144.8 
162.8 
150.3 


152.1 
163.3 
150.1 
143.7 
144.0 
185.3 
141.3 
148.4 
144.4 
146.2 


101.1 
124.5 




124.5 




118.7 




123.8 




121.8 




120.4 


Saskatoon-Regina. . . . 
Edmonton-Calgary. . . 


119.5 
119.5 
121.0 







N.B. — Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

(i) St. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



100 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



G — Strikes and Lockouts 

Statistical information on work stoppages in Canada is compiled by the Economics 
and Research Branch of the Department of Labour on the basis of reports from the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission. The first three tables in this section cover strikes and 
lockouts involving six or more workers and lasting at least one working day, and strikes 
and lockouts lasting less than one day or involving fewer than six workers but exceeding 
a total of nine man-days. The number of workers involved includes all workers reported 
on strike or locked out, whether or not they all belonged to the unions directly involved 
in the disputes leading to work stoppages. Workers indirectly affected, such as those laid 
off as a result of a work stoppage, are not included. For further notes on the series see 
page 103. 

TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1957-1962 





Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 


Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 


Month of Year 


Strikes and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in Man-Days 


Man-Days 


Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 


1957 


242 
253 
203 
268 
272 

24 
13 

20 
15 
30 
18 
23 
27 
24 
35 
23 
21 
29 


249 
262 
218 
274 

287 

49 
40 

40 
44 
46 
40 
45 
53 
47 
54 
48 
42 
49 


91,409 
112,397 
100,127 
49,408 
97,959 

11,059 
22,000 

9,174 
10,855 
12,426 
12,328 
17,333 
14,545 
16,775 
11,531 
10,482 
9,957 
9,565 


1,634,880 
2,872,340 
2,286,900 
738,700 
1,335,080 

122,100 
140,890 

85,420 

72,070 
143,800 
142,770 
139,700 
260,650 
133,650 

74,540 
116,350 
108,040 

76,740 


0.14 


1958 


0.24 


1959 


0.19 


1960 


0.06 


1961 


0.11 




0.11 




0.13 


•1962: January 


0.08 




0.07 




0.14 




0.14 




0.12 




0.23 




0.11 




0.07 




0.10 




0.10 




0.07 







Preliminary. 



TABLE G-2— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
BY INDUSTRY, NOVEMBER 1982 

(Preliminary) 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
BY JURISDICTION, NOVEMBER 1962 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Strikes 

and 

Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Days 




1 

4 
19 
15 

3 

7 


38 

3,900 

3,188 

1,890 

304 

245 


840 




8,430 




29,760 




34,950 


Transpn. and utilities. . . 
Trade 


550 
2,210 


Finance 












Public administration.. . 
















All industries 


49 


9,565 


76,740 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 

Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Days 




















5 


3,980 


8,510 






9 
23 

1 


2,270 

2,471 

36 


48,750 




14,790 




220 








1 
8 
2 


17 
516 
275 


640 


British Columbia 


3,290 
540 






All jurisdictions 


49 


9,565 


76,740 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



101 



TABLE G-4— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1962 



(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Union 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in 
Man- Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Employer 
Location 


Novem- Accu- 
ber mulated 


Result 


Mines 














Mineral Fuels 

Old Sydney Colliery 

Sydney Mines, N.S. 


Mine Workers Loc. 4535 
(Ind.) 


500 


500 


500 


Nov. 28 
Nov. 29 


Seniority rights~ Return of 
workers. 


Dominion Coal No. 12 and 

No. 18 Collieries, 
New Waterford, N.S. 


Mine Workers Locs. 7557 
and 4527 (Ind.) 


1,649 


4,120 


4,120 


Nov. 20 
Nov. 23 


Allocation of temporary em- 
ployees~ Return of workers. 


Dominion Coal No. 26 

Colliery, 
Glace Bay, N.S. 


Mine Workers Loc. 4520 
(Ind.) 


1,126 


2,250 


2,250 


Nov. 12 
Nov. 14 


Alleged unsafe working con- 
ditions~ Return of workers. 


Dominion Coal No. 18 

Colliery, 
New Victoria, N.S. 


Mine Workers Loc. 7557 
(Ind.) 


625 


1,560 


1,560 


Nov. 1 
Nov. 6 


Suspension of one worker~ 
Return of workers pending 
further discussions. 


Manufacturing 














Leather 

A. R. Clarke Co.. 

Toronto, Ont. 


Butcher Workmen 

Loc. 125L 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


200 


3,400 


21,200 


June 25 
Nov. 26 


Signing a first agreements 
Return of workers, agree- 
ment to be negotiated. 


Wood 

Tahsis Co., 
Tahsis, B.C. 


Woodworkers Loc. 1-85 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


300 


900 


900 


Nov. 28 


Discharge of one worker~ 


Primary Metals 

Quebec Iron & Titanium, 

Tracy, Que. 


Metal Trades' Federation 
(CNTU) 


745 


20,410 


67,730 


Aug. 28 


New agreement~ 


Metal Fabricating 

American Standard Products, 

Windsor, Ont. 


Auto Workers Loc. 195 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


138 


280 


5,390 


Sep. 10 
Nov. 5 


Seniority clause, wages, 
working conditions~Existing 
seniority clause excluded 
from new contract. 


Transportation Equipment 
York Gears, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Auto Workers Loc. 984 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


242 


120 


120 


Nov. 30 


Wages, hours ~ 


Non-Metallic Mineral 
Dominion Glass, 
Hamilton, Ont. 


Glass and Ceramic 
Workers Loc. 203 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


1,100 


2,200 


59,950 


Aug. 18 
Nov. 5 


Wages, fringe benefits~9$! an 
hr. Nov. 5, 1962, 5* Nov. 1, 
1963, hi Nov. 1, 1964; im- 
proved fringe benefits. 


Chemical Products 
Shawinigan Chemicals, 
Shawinigan, Que. 


CNTU— chartered local 


1,239 
(40) 


26,150 


100,030 


Aug. 17 


Management rights, job eval- 
uation seniority rights ~ 


Construction 

Five electrical contractors, 

Sarnia, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 530 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


317 


6,970 


17,770 


Aug. 8 
Dec. 3 


Vacation pay, wages~35?f an 
hr. increase on the basis of 
Ihi-hi-hi. yearly increases. 


Transpn and Utilities 














Transportation 
Various stevedoring 

companies,* 
Hamilton, Ont. 


I.L.A. Loc. 1654 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


135 


450 


450 


Nov. 7 
Nov. 12 


Disciplinary dismissal of 
three workers ~ Return of 
workers. 


Various stevedoring 

companies,* 
Hamilton, Ont. 


I.L.A. Loc. 1654 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


140 


90 


90 


Nov. 12 
Nov. 13 


Suspension of three workers 
~ Return of workers. 


Trade 
Tolhurst Oil, 
Pte-aux-Trembles, Que. 


Oil Workers Loc. 9-700 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


100 


600 


600 


Oct. 15 
Nov. 8 


Wages, hours~Wage in- 
crease, reduction in hours. 



'Federal jurisdiction. 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



102 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Technical Note to "G" Tables 



Statistical information on work stoppages in 
Canada is compiled by the Economics and 
Research Branch of the Department of Labour 
on the basis of reports from the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission. The first three tables in 
this section contain data covering strikes and 
lockouts involving six or more workers and 
lasting at least one working day, and strikes 
and lockouts lasting less than one day or 
involving fewer than six workers but exceeding 
a total of nine man-days. 

The developments leading to work stoppages 
are often too complex to make it practicable 
to distinguish statistically between strikes on 
the one hand and lockouts on the other. How- 
ever, a work stoppage that is clearly a lockout 
is not often encountered. 

The data on workers involved include all 
workers reported on strike or locked out, 
whether or not they all belonged to the unions 
directly involved in the disputes leading to 
work stoppages. Where the number of workers 
involved varied in the course of the stoppage, 
the maximum number is used for monthly totals, 
but adjustments are made for changes reported 
in the number of workers involved in work 
stoppages extending over two or more months. 
Workers indirectly affected, such as those 
laid off as a result of a work stoppage, are 
not included in the data on workers involved. 
Their number, however, if any, is shown in 
parentheses for the major work stoppages listed 
in Table G-4. The data in parentheses are 
those reported at an early stage of the work 
stoppage, and they refer only to the plant 
or premises at which the stoppage occurred. 

Duration of strikes and lockouts in man- 
days is calculated by multiplying the number 
of workers involved in each work stoppage by 
the number of working days the work stop- 
page was in progress. Where the number of 
workers involved varied significantly in the 
course of the stoppage, an appropriate adjust- 
ment is made in the calculation as far as this is 
practicable. The duration in man-days of 
all stoppages in a month or year is also shown 
as a percentage of estimated working time, 
based on the corresponding monthly figure or 
annual average figure for non-agricultural paid 
workers in Canada. The data on duration of 
work stoppages in man-days are provided to 
facilitate comparison of work stoppages in 



terms of a common denominator; they are 
not intended as a measure of the loss of 
productive time to the economy. For con- 
venience of expression, however, duration in 
man-days is on occasion referred to as "time 
loss" in reviews based on this series. 

The data on the distribution of work stop- 
pages by industry in Table G-2 follow the 
Standard Industrial Classification, D.B.S. (1960). 

In Table G-3 work stoppages are classified 
according to jurisdiction, whether federal or 
provincial. This is done on the basis of the 
governmental agency that intervened in the 
dispute. Where there was no such intervention 
the classification is, wherever possible, on the 
basis of the agency that previously dealt with 
labour matters in the establishment involved. 

Work stoppages involving 100 or more 
workers are listed in Table G-4, which shows 
in each instance the employer (s) and the 
location of the premises at which the work 
stoppage occurred, the union (s) directly in- 
volved or concerned in the dispute, number of 
workers involved, duration in man-days, starting 
date (the first day on which normal operations 
were affected) and termination date. For 
work stoppages that are terminated by mutual 
agreement, the termination date is usually the 
day on which work was resumed. Work stop- 
pages that have not been resolved in this way 
are as a rule considered terminated, for statis- 
tical purposes, at the date by which it was 
established that two-thirds or more of the 
workers involved had either returned to work, 
or had found work with other employers, or 
had been replaced by new employees; or the 
date by which it was reported that the opera- 
tions affected by the work stoppage would not 
be resumed. Also shown in Table G-4 are the 
major issues, as far as known, that led to 
work stoppage, and the result, i.e., the terms of 
settlement of major issues where a settlement 
was reached when the work stoppage ter- 
minated, or the circumstances in which the 
work stoppage came to an end. 

While the methods used to obtain data on 
work stoppages preclude the likelihood of 
major omissions, it is not always possible, 
particularly on a preliminary basis, to obtain 
precise information in detail. Consequently the 
information in this section may not be accurate 
in all respects. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1963 



103 



H — Industrial Accidents 

TABLE H-1-INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA DURING THE THIRD 
QUARTER OF 1962, BY GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES AND CAUSES 



Cause 


3 

"3 

60 
< 


M 

.5 
'& 

o 


60 
C 

m 


60 

'3 


60 

3 
O 

"3 

03 

s 


1 

to 
O 

O 


(0 

.2 

1 


u 

60 

03 

§1 

■3 oj 

II 

O 3 

&£ 
§£ 

^ o 
HO 


e 

EH 


o 
o 
c 

03 

s 


> 

CO 


T3 

1 
3 


3 

o 

H 




















Struck by 


1 


1 






1 

"5 

4 
4 

2 
11 
3 
5 
5 


2 
2 

7 
6 
8 










1 




6 






2 

12 
3 

1 




2 






6 






15 

1 
1 


3 






3 
1 
5 

6 
4 

1 
1 

1 

25 


.... 
1 


42 




7 
5 


1 
2 


3 
23 


1 

9 




28 




bl 


Falls and Slips 


3 










4 
3 

7 


9 

1 

2 

.... 


.... 


7 


2 




39 




1 

1 
2 






13 














16 








6 




1 




15 










2 












2 
42 




1 
36 






4 


Total Third Quarter 1962 


17 


18 


3 


32 


38 


10 


13 




235 






I 


1 





TABLE H-2-INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES, BY PROVINCE AND GROUPS OF 
INDUSTRIES, DURING THE THIRD QUARTER OF 1962 



Industry 


03 








i 


s 
O 


e 

oS 


1 


i 

< 




2 


3 

o 
H 






1 




1 


2 
1 


6 
2 




4 


3 






17 




1 
1 


14 




18 






2 
5 

1 
4 










3 




...... 


2 
6 

1 
3 

2 
2 


11 

22 

10 

3 

7 
2 


1 

3 
3 

1 


3 
...„. 

1 

3 


3 

2 
6 

1 

8 
1 


6 
7 
6 

12 
7 


i 


32 








42 








38 








10 


Transportation, Storage and Com- 


2 




1 


1 


36 


Trade 


13 
























1 

1 


11 


2 




2 


7 


2 


25 


Unclassified 










1 


Total 


5 


1 


13 


3 


21 


74 


10 


19 


26 


59 


4 


235* 








♦ Of this total 192 fatalities were reported by the various Workmen's Compensation Boards and the Board of 
Transport Commissioners; details of the remaining 43 were obtained from other non-official sources. 



104 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7963 



Transition from School to Work— p. 112 



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\o s 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 



R. M. Dyke 



Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 



Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
Miller Services, Toronto 



Vol. LXIII, No. 2 CONTENTS February 28, 1963 

Labour-Management Cooperation 1 06 

50 Years Ago This Month 107 

Notes ot Current Interest 108 

Transition trom School to Work 112 

Labour Developments in Canada in 1962 114 

World Labour Situation in 1962 117 

Committee of Inquiry info Unemployment Insurance Act 119 

Employment and Unemployment, January 123 

Latest Labour Statistics 124 

Indicative Programming in Western European Countries 125 

Facing Facts in Labour Relations 127 

Collective Bargaining: 

Major Settlements in 1962 129 

Collective Bargaining Scene 133 

Awards to Employers, Handicapped Man and Woman of Year 137 

U.S. National Council on the Aging 1 38 

Women in High Positions in U.S. Government 139 

International Labour Organization 140 

Teamwork in Industry 141 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 142 

Conciliation Proceedings 144 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 146 

Recent Regulations 151 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 156 

Monthly Report on Operations of the NES 1 57 

Decisions of the Umpire 157 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 160 

Prices and the Cost of Living 164 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 1 65 

LABOUR STATISTICS 169 



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64193-6—1 



Department of Labour Today 



Labour-Management Co-operation 



Labour-Management Committees, promoted by the Department, now number more than 
1,700 and represent more than 497,000 Canadian workers. Committees concern 
themselves with production problems, do not encroach on collective bargaining 



The number of Labour-Management 
Committees in Canadian industry is increas- 
ing. A report issued last month by the 
Department shows that at October 31, 1962 
more than 1,700 joint committees, repre- 
senting more than 497,000 workers, were 
operating in industry throughout Canada. 

The largest number of committees was 
in the manufacturing industries, where there 
were 1,131, representing 302,592 workers. 
In the manufacturing industries, 277 com- 
mittees, representing 84,178 workers, are in 
the iron and its products group; 116, 
representing 45,038, in pulp, paper and 
paper products. 

For other manufacturing industry groups, 
the number of committees and of workers 
represented on them are: 

Textile Products 43 11,237 

Rubber & Its Products 19 10,604 

Printing & Publishing 14 2,798 

Lumber & Its Products 77 11,135 

Edible Plant Products 82 17,102 

Leather & Its Products 19 4,430 

Edible Animal & Sea Prod- 
ucts 66 12,851 

Non-ferrous Metals & Their 

Products 54 18,673 

Clay, Glass & Stone Prod- 
ucts 80 16,879 

Non-Metallic Mineral Prod- 
ucts 23 4,217 

Tobacco Products 6 5,002 

Beverages 34 9,020 

Electric Light & Power 103 9,534 

Chemical & Allied Products 60 14,501 

Electrical Apparatus 45 23,000 

Miscellaneous 13 2,393 

There were 183 committees, representing 
63,866 workers, in the service industry, and 
160, representing 30,802 workers, in the 
communications industry. Committees and 
the number of workers represented on them, 
for other industries, are: 



Logging 4 

Mining 29 

Construction 4 

Transportation 152 

Trade 85 

Finance 1 



890 

8,361 

1,722 

80,052 

8,696 

334 



The 152 committees in the transportation 
industry are divided between railways, with 
110 committees representing 63,344 workers, 
and air transport, street railways and for- 
warding companies, where the 42 com- 
mittees represent 15,708 workers. 



Committees exist in all provinces. Ontario 
leads in the number of Labour-Management 
Committees with 755, representing more 
than 179,000 workers. But Quebec com- 
mittees, which number 449, represent nearly 
186,000 workers. 

In other provinces, the number of com- 
mittees and of workers represented on them 
are: 

British Columbia 141 24,895 

Alberta 121 35,281 

Manitoba 108 28,556 

Saskatchewan 97 15,005 

Nova Scotia 32 11,438 

New Brunswick 27 11,820 

Newfoundland 12 3,215 

Prince Edward Island 7 1,265 

More than 365,000 workers are repre- 
sented on 1,318 Labour-Management Com- 
mittees in which the participating unions are 
affiliated with the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress; 46,293 workers are represented on 
105 committees in which the participating 
unions are CNTU affiliates. 

Labour-Management Committees, which 
are promoted through the Labour-Manage- 
ment Co-operation Service of the Depart- 
ment, concern themselves with production 
problems, safety, good plant housekeeping 
and many other industrial activities. They 
do not deal with subjects covered by collec- 
tive bargaining. They are an effective line 
of communication between employer and 
employee. 

There is a growing conviction among 
leaders in government, management and 
labour that greater labour-management co- 
operation is necessary if Canada is to meet 
the challenge of international competition 
for the markets of the world, including our 
own home market. This challenge can be 
met effectively only by full labour-manage- 
ment co-operation at all levels. 

Officers of the Labour-Management Co- 
operation Service are available to unions 
and management to assist in the organiza- 
tion of joint committees and also to assist 
existing committees by providing technical 
assistance and printed material. The Service 
maintains branch offices in Amherst, N.S.; 
Montreal and Three Rivers, Que.; Toronto 
and Windsor, Ont.; Winnipeg, Man.; and 
Vancouver, B.C. 



106 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



From the Labour Gazette, February 1913 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Commission recommends setting-up of central statistical office for Dominion. 
B.C. Federation of Labour and TLC's Ontario executive ask their provincial 
governments to prohibit Orientals from employing white females in any capacity 



The report of a departmental commission 
appointed in May 1912 by Hon. George E. 
Foster, Minister of Trade and Commerce, 
to inquire into the statistics of Canada, 
which was tabled in the House of Commons 
in January 1913, was summarized in the 
Labour Gazette of February 1913. 

The report, according to the Gazette's 
summary, said that Canadian statistics as a 
whole lacked coherence and common pur- 
pose. To remedy this situation, the com- 
mission — one of the members was R. H. 
Coats, Editor of the Labour Gazette — 
proposed the setting-up of a central statis- 
tical office under the Dominion Government. 

This central office was to have the duty, 
first, of enlarging and co-ordinating the 
statistics issued under federal authority; and, 
later, of securing the co-operation of the 
provinces in correlating the whole field of 
statistics. 

The report suggested that the office 
should be primarily a "thinking office" for 
the whole Dominion. It was not to override 
or encroach upon purely departmental 
authority; but it was to be the main 
statistical agency for the Dominion. The 
commission thought that the several interests 
involved, which included federal Govern- 
ment departments and provincial agencies, 
were not diverse but common, and that a 
working plan for co-operation should be not 
only feasible but easy. 



Among the matters brought before the 
third annual convention of the British 
Columbia Federation of Labour (TLC) in 
Victoria in January 1913, the Gazette 
reported, was the result of a referendum 
vote on the question of the adoption by 
the Federation of the principles of socialism. 
This referendum had resulted in 1,718 votes 
in favour to 431 against. 

The executive committee in its report 
to the convention mentioned a number of 
demands that it had placed before the 
provincial Cabinet. The Federation had 
demanded: the eight-hour day and six-day 
week in all industries, the taking-over by 
the Government of the British Columbia 
telephone system, fortnightly payday in all 
industries, raising of the income tax exemp- 
tion to $2,000, a stop to subsidized immi- 
gration—especially through the Salvation 
Army — measures to deal with unemploy- 



ment, extension of the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act to all industries and all 
buildings regardless of height, an increase 
in workmen's compensation in case of 
death from $1,500 to $3,000 and in weekly 
indemnity from a maximum of $10 to a 
minimum of $10. 

The executive committee expressed its re- 
gret that the nominees of the Federation had 
not been given a place on the Royal Com- 
mission that had recently been appointed by 
the provincial Government to inquire into 
industrial conditions in British Columbia. 

Resolutions passed by the convention 
called for a number of amendments to the 
Coal Mines Regulation Act, including a 
provision compelling all employers to pro- 
vide baths for the use of their employees. 
Others proposed that six hours constitute 
a day's work underground, all piecework be 
abolished in mines, a minimum wage for 
miners be $4 a day, no person under 16 
years old be employed in or about a mine, 
and that Orientals be excluded from work- 
ing in or about a mine. 

A resolution was approved that urged 
legislation to ensure to all men whose 
occupation obliged them to live on com- 
pany-owned property the right to belong 
to a union of their own choice, to be visited 
by their lawfully elected officers, and to 
hold necessary union meetings and transact 
necessary union business. 

Legislation was also asked for that would 
prohibit Orientals from employing white 
females in any capacity, make it illegal to 
evict persons engaged in industrial disputes, 
prohibit the employment of private detec- 
tives within the province, and require wages 
to be paid in legal tender. 



In January 1913, the Ontario executive 
of the Trades and Labour Congress of 
Canada waited upon the Premier of the 
province and asked for legislation that, 
among other things, would: require pay- 
ment in legal tender of workmen employed 
on government or government-subsidized 
works; prohibit payment of wages by 
cheque; provide for the appointment of a 
provincial fair wage officer; stop the sub- 
sidizing of immigration; establish an eight- 
hour day in plants working 24 hours a day; 
and make it a criminal offence for Orientals 
to employ white girls. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

64193-6— 1£ 



• FEBRUARY 1963 



107 



Motes of Current Interest 



Open Classes in Skill Development 
To Upgrade Employed Persons 

A pilot project in a new co-operative 
educational scheme to prepare employed 
persons to meet the rapidly changing needs 
of industry was begun at Leaside, Ont., on 
January 28. Special classes opened for 30 
persons employed at three Leaside firms. 

The three companies — Sangamo Company 
Limited, Honeywell Controls Limited and 
Philips Electronics Limited — are co-operat- 
ing with unions, provincial and federal 
governments, and local school board officials 
in the project. It is the first time a group 
of employers has co-operated with govern- 
ment in the implementation of a program 
of basic training for skill development. 
Similar programs are being planned else- 
where in Ontario and in other provinces. 

The purpose of the six-month course is 
to upgrade workers in mathematics, science 
and English to a level where they can 
take further training and retraining in spe- 
cific skills. 

Ten employees from each company, while 
receiving full pay, will be allowed to leave 
work each day before 3 o'clock, five days a 
week for six months, to attend the courses, 
which run for three hours each day. In this 
way the company will be contributing li 
hours, and each employee will be contribut- 
ing the same amount of his own time. 

Trainees include both men and women, 
ranging in age up to 45, who have com- 
pleted Grades 8 or 9. The new courses are 
designed to raise their levels of attainment 
in mathematics, science and English by 
two or three school grades. 

The Ontario Department of Education has 
agreed to issue an equivalency certificate 
when a trainee completes a course. For 
example, a trainee who finishes Grade 10 
mathematics will receive a Grade 10 mathe- 
matics equivalency certificate. 

The courses will follow the regular high 
school curriculum with emphasis on the 
application of the subjects to an industrial 
setting. Special adult teaching techniques 
will be employed. 

The courses will be carried out under 
the direction of Harry Anderson, retired 
Vice-President of Sangamo, in rented quar- 
ters, although the Leaside School Board 
will make laboratories available for the 
courses. Two instructors have been retained 
for the program. 

The companies will pay the costs of the 
program but will be reimbursed by the 
province. In turn, the federal Government 



will share 50 per cent of provincial expendi- 
tures under Program 4 under the federal- 
provincial Technical and Vocational Train- 
ing Agreement. 

In addition to federal and provincial offi- 
cials, several persons participated in the 
planning and implementation of the pro- 
gram. They included Norman McLeod, 
Principal, Leaside High School; William C. 
Macready, Vice-Principal; Frederic Wise, 
Sangamo Company Lmited; William Towill, 
Honeywell Controls Limited; and F. Keith 
Richan, Philips Electronics Industries Ltd. 



Women's Bureau Revises Booklet 
On Vocational Training for Girls 

A revised edition of the Women's Bureau 
publication, Vocational and Technical Train- 
ing for Girls, has been issued. The revised 
edition replaces one issued a year ago 
(L.G., Jan. 1962, p. 96). 

"Just as the occupational world is chang- 
ing, so are opportunities for training. New 
schools at every level of instruction are 
being built in every province. New courses 
geared to the changing needs of the economy 
are constantly being introduced," the booklet 
says. 

The publication lists and describes the 
various courses of vocational and technical 
training suitable for girls that are offered 
by Canadan educational institutions at the 
high school, post high school and trade 
school levels. Many additional types of 
training relating to new occupational fields 
have been included in the revised edition. 
Photographs, provided by Institutes of Tech- 
nology, illustrate the various kinds of train- 
ing that girls are undergoing. 

Copies of the booklet may be obtained 
from the Queen's Printer, Ottawa, at 35 
cents each. 



Australia Has "Women's Bureau" 

The Minister of Labour and National 
Service for the Commonwealth of Australia 
recently announced the establishment of a 
new Women's Section within the Depart- 
ment. The chief function of the Section will 
be to expand and give more formal organ- 
ization to the research already being con- 
ducted by the Department into the eco- 
nomic and social problems affecting women 
workers. 

Miss Alison M. Stephen, formerly head 
of the Department's International Relations 
Section, has been appointed first Director 
of the Women's Section. 



108 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Department Issues Directory 
Of Canadians Studying in U.S. 

The Directory of Canadians Studying in 
the United States, 1962-1963, the sixth 
report in an annual series published by the 
Department of Labour, is now available. 
This directory is based on replies to a 
survey of students by the Department in 
1962, from a mailing list supplied by the 
Institute of International Education, New 
York, N.Y. 

To Assist Employers 

The main purpose of the directory is to 
assist Canadian employers in recruiting pro- 
fessional staff and, at the same time, pro- 
vide the means whereby the students who 
are listed in the Directory may find employ- 
ment in Canada after graduation. 

The 1962-63 directory contains informa- 
tion on about 350 undergraduate and 1,000 
postgraduate students. The undergraduate 
list includes only those students who expect 
to receive a bachelor's or first professional 
degree in 1963. The list of graduate students 
includes all respondents regardless of the 
year in which they expect to complete their 
studies. 

For each student, the following informa- 
tion is supplied: full name, year of birth, 
permanent mailing address, degree, univer- 
sity and field of study. Postgraduate thesis 
topics are shown where this information 
was supplied. 

6,273 Canadian Students 

The directory also contains a table show- 
ing the number of full-time Canadian stu- 
dents reported to be studying in American 
universities and colleges, by principal field 
of study, from 1956-57 to 1961-62. Registra- 
tions reported in the latter year were 
6,273, consisting of 4,084 undergraduate 
and 2,189 graduate students. 

Copies of the directory may be obtained 
free of charge by writing to the Economics 
and Research Branch, Department of La- 
bour, Ottawa 4, Ontario. 



Served in Department 30 Years, 
Harry Hereford Dead at 80 

Harry Hereford, M.B.E., for many years 
a senior official of the Department of 
Labour, died suddenly last month at the 
age of 80 years. 

At the time of his retirement in 1948 
he was Director of the Research and Statis- 
tics (now Economics and Research) Branch 
of the Department. 



During his 30 years with the Department, 
Mr. Hereford served in various capacities. 
He first joined the Department in 1918 
as General Superintendent of the newly 
established Maritime Employment Service. 
After a short period as Industrial Engineer 
of the Department, he was appointed Regis- 
trar of the Combines Investigation Act. In 
1930 he became Dominion Commissioner of 
Unemployment Relief, a post that he con- 
tinued to fill during the years of the 
Depression. 

When the Second World War began, Mr. 
Hereford was appointed Controller of Man- 
power Records, and later Special Assistant 
to the Deputy Minister, Chief Registrar for 
Canada and Director of Planning, National 
Selective Service. During this time he was 
also Secretary of the National Selective 
Service Advisory Board. 

MBE in 1943 

On June 3, 1943, he was made a Member 
of the Most Excellent Order of The British 
Empire (M.B.E.). 

After the war he was a member of several 
interdepartmental committees dealing with 
matters arising out of the war, and a 
delegate to several ILO conferences. 

After his retirement, he was assistant to 
the Director of the Canada Branch, Inter- 
national Labour Office from 1949 to 1957. 

One of Mr. Hereford's sons, Frank M. 
Hereford, is Director of the Special Services 
Branch of the Department. 




— Horsdal, Ottawa. 

Harry Hereford, M.B.E. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



109 



Domtar" Sponsors Own Labour-Management Seminar 

of training and retraining 



A two-day labour-management seminar, 
at Ste. Agathe, Que., in late November was 
sponsored by Dominion Tar & Chemical 
Company, Limited. The company negotiates 
120 separate collective agreements with 25 
national and international unions. 

Both labour and management spokesmen 
said the meeting was "highly profitable." 
Another is to be held by the company 
within six months. 

"Domtar" representatives had been pre- 
sent at a labour-management conference 
last March, sponsored by the National 
Productivity Council, at Queen's University, 
Kingston, and at the area labour-manage- 
ment committee conference the same month 
at Cornwall, Ont., sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Labour (L.G., June 1962, p. 595). 
As a result, the company decided to hold 
its own conference. 

At the Domtar seminar, the delegates on 
the first day thoroughly discussed the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Problems and questions concerning 
pension plans. 

2. Displacement of labour resulting from 
automation, obsolescence, technological 
changes and market changes. 

The discussion on labour displacement 
was divided into the following topics: 

— Advance information and consultation 
between the parties. 



— Methods 
workers. 

— The relocation of workers. 

During the second day of the seminar, 
the delegates undertook: 

1. An examination of developments in 
international trade patterns and their effects, 
and discussions on how to meet the chal- 
lenges posed by the European Common 
Market, the proposed trade program of U.S. 
President Kennedy, and other associated 
problems. 

2. A discussion entitled: "Information 
and communication and the mechanism for 
continuing consultation on matters of mu- 
tual interest." 

The seminar was under the chairmanship 
of Dr. John Deutsch, Vice-Principal of 
Queen's University. 

The company group, consisting of six. 
vice-presidents and managing directors, 
together with the heads of central staff 
departments, was led by W. N. Hall, 
President of Domtar. 

The 22-man labour group was jointly 
headed by William Dodge, CLC Executive 
Vice-President, and Jean Marchand, CNTU 
President. 

The federal Government was represented 
at the seminar by Gordon G. Cushing, 
Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour. 



N.S. Labour, Management Agree to Solve Own Problems 



An agreement on a program for develop- 
ing a new framework for labour-management 
relations in the province was reached in 
late November at a conference of Nova 
Scotia labour and management representa- 
tives called by the Institute of Public 
Affairs, Dalhousie University. 

Both parties agreed on the basic need for 
labour and management to solve their prob- 
lems without government intervention. 

The union delegates represented the Nova 
Scotia Federation of Labour (CLC) and 
the United Mine Workers of America (ind.). 
Management delegates represented 10 com- 
panies employing some 25,000 workers in 
key Nova Scotia industries. 

As guideposts for future relationships, 
the two parties agreed on these points: 



— A moratorium on further appeals to 
the Legislature for amendments to the 
Nova Scotia Trade Union Act, during which 
the parties themselves will explore all other 
avenues to improve mutual relations. 

— Organizing for collective bargaining 
is recognized as the workers' right, and the 
contribution that organized labour can make 
to the economy is recognized. 

— Unfair labour practices where em- 
ployees seek to organize under existing 
labour legislation are condemned by man- 
agement. 

— Management's right to a fair return on 
its investment is recognized by the unions. 

— Expansion of a joint labour-manage- 
ment study committee, set up last May. 

— A basic agreement establishing future 
relationships between the two parties is to 
be sought in further efforts. 



110 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Income Tax Cut Recommended 
By Chamber of Commerce 

The Executive Council of The Canadian 
Chamber of Commerce last month urged 
the federal Government to present a budget 
for the next fiscal year that will provide for 
"a substantial reduction" in the tax on 
corporate and personal incomes. This action, 
it was stated, would act as a stimulus to 
initiative and expansion of production and 
employment. 

In its annual pre-budget brief to the 
Ministers of Finance and National Revenue, 
the Council said the tax reduction should 
be regarded as an urgent interim measure 
pending a review of the whole tax system 
by the Royal Commission on Taxation. 

In addition to calling for tax cuts, the 
brief, while fully recognizing the limitations 
imposed by balance of payments and ex- 
change positions, supported a budget deficit 
in the next fiscal year as appropriate for 
the current economic situation. 

"The Executive Council is of the opinion," 
it was stated, "that a controlled budget 
deficit lower than this (fiscal) year with 
revenues cut by reduced taxes partially 
offset by curtailed current expenditures 
would enhance rather than impair con- 
fidence." 

With respect to government expenditures, 
the Chamber believes that costs of social 
welfare have reached the fiscally feasible 
limits and that "no extension of benefits can 
be considered in the present situation." 

There was a place, however, in the field 
of social capital for consideration of in- 
creased expenditures by all governments, as 
Canada has not yet caught up with the 
backlog of educational facilities and other 
urban community services required for the 
growing population. 

Among other things, the brief said: 

— Government economic policies which 
served in the postwar reconstruction period 
would have to be revamped to meet chang- 
ing circumstances in the light of Britain's 
proposed entry into the European Economic 
Community, President Kennedy's Trade Ex- 
pansion Program, and growing industrializa- 
tion in the underdeveloped countries; 

— The Canadian government must con- 
tinue to defend the exchange rate if it is 
to retain foreign confidence in the integrity 
of the country; 

— There was need for an economic cli- 
mate conductive to industrial expansion 
through appropriate commercial, fiscal and 
monetary policies which will make it profit- 
able for employers to hire more people 
and thus reduce unemployment. 



NUPE and NUPSE Agree on Terms 
Of Merger, Will Unite in Sept. 

The National Union of Public Employees 
and the National Union of Public Service 
Employees have agreed on terms of merger, 
it was announced last month by the Presi- 
dents of the two unions, William Buss of 
NUPE and Stanley Little of NUPSE. The 
merged union will be called the Canadian 
Union of Public Employees. 

The agreement was reached at meetings 
of a merger committee and a joint meeting 
of the two unions' Executive Boards. The 
terms will be submitted for approval at a 
founding convention in Winnipeg on Sep- 
tember 24 to 26. Each union will hold its 
final convention on the preceding day. 

Both unions are CLC affiliates. When 
they merge, the resulting union will be 
Canada's largest. NUPE, a former TLC 
affiliate, has 52,000 members; NUPSE, a 
former CCL affiliate, has 30,000. Predictions 
are that joint membership will reach 90,000 
by the time of the merger convention. 

The new union, CUPE, will have about 
500 locals across Canada. 



In Parliament Last Month 

{page numbers refer to Hansard) 

Parliament resumed on January 21, after 
recessing December 20 for Christmas. 

On January 21, the Prime Minister, in 
a statement on the business of the House 
during the coming session, stated that one 
of the items would be "a resolution to permit 
the introduction of an extensive bill to 
amend the provisions of the Railway Act, 
based on recommendations made by the 
MacPherson Royal Commission." He also 
said that "in due course" there would be a 
measure to amend the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act, "following the report of the Gill 
committee" (p. 2897). 

On January 22, Bill C-87, to provide 
for the establishment of a national eco- 
nomic development board, passed second 
reading, and the House went into committee 
upon it (p. 3020). The Minister of Labour 
tabled the bilingual texts of the instruments 
adopted at the 46th session of the Inter- 
national Labour Conference held in Geneva 
in June 1962 (p. 2979). 

On January 24, the Prime Minister an- 
nounced the appointment of the chairman 
and members of the Atlantic Development 
Board. He gave the name of the chairman 
as Brigadier J. Michael S. Wardell, news- 
paper publisher of Fredericton (p. 3080). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



111 



Transition from School to Work 



New bulletin in Training of Skilled Manpower Series is report of a research 
study of how a group of young people made the transition from school to work 



The Department of Labour has just issued 
a new bulletin, Transition from School to 
Work, which is a report of a research study 
of how a group of young people fared 
during the period of transition from school 
to work. The bulletin is No. 10 under the 
Research Program on the Training of Skilled 
Manpower. 

In the subject matter, in the method of 
research employed, and in the relationship 
of the authors to the sponsoring agency, the 
report marks a new departure in this series. 

Previous research under this program 
has been limited mainly to vocational educa- 
tion and specialized training of various 
kinds that takes place after young people 
leave secondary school. In this report the 
scope is extended to include the exploration 
of "the wide range of relationships between 
the formal educational system and the 
world of occupational experience." 

In the past, research has been undertaken 
either by the Department's research staff or 
by persons working under its direction. In 
this case, however, although the Department 
took part in planning the study and read 
the draft of the report, the actual execu- 
tion of the work and the deductions drawn 
from it were left entirely to the independent 
research workers employed for the project: 
Prof. Oswald Hall, Professor of Sociology, 
Department of Political Economy, Univer- 
sity of Toronto; and Prof. Bruce McFar- 
lane, Assistant Professor, Department of 
Sociology, Carleton University. 

The research project was a study of a 
community, fictitiously called "Paulend," and 
its purpose was twofold: "to report how 
Ontario educational institutions, at all levels, 
sort and sift the young people who are 
fed into them; and to inquire how these 
youngsters fare subsequently in finding 
places in the work world." 

The study was undertaken in 1961, the 
authors say in the introduction to the 
report, "as an attempt to trace the exper- 
iences of young Canadians in Paulend — a 
typical Ontario community — as they pass 
through the high school and enter the 
work world." The introduction continued: 

The initial plan was simple. We selected a 
community within which we tried to contact the 
people born in 1940. We studied the school 
records of these 21 -year-olds, to find out when 
they left school and what level they achieved 
in school. We related these facts to whatever 
else we could discover about the backgrounds 
of the students, such as sex, father's occupation, 
religion, experience with guidance, etc. 



Wherever possible we traced these students 
into the work world to discover their sequences 
of jobs and periods of unemployment. We 
interviewed everyone who could be contacted, 
and secured supplementary information about 
them from employers and the National Em- 
ployment Service. 

Wherever students had left the community 
subsequent to their high school careers, we 
traced them, when it was possible, hoping to 
compare the work careers of the foot-loose 
types with those who remained at home. Simi- 
larly, we contacted, wherever possible, the 
21-year-olds who had migrated into Paulend 
after terminating school careers elsewhere. 

The purpose of these inquiries was to find 
the answers to several questions: "Who gets 
where in the school system, and how? How 
are jobs found by newcomers to the work 
world? How is school achievement linked 
to job opportunities and to income? Who 
faces unemployment? How effective is 
guidance in the school system? Who pro- 
ceeds from high school to further education? 
Do boys and girls fare similarly in these 
matters? 

Some of the authors' findings simply con- 
firm the existence of problems articulated 
in previous research, the foreword says, but 
some of them "will come as somewhat of 
a surprise to many readers." The main 
findings follow. 

Progress in School 

In the Ontario high school system students 
drop out during all five years of the course, 
but the largest number drop out in Grade 
X, and another large group leaves in 
Grade XII. About one in five gets as far as 
senior matriculation (Grade XIII). About 
three quarters of the bright students (the 
top quarter of the school population) reach 
matriculation level, but only about a quarter 
of the dull ones (the bottom quarter) suc- 
ceed in doing so. In the middle half of 
the student body, an almost equal propor- 
tion drops out in each of the five years. 

Children from "white collar" homes stay 
at school longer than those from working 
class homes. The proportions that carry on 
to senior matriculation are 35 per cent for 
the former and 15 per cent for the latter. 

Generally speaking, boys and girls drop 
out in about the same proportions in each 
grade, but girls pass these grades at an 
earlier age than boys do. More boys than 
girls fall out of school, and more fail and 
repeat their grades. 

"Girls are more successful at passing than 
are boys," and even "in a strictly vocational 



112 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



school . . . the greater achievement of the 
girls stands out clearly." 

One of the conclusions reached by the 
authors of the study is that "the school 
system seems geared to the requirements 
of girls; boys fare badly in it — in all years 
and in both the academic and vocational 
courses." 

The authors say that at first they had 
looked on the work world "as one organized 
by men for men, with women invading it 
at various points." and on the school world 
"as fundamentally a co-educational world, 
offering roughly identical services to boys 
and girls." But during the research study 
they changed their views. 

The school world of Paulend, they re- 
ported, "turns out to be fundamentally a 
feminine world." 

It provides an academic atmosphere in which 
girls thrive and boys fail. The girls manage 
it with marked success at a relatively early age. 
The boys linger in it, showing conspicuously 
higher failure rates. It is a world to which 
girls adapt with relative ease. Boys appear to 
reject it, and eventually it rejects them. 

Moreover the school is a feminine world 
in the vocational sense. It prepares them admir- 
ably for their careers in the work world. The 
skills they learn are immediately transferable 
to the job world. Especially is this true for 
those who continue to university, those who 
prepare for school teaching and nursing, and 
those who enter clerical occupations. The 
skills learned in school seem ideally adapted 
for transfer to the job with little time delay. 

For the boys, it is otherwise. Those who 
drag along to senior matriculation are in many 
ways unfitted for university work. If they 
choose school teaching, they find themselves 
in a girls' world. If they head for a strictly 
masculine type of work, the skilled trades in 
industry, they find that their jobs have little 
connection with their prior schooling. There 
seem to be few places where skills learned by 
boys in school, even in vocational school, can 
be applied to a specific job. 

The contrast between boys and girls is 
indeed startling; the graduate of a stenography 
course can start work immediately as a full- 
fledged stenographer; the graduate of a four- 
year course in mechanics starts as an appren- 
tice. 

Moreover, the girl who fails to adapt to the 
requirements of a commercial course can drop 
out and register for a brief period in a business 
school from which she can step into a real 
job. The business school cushions her fall from 
the academic world. There are no comparable 
institutions which can help the boy step from 
his half-completed schooling into the enjoyment 
of a well-established job. 

Too, "our society provides much more 
in the way of specialized training facilities 
for girls than for boys," the authors state. 
"The two outstanding examples are our 
nursing schools and our teacher training 
colleges." 

Earlier the report had said "there appears 
to be a much closer correspondence between 
what the girls learn in the commercial 



courses and what they do at work than 
there is between what the boys learn in a 
technical or industrial course and what they 
do later." 

After Leaving School 

Beyond matriculation three main chan- 
nels open up for the student — nursing, 
elementary school teaching, and university, 
the report says. Approximately 10 per cent, 
10 per cent and 15 per cent respectively of 
those reaching Grades XII and XIII con- 
tinue along these lines. 

"Nursing is almost entirely a girls' field, 
teaching is preponderantly so; boys out- 
number girls in the university group. Nursing 
attracts a higher quality of high school 
graduate than does teaching. The boys 
going into teaching have notably poorer 
high school records than the girls have. 
The same holds true of the university con- 
tingent; a much larger proportion of the 
girls have completed high school work 
without failing a year in high school." 

Nursing is a highly favoured occupation 
for girls from both "non-manual" and 
"manual" families. "Nursing is not an easy 
course to take, but the profession is gener- 
ally considered to be an ideal one for 
girls," the report says. 

"Girls go into nursing because they want 
to be nurses . . . Nursing appears to be an 
end in itself, for it does not appeal through 
great financial rewards, nor as far as this 
sample was concerned, through high mobil- 
ity, either social or geographical." 

Finding Employment 

Regarding the ways in which young peo- 
ple find work on leaving school, the authors 
found that the most important, in the order 
given, were: personal contacts (including 
family and friends); finding one's own job; 
and passing from part-time work after 
school hours to full-time work after leaving 
school. 

They remark, however, that the extensive 
use of personal contacts for finding a job 
may be more prevalent in a community of 
the size of Paulend than in a large metro- 
politan area. 

The part played by schools and teachers 
in helping graduates to find jobs was found 
to be more important in the case of boys 
and girls who had completed a technical 
or commercial course than in the case of 
other students leaving school. They are able 
to place with relative ease those boys who 
have the qualifications necessary to embark 
on apprenticeship and other further training 
programs, and those girls with typing and 
other clerical skills. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 

64193-6—2 



113 



Referring to the part played by the 
National Employment Service, the report 
says that it provided 8 per cent of those 
who went to work with their first full-time 
jobs. "Among the boys it was most useful 
for those with poorer educational qualifica- 
tions who entered the work world at the 
semi-skilled and unskilled occupational 
levels. In the case of the girls, however, 
it appears to have been useful to both 
those seeking white collar jobs and those 
who entered at the unskilled manual work- 
er's level. 

"The National Employment Service, or 
'The Unemployment' as it is known among 
the youngsters interviewed, seems to be the 
place that the sample members went to 
after they had been working for some time, 
and were desirous of changing their jobs, 
or were laid off and seeking work." 

The authors found that on leaving school 
most young people found their first full-time 
jobs with little trouble, but many of these 
jobs did not last. A number suffered varying 
periods of unemployment. Sometimes the 
out-of-work period was simply time spent 
looking for "a better job." 

The boys experienced unemployment 
more than the girls, the report says, one 
half of them having been unemployed for 
some period during their relatively short 
working career, and one quarter having 
been unemployed for periods totalling more 
than three months. 

"It must be borne in mind, however, that 
20 per cent of the girls married and left 
the work world of business and industry . . . 
thus reducing a certain amount of the com- 
petition for jobs among the younger mem- 
bers of the female labour force." 

The report says that although lack of 
education did not have much effect in pre- 



venting young people from finding jobs 
when they left school, educational back- 
ground and the type of work which they 
found had a marked effect upon their 
pattern of subsequent employment. 

"In terms of continuous employment (that 
is, little or no unemployment), the girls 
of the sample had a decided advantage 
over the boys, and one of the most striking 
features of the material gathered in the 
interviews is the obvious ability of the girls 
to enter and leave the work world at 
will . . ." 

Vocational Guidance 

In a chapter on "Guidance," the authors 
concluded that "educational and vocational 
guidance" in the schools was ineffective. 

A common opinion among those inter- 
viewed was that guidance officers at schools 
had an unconscious bias in favour of their 
own occupation, teaching, apparently be- 
cause it was the only one they knew much 
about. 

A number of the respondents commented 
on the teachers' constant preoccupation with 
the qualifications required for the various 
occupations being discussed, rather than 
with the actual nature of the work carried 
out in the occupations. 

"The specific guidance services of the 
schools have left only a vague imprint on 
the vast majority of students passing through 
the high schools. Very few of the students 
had any awareness of the facilities of the 
National Employment Service in guiding 
the student into an appropriate niche in 
the work world. By and large the formal 
facilities for bridging the transition from 
school to work are ignored; students use 
their own initiatve and/or flounder in mov- 
ing from school to work." 



Labour Developments in Canada in 1962 

Production, employment and incomes rose substantially, and unemployment showed 
a further substantial decline in past year. Working conditions were improved 



During the past year, production, em- 
ployment and incomes in Canada have 
risen substantially. The main expansionary 
influences came from personal expenditures 
on goods and services, and from exports. 
Of some importance, too, was the increase 
in capital outlays being devoted to the 
expansion, modernization and renewal of 
the nation's productive facilities. At 7 per 
cent above those of 1961, the annual out- 
lays for non-residential construction are 



expected to be among the highest ever 
recorded. 

The level of housebuilding increased 
moderately over the year, partly because of 
a larger carry-over of uncompleted houses 
into 1962. Housing starts have been running 
somewhat ahead of the rate that was 
anticipated earlier in the year. This unex- 
pected strength will probably boost the 
total for the year somewhat above that of 
1961. During 1961, there was a substantial 



114 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



increase in the number of housing starts, 
but completions did not keep pace with 
those of the year before. 

Gross National Product in constant prices 
increased by 3 per cent from the fourth 
quarter of 1961 to the second quarter of 
1962 after rising 6 per cent between the 
first and fourth quarters of 1961. Among 
monthly measures of business activity, the 
industrial production index has followed 
an uninterrupted upward trend since the 
beginning of 1961 — the seasonally adjusted 
index in August was 5 per cent above its 
January level and 14 per cent above the 
cyclical low point in January 1961. 

Employment in the third quarter was 
2.8 per cent higher than a year earlier; 
it was 4 per cent higher in non-agricultural 
industries. In addition, short work weeks 
have been eliminated in many plants during 
the past year and substantial overtime has 
been worked in others. As a result, the 
average work week in manufacturing in 
the first seven months of the year was 
almost half an hour longer than for the 
comparable period of 1961, a clear indica- 
tion of the rise in industrial activity. 

Incomes of Canadians have kept pace 
with the higher levels of average hours and 
employment. Personal income in the first 
half of 1962 was 7 per cent higher than 
in the first half of 1961. The steady rise 
in income has given rise to a strong upward 
trend in sales. In the first eight months of 
the year retail sales were 5 per cent higher, 
in value terms, than in the corresponding 
period in 1961. 

Unemployment showed a further substan- 
tial decline during the past year, and by 
October was estimated at 283,000, which 
was 35,000 lower than a year earlier and 
85,000 lower than in October 1960. Virtually 
all of the drop was in male unemployment. 
But winter, as usual, brings seasonal unem- 
ployment in industries such as farming, 
construction and water transportation, and 
by December the unemployment estimate 
was 414,000, about the same as in Decem- 
ber 1961, although 114,000 lower than in 
December 1960. 

Total unemployment, however, is ex- 
pected to continue lower this winter than 
a year ago, and indications are that muni- 
cipal winter works projects will play an 
increasingly important role in stimulating 
employment in local areas. Since the Muni- 
cipal Winter Works Incentive Program was 
instituted by the Government in the fall 
of 1958, it has grown rapidly each year. 
The estimated number employed under it 
numbered only 42,000 in the first winter, 
but reached 147,000 in the winter of 1961- 
62. The estimated number of men to be 



employed on projects approved up to mid- 
January this year was 104,000. 

The combination of increasing job oppor- 
tunities and declining unemployment resulted 
in scarcities of workers last summer in 
specific occupations and areas, despite the 
fact that the over-all supply of labour was 
still plentiful. National Employment Service 
offices across the country have reported sub- 
stantial increases in job opportunities, but 
for many jobs qualified applicants were not 
available. This is particularly true of indus- 
trial centres, where there were marked 
shortages of qualified workers in a number 
of metal trades, and in several professional 
and technical occupations. 

This situation serves to point out the con- 
tinued need of education and training, and 
the need for a highly skilled labour force. 
Provincial governments, with the help of 
substantial federal grants, are making swift 
strides in expanding their technical and 
vocational training facilities to meet this 
need. And young Canadians are staying in 
school longer to take advantage of the 
educational opportunities available. 

The shortage of training facilities has 
eased considerably since the new Training 
and Vocational Assistance Act was enacted 
in December 1960. Under this Act, the 
federal Government will contribute 75 per 
cent of provincial government capital ex- 
penditures for technical and vocational 
training facilities until March 31, 1963, 
and 50 per cent thereafter. Another feature 
of the Act provides for a federal contribu- 
tion of 50 per cent of the cost of training 
persons who have left the secondary schools 
and for the training of teachers and adminis- 
trators. There is also a provision whereby 
the federal Government bears 75 per cent 
of the cost of training the unemployed. 

By early November 1962, the number 
of capital projects approved under this Act 
totaled 474, which will provide places for 
127,000 students. The total cost amounted 
to $442 million, of which the federal Gov- 
ernment's share was $285 million. 

Employment 

Total employment in 1962 averaged 168,- 
000 higher than in 1961. The increase was 
about equally distributed between men and 
women and was shared by all age groups. 

Manufacturing employment in the third 
quarter averaged 47,000 higher than in the 
same period in 1961; virtually all parts of 
the industry shared in the improvement. The 
most noticeable strengthening was in durable 
goods. The shipbuilding industry showed 
a marked improvement over the year. Also 
showing large gains over the year were the 
iron and steel, electrical apparatus, motor 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

64193-6— 2\ 



FEBRUARY 1963 



115 



vehicle and aircraft industries. Employment 
increases in non-durable goods industries 
were fairly general though less pronounced. 
The most marked improvement in this sector 
was in the apparel and rubber industries. 

The employment recovery in construc- 
tion played an important role in the year- 
to-year rise in job opportunities for men. 
Forestry employment was a little lower 
than the year before, but mining showed 
little or no change. Employment in agricul- 
ture continued its secular decline, falling 
13,000 over the year in spite of a sub- 
stantially higher level in the Prairie region. 

From January to October, employment in 
the service industry rose by 6 per cent. 
The largest gains were in community and 
personal service. Trade was the only service- 
producing industry which failed to show a 
year-to-year increase in employment. 

The improvement in transportation was 
of some significance. Under the stimulus of 
increased trading with foreign countries and 
a sharp upward trend in the volume of 
shipments of raw materials and manufac- 
tured goods to Canadian producers, employ- 
ment in the industry in the third quarter 
advanced by 23,000, or 4.3 per cent over 
the third quarter of 1961. At no time 
during the past decade had the industry 
shown any noticeable signs of growth. The 
conversion of diesel locomotives had a 
dampening effect on railway employment 
during much of the period, and this develop- 
ment offset employment gains in other parts 
of the transportation industry. 

Unemployment 

At 283,000, unemployment in October 
was 4.3 per cent of the labour force. A year 
earlier the rate was 4.9 per cent and in 
October 1960 it was 5.7 per cent. By 
December, however, unemployment was vir- 
tually the same as in December 1961, and 
the rate was 6.3 per cent of the labour 
force compared with 6.4 per cent the year 
before; in December 1960 it was 8.2 per 
cent. 

Unemployment rates in December were 
significantly lower than the year before 
in Ontario and the Prairie region, and 
somewhat higher in the Atlantic region and 
Quebec. In British Columbia the rate was 
virtually the same as a year earlier. 

The stronger demand for labour benefited 
workers of all age groups, but particularly 
the 25-44 year age groups. As usual, the 
incidence of unemployment was greater 
among young people than it was among the 
experienced members of the labour force. 
In December the number of unemployed 
in each age group, as a percentage of the 
labour force, varied from just over 12 per 



cent in the 14-19 year age group to 5 
per cent for those over 25. 

Some 358,000 of the 414,000 unemployed 
in December were men and 56,000 were 
women; 72,000 were teen-agers. 

The decline in the number of unem- 
ployed men during the past year can be 
attributed largely to increased employment 
in durable goods manufacturing and con- 
struction. The number of unemployed 
women showed little change over the year 
despite a substantial increase in women's 
employment. As in earlier years, women, 
particularly married women, entered the 
labour force in large numbers in response 
to strong demands for female workers in 
the service industry. 

Wages and Working Conditions 

The average of weekly wages and salaries 
of non-farm workers in Canada was $80.88 
in July 1962, an increase of $2.64, or 3.4 
per cent, from July 1961. This was a 
greater rate of increase than in the previous 
year and represents a gain in real average 
earnings of nearly 2 per cent. 

All major industrial groups in the econ- 
omy shared in the increase of weekly 
wages and salaries achieved between July 
1961 and July 1962. Earnings in manu- 
facturing, construction, public utilities and 
trade increased at approximately the same 
rate as the industrial average. In mining, 
forestry, and finance, insurance and real 
estate, the increase in wages and salaries 
was above the average rise for all indus- 
tries; it was slightly less than average in 
the transportation, storage and communica- 
tion industry, where weekly earnings rose 
by somewhat more than 2 per cent, and in 
the service industry, where the rise was 
3 per cent. The largest increase was recorded 
in British Columbia, where employees im- 
proved their earnings by more than 4 per 
cent. 

Over the past decade or so, improved 
working conditions in Canadian industry 
have provided workers with an over-all 
reduction in the work-year as a result of 
reductions in the standard work-week and 
extensions of annual paid statutory holi- 
days and vacations. 

A survey of working conditions in Cana- 
dian manufacturing industries shows that 
in 1962 more than 70 per cent of plant 
workers were employed in establishments 
with a standard work-week of 40 hours or 
less, compared with 25 per cent in 1949. 

Over the same period, at least two weeks 
vacation has become practically universal. 
In addition, the proportion of plant workers 
entitled to three weeks annual paid vaca- 
tion, after varying years of service, has 



116 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



been increased to seven out of ten plant 
workers from three out of ten in 1949. 
There has also been a steady increase in 
the number of long-service employees who 
are entitled to a fourth week after 25 or 
more years of service — 27 per cent in 1962 
contrasted with only 2 per cent a decade 
ago. 

In the past decade, the proportion of 
plant workers entitled to eight or more 
statutory holidays annually has increased 
from 35 per cent to nearly 75 per cent. 

Trade union membership in Canada 
dropped slightly during 1961, and at the 
beginning of 1962 there were 1,423,000 
union members in Canada, of whom 
1,049,000 were members of the Canadian 
Labour Congress. About 30 per cent of 
the non-agricultural paid workers belong 
to labour organizations. 

During the first half of 1962, more than 
120 major collective agreements — those 
covering bargaining units of 500 or more 
employees — were negotiated in all industrial 
sectors except construction. These agree- 
ments covered approximately 202,600 work- 
ers across Canada. 

Slightly more than 30 per cent of the 
settlements were for one year's duration, 



another 40 per cent were two-year con- 
tracts and approximately one-quarter were 
for a three-year period. 

More than half of the one-year settle- 
ments provided for base rate increases of 
4 or 5 cents an hour, the latter being the 
more common. Of the major two-year 
settlements, close to one-half increased base 
rates by 10 to 13 cents an hour and the 
majority of the three-year agreement pro- 
vided for wage increases ranging from 10 
to 20 cents an hour over the life of the 
contract. 

Nearly all of the collective agreements 
were concluded without recourse to strike 
action, and the proportion of working time 
lost due to work stoppages was estimated 
at one tenth of 1 per cent in the first ten 
months of the year. The most extensive 
strikes during 1962 were in the automobile 
manufacturing industry in Ontario and the 
trucking industry in both Ontario and 
Quebec. 

— Prepared jointly by Employment and 
Labour Market Division, and Labour 
Management Division, of the Economics 
and Research Branch, Department of 
Labour. 



World Labour Situation in 1962 

IL0 survey finds that workers in the industrialized countries had a relatively 
good year. But in the less-developed countries there was little improvement 



Workers in the industrialized countries 
had a relatively good year in 1962, data 
assembled by the International Labour 
Office shows. 

Employment was at record levels, unem- 
ployment declined almost to the vanishing 
point in some European countries that were 
facing growing labour shortages, and money 
wages generally increased faster than con- 
sumer prices. 

In the less developed countries, however, 
the available information suggests that there 
has been little improvement in the welfare 
of workers, as employment has not kept 
pace, with the growing labour force and 
price increases have outstripped gains in 
wage rates. 

The number of persons employed reached 
r:cord levels in 1962 in practically all 
industrialized countries. Employment in 
manufacturing, which had decreased in a 
few countries in 1961, was again on the 
increase everywhere, except in Sweden, in 
Argentina, where it has been decreasing 
since 1955, and in the United Kingdom, 



where manufacturing employment decreased 
by 1 per cent, although the general level 
of employment remained at about the same 
level as in 1961. Employment in agriculture 
and in mining continued its long-term 
decline. 

Except for the United Kingdom, unem- 
ployment decreased in all industrialized 
countries, in some cases to the lowest figures 
on record. Unemployment in Canada and 
in the United States, which had reached a 
postwar peak in 1961, has been decreasing 
steadily, although slowly, since late 1961. 
Several European countries were suffering 
from labour shortages. 

But the employment situation in the 
economically less well developed countries 
was not encouraging. In most of these coun- 
tries a serious problem of unemployment 
and underdevelopment still exists, and in 
many instances is becoming more acute. 

Consumer prices increased slightly more 
in 1962 than in each of the last four years, 
although the rate of increase remained 
modest in most cases. Marked inflationary 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



117 



trends were evident, however, in several 
of the economically less well developed 
countries. 

The most recent data from 24 reporting 
countries, most of which are industrialized, 
indicate that average hourly earnings in 
manufacturing generally increased, the in- 
crease exceeding 10 per cent in nine coun- 
tries. In most cases, gains in nominal 
wages more than offset price increases. 
Owing to slight reductions in hours worked, 
weekly earnings sometimes progressed less 
than hourly wages. 

The number of working days lost through 
industrial disputes in 1962 was somewhat 
higher than in 1961, but remained at an 
average level compared with other postwar 
years. Days lost through disputes in Canada, 
Italy and the United Kingdom were much 
more numerous than in 1961. Some coun- 
tries, notably Japan, reported sizable declines 
in the impact of work stoppages. 

Employment 

In Australia, Canada, the Republic of 
South Africa and the United States, the 
increases in manufacturing employment in 
1962 contrasted with the decreases observed 
from 1960 to 1961. In Canada and the 
United States, the number of employees 
in manufacturing had by late 1962 recovered 
to the high levels of 1956-57. 

Employment in agriculture generally de- 
creased; the downward trend was par- 
ticularly notable in the Federal Republic 
of Germany, France, Italy, Norway and 
Sweden. 

Unemployment 

In the Federal Republic of Germany, 
the number of registered unemployed con- 
tinued to decline in 1962. In Italy, the 
number of unemployed was down to 483,000 
or 2.3 per cent of the labour force. In 
Belgium, the November 1962 figure of 
65,650 unemployed was the lowest Novem- 
ber figure reported since 1947. In Ireland, 
the number of applicants for work fell in 
1962 to the lowest level ever observed. The 
number of unemployed on relief in France 
was down to 19,000 in late 1962. 

Unemployment practically disappeared in 
Switzerland and in Luxembourg. 

Most of the industrialized countries of 
Europe suffer from labour shortages. 

Unemployment in the United Kingdom 
decreased from 1959 to 1961 but, in con- 
trast to the pattern of the other industrialized 
countries, began to increase in September 
1961 and has continued its upward move- 
ment. In November 1962, the number of 
persons wholly unemployed or temporarily 
laid off was 37 per cent above the figure for 



November 1961. With 579,000 unemployed, 
the United Kingdom was witnessing its 
highest unemployment in November since 
1940. 

Unemployment in Canada and in the 
United States increased from 1959 till Feb- 
ruary 1961, when it reached a peak of 
719,000 (or 11.3 per cent of the labour 
force) in Canada and 5,705,000 (or 8.1 
per cent of the labour force) in the United 
States. After the seasonal decline from 
February to mid-year, which still left unem- 
ployment at higher levels than 12 months 
earlier, the trend was reversed, and, from 
September 1961 in Canada and November 
1961 in the United States, the monthly 
number of persons unemployed started to 
drop below the number reported for the 
same month in the previous year. Since 
then, for each month the number of unem- 
ployed has been lower than that of the 
corresponding month a year earlier. Despite 
this regular decline, however, unemploy- 
ment in both countries in November 1962 
was still higher than in November 1959. 

Consumer Prices 

The increases in consumer prices ex- 
ceeded 10 per cent in 10 of the 95 countries 
surveyed: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 
Dominican Republic, Ghana, Greenland, 
Indonesia, Israel and Uruguay. Increases 
were between 5 and 10 per cent in 15 
others: Algeria, Angola, Colombia, Den- 
mark, Finland, Grenada, Iceland, Italy, 
Laos, Morocco, Poland, South Korea, Spain, 
Sudan and Yugoslavia. 

Retail price levels went up by only 2 
to 5 per cent in 30 countries and remained 
practically unchanged in 40 countries. 

Wages and Real Earnings 

Increases in nominal wages in manufac- 
turing varied greatly from one country 
to another, e.g., from 0.3 per cent in 
Australia to 26.2 per cent in Argentina. 
Gains in real wages were reduced as a 
result of the continued upward movement 
of consumer prices. Nevertheless, real wages 
increased by more than 5 per cent in nine 
of the countries for which data are avail- 
able, by less than 2 per cent in six coun- 
tries. In Argentina, New Zealand and 
Poland, the purchasing power of the work- 
ers' incomes decreased during the year. 

Industrial Disputes 

In Italy, the number of days lost in 
industrial disputes in the first eight months 
of 1962 was about double that in the 
corresponding period of 1961. In the United 
Kingdom also, the loss of 5.6 million 
working days in the first ten months of 



118 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



1962 represented about twice the number 
of days lost in the corresponding period of 
1961. 

The 19 million days lost through disputes 
in the United States in 1962 represented an 
increase of 17 per cent over 1961. In 
Canada, half a million more man-days 
were lost from January to September 1962 
than from January to September 1961, an 
increase of 70 per cent. 

Belgium, the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many, New Zealand and Pakistan all re- 



ported substantial increases in the number 
of days lost through disputes but the impact 
was relatively slight, as the total number 
of days lost in 1962 in the four countries 
combined was well below one million. 

The number of days lost decreased 
in several countries, including Australia, 
France, Japan and The Netherlands. Japan 
reported a decline of more than a million, 
or 25 per cent, in the number of days lost 
in the first six months of 1962 as compared 
with the first half of 1961. 



Report of Committee of Inquiry 

into Unemployment Insurance Act 

Gill Committee recommends three-part plan of support for unemployed: a plan 
based on insurance principles, one for extended benefits when regular benefit 
exhausted and when worker normally seasonally unemployed, and assistance plan 



A scheme of support for the unemployed 
consisting of three parts was recommended 
by the committee of inquiry into the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act, under the chair- 
manship of Ernest C. Gill. The committee's 
report was released late in December. 

The three parts are: 

1. An insurance plan, supported by con- 
tributions from employees and employers, 
that would provide benefit for a limited 
period of unemployment. 

2. A plan, supported from general taxa- 
tion revenues, that would pay extended 
benefits to persons who had exhausted their 
regular benefits and, subject to certain con- 
ditions, to persons for whom unemployment 
ordinarily follows a seasonal course. 

3. A plan of assistance to provide for 
the residue of unemployed persons not 
covered by the first two plans, to be 
administered on a needs-test basis by local 
authorities in a manner suitable to local 
circumstances. 

Among the important innovations recom- 
mended by the committee were: 

— Coverage under the unemployment in- 
surance plan should apply to all persons 
over the age of 18 years "occupying the 
employee side of an employee-employer 
relationship," without regard to the amount 
of income being earned or to the risk of 
unemployment. 

— The maximum benefit period under the 
regular unemployment insurance plan (the 
first of the three mentioned above) would 
be 26 weeks, instead of the present 52 
weeks. 



— The rate of benefit should be 60 per 
cent of the insured wage for claimants 
with a dependant, instead of the present 
50 per cent. For claimants without a 
dependant, the benefit would be about 45 
per cent of earnings. 

— The "allowable earnings" that a claim- 
ant drawing benefit may earn without being 
subject to a reduction in his benefit would 
be reduced to about a quarter of the maxi- 
mum benefit, instead of half, as at present. 

— Seasonally unemployed workers whose 
record shows that such unemployment is a 
recurring feature of their work would not 
be covered under the regular unemployment 
insurance plan. With certain limitations, 
however, they would be eligible for extended 
benefits under the second plan. 

— Fishermen would come under a special 
plan for payment of off-season benefit. This 
plan would be administered by the Depart- 
ment of Fisheries. 

In introducing its recommendations, the 
committee said: "First and foremost, we 
place great emphasis on the positive solu- 
tions to the problem of unemployment. 
There is no system of unemployment insur- 
ance that can cope with heavy and prolonged 
unemployment in a manner that is at the 
same time financially practicable and socially 
defensible." 

Proposed Insurance Plan 

The regular unemployment insurance plan 
proposed by the committee would be "based 
on insurance principles appropriate to such 
a social insurance plan." Applying to all 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



119 



persons over the age of 18 years, coverage 
would be extended to include employees of 
federal, provincial and municipal govern- 
ments, employees earning more than the 
present limit of $5,460 a year, employees 
of hospitals and charitable institutions, and 
teachers. 

Coverage would be withdrawn from self- 
employed fishermen, and persons under 18 
years old. Employees in agriculture and 
domestic service, because of administrative 
problems, would continue to be excluded, 
but efforts should be made to overcome 
these difficulties and devise means of bring- 
ing these employees under the plan. 

Existing exceptions founded on the dan- 
gers of abuse should be continued and 
extended to include: all family employment, 
paid or unpaid; employees using important 
equipment of their own; persons in casual 
employment; and officers and directors of 
corporations, where the Unemployment In- 
surance Commission is satisfied that their 
position practically amounts to self-employ- 
menjt. Members of the armed forces and 
of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 
would continue to be excluded. 

The unemployment insurance plan would 
be financed by equal contributions from 
employees and employers. The Government 
would not contribute, but would bear the 
cost of administration. 

Contributions 

Contributions would be revised to provide 
that when an employee works for a par- 
ticular employer for less than a full work 
week, the earnings class would be deter- 
mined in conformity with the employee's 
rate of earnings for a full week, and the 
contribution required would be a fifth of 
a full week's contribution or each day 
worked. 

Existing contribution rates would be con- 
tinued until a suitable reserve fund had 
been established, and until experience had 
shown that a reduction in rates could be 
made without endangering the financial 
solvency of the plan. 

Present methods of collecting and record- 
ing contributions would be retained, but 
efforts should be continued to extend the 
bulk-pay system as far as possible. 

Qualification for Benefit 

The record of attachment to insured 
employment required to enable an insured 
person to qualify for benefit would be 
expressed in full weeks of employment or 
contribution, with partial weeks being con- 
verted to full weeks at the rate of five 
days to a week. 



Attachment to insured employment re- 
quired to establish a benefit period should 
be at least 30 full weeks in insured employ- 
ment in the two years preceding the claim. 
At least 20 of these weeks should have 
occurred in the year preceding the claim, 
and since the beginning of the last preceding 
benefit period, if any. 

Benefits 

The maximum benefit in any one benefit 
period would be one full week of benefit 
for each two weeks of contribution in the 
year preceding the claim and since the 
beginning of the last preceding benefit 
period. The maximum benefit period would 
be 26 weeks. 

A program should be adopted of stricter 
examination of claims and of cases in which 
the claimant has been referred to job 
openings without result, in order to reduce 
abuses of the plan by persons who are not 
genuinely seeking employment. 

A woman whose employment terminates 
by reason of pregnancy would be considered 
to be not available for employment until 
eight weeks after confinement; if her em- 
ployment terminates for any other reason, 
a pregnant woman would be considered 
unavailable for employment for eight weeks 
before, and eight weeks after confinement. 

A woman who has children below school 
age under her care would be considered 
unavailable for employment unless she can 
prove that she has made satisfactory 
arrangements for the care of the children 
should she receive an offer of employment. 

A pension received on retirement under 
an employer-employee pension plan, and 
income payments given as indemnity for a 
temporary period for lost wages under 
workmen's compensation plans or a sickness 
or disability plan, would be treated as earn- 
ings for purposes of determining benefit 
payments. 

Payments made to employees on termina- 
tion of employment, such as bonuses, gra- 
tuities, severance pay, holiday pay, or other 
credits, would be treated as earnings in 
determining benefit payments. 

Supplementary unemployment benefits 
paid by an employer would be treated as 
earnings for the purpose of computing 
benefit under the unemployment insurance 
plan. 

Greater efforts should be made to find 
out whether earnings are being concealed 
and whether a claimant is really available 
for employment. 

If a claimant is disqualified because he 
has voluntarily terminated his employment 
or because he has refused a suitable offer 
of employment, the benefit entitlement 



120 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



period should be reduced by the length of 
the period of disqualification. It should not 
be merely delayed, as at present. 

The Unemployment Insurance Commis- 
sion should undertake a vigorous campaign 
to impress on employers the importance 
of accurately reporting reasons for termina- 
tion of employment. It should also use the 
power it now has to prosecute employers 
who can be proved to have given false 
information. 

When a claimant has been directed to a 
training course, the unemployment insurance 
benefit should be stopped, and a training 
allowance should be granted instead under 
the general vocational training program. 

Refusal to cross picket lines in connection 
with a labour dispute would be taken as 
evidence of taking part in the dispute, 
regardless of the reason given for such 
refusal. When workers of a given grade or 
class participate in a labour dispute at a 
particular premises by refusing to cross 
picket lines, such refusal would be con- 
sidered as participation in that dispute by 
all workers of that grade or class throughout 
the territory covered by the agreements to 
which the original dispute relates. 

The balance in the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Fund not needed to meet current bene- 
fit payments should be invested from time 
to time in securities especially issued for 
the purpose by the Government of Canada, 
such securities to be redeemable at par 
on 30 days' notice, and carrying a rate of 
interest about equal to the market rate 
at date of issue on a three-year government 
security. 

In setting forth its views regarding an 
unemployment insurance scheme, the com- 
mittee said: 

So far as unemployment insurance is con- 
cerned, it appears possible to predetermine an 
appropriate premium to cover losses arising 
from more or less normal short-term unemploy- 
ment. However, losses arising by reason of 
general unemployment in times of economic 
depression cannot be predicted in any reliable 
fashion, or in any such fashion as would make 
it feasible to prescribe and collect premiums 
in advance designed to meet the entire wage 
loss, or even any reasonable proportion of it. 
Similar comments apply with respect to long- 
term unemoloyment arising in any individual 
case . . . Thus it appears that the application 
of insurance principles to unemployment insur- 
ance requires that the plan undertake to indem- 
nify only in respect of reasonably short-term 
unemployment within some more or less pre- 
dictable range. 

For this reason, the committee said, its 
recommendations "would result in the insur- 
ance plan bearing the first impact of unem- 
ployment, but the first impact only. The 
insurance plan would not be concerned with 
unemployment that has extended beyond 



a reasonably short period, or unemployment 
that occurs in a repetitive seasonal pattern." 

Proposed Extended Benefits Plan 

Eligibility for extended benefits under the 
second of the plans proposed by the com- 
mittee would be limited to persons who 
have recently established a benefit period 
under the first plan, and have either 
exhausted their insurance benefit or have 
been disqualified by reason of the seasonal 
regulations. 

No benefits would be paid under the 
second plan to persons 70 years of age or 
over who are getting a pension under the 
Old Age Security Act, to persons under 18 
years of age, or to married women who 
are not the sole support of their house- 
holds. 

The maximum period of extended benefits 
would be one and a half times the period 
of insurance benefit to which the claimant 
was entitled in his preceding benefit period, 
and eligibility for such benefits would begin 
as soon as the benefit period under the first 
plan ended. 

The rate of benefit under the extended 
benefit plan would be same as the rate 
the claimant was entitled to under the first 
plan during his last preceding benefit period. 

Claimants who are now entitled to sea- 
sonal benefit, and who would not be so 
under the first of the proposed new plans, 
would be able to draw extended benefits 
under the second plan during the off-season, 
subject to all the other rules applying to 
extended benefits. 

No extended benefits, however, would be 
paid to persons who had a record of 40 or 
more full weeks of insured employment 
during the 52 weeks preceding the claim, 
because "any person who has a seasonal 
pattern of 40 complete weeks of employ- 
ment, or more, can reasonably be expected 
to carry through the remainder of the year 
on his own resources." Those with fewer 
than 40 weeks of insured employment would 
be able to draw benefit only for the number 
of weeks represented by the difference 
between 40 and the number of weeks they 
had worked in insured employment during 
the 52 weeks preceding the claim. A person 
who had worked 39 weeks would, for exam- 
ple, be entitled to only one week's benefit. 

The report recommended that "the opera- 
tion of the plan of extended benefits be 
accompanied by increased emphasis on the 
vigorous development of the National Em- 
ployment Service, on the problem of adjust- 
ment to technological changes, on retraining 
programs, and on problems of occupational 
and industrial shifts, and on all other 
matters falling within a comprehensive 
national employment program." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



121 



A claimant under the extended benefits 
plan would be required to accept employ- 
ment of which he was reasonably capable, 
whether it was his customary employment 
or not. 

The second plan would begin where the 
first left off. "The main purpose of the 
plan of extended benefits would be to 
assume the burden of unemployment that 
has extended beyond the period that can 
properly be dealt with on an insurance 
basis." But, the report goes on to say, "the 
operation of such a plan would be accom- 
panied by bringing to bear the full effort 
of a national employment program on the 
problems that are causing this extended 
unemployment." 

The committee said it had given con- 
sideration to the possibility of a program 
of support for the unemployed consisting 
of only two parts: an insurance plan and 
a needs-test assistance plan. "But, in our 
view, an intermediate plan is necessary. 

"In the absence of an intermediate plan, 
the inevitable results will be either pressure 
on the insurance plan to try to make it 
assume more and more of the load; or an 
additional burden on the assistance plan 
beyond the administrative capacity of exist- 
ing organization, and beyond the financial 
ability of some of the provinces and muni- 
cipalities that share in the cost. 

"We believe that the present difficulties 
of the unemployment insurance plan are 
to a considerable extent the result of efforts 
to stretch the plan to cover cases and 
provide benefit that should not have been 
swept within an insurance plan, but were 
beyond the capacity of the existing assist- 
ance plans. 

"We believe that by instituting a plan 
of extended benefits along the lines that we 
. . . outline, the insurance plan will be 
enabled to maintain its validity as an insur- 
ance undertaking, the assistance plans will 
not be swamped with additional claims, and 
attention can be focussed on unemployment 
that has reached a serious or chronic stage." 

Third Proposed Plan 

Efforts should continue to be made, the 
committee says, "to improve and develop 



existing assistance plans operated on a 
needs-test basis to enable them to deal 
effectively with residual unemployment." 

National Employment Service 

The committee recommended that the 
National Employment Service be transferred 
to the Department of Labour. It regarded 
this as "a necessary move to co-ordinate 
efforts relating to manpower policy and em- 
ployment programs." It also recommended 
that the NES, through its local offices, 
should act as an agency for the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission. 

The Unemployment Insurance Commis- 
sion would be responsible for administering 
the unemployment insurance plan and the 
extended benefits plan, subject only to an 
arrangement with the NES by which the 
latter would act as its agent in local offices 
of the NES. The Unemployment Insurance 
Commission also would Mft appoint chair- 
men of boards of referees. 

Power should be restored to the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission, the com- 
mittee recommended, to prosecute employers 
for default in payment of contributions. 

Steps should be taken to raise the stand- 
ard of education and training of the staff 
of the UIC and the NES, and to increase 
the scale of salaries paid to them. The 
committee also recommended that the build- 
ings and equipment of the local offices of 
the NES should be improved. 

Advisory Committee 

The Unemployment Insurance Advisory 
Committee should continue to be respon- 
sible for watching over the financial sol- 
vency of the Fund, and the committee 
should be made up of representatives of 
employers and employees appointed by the 
Government from panels nominated by in- 
terested organizations, possibly supplemented 
by members representing the public. Rec- 
ommendations of the Advisory Committee, 
the Gill report said, should be either 
accepted by the Government, or formally 
rejected, with reasons for rejection given. 



Unemployment in Britain rose to 814,632 in January, the Ministry of Labour 
announced last month. This was an increase of 248,474 over the figure in December. 

It meant that 3.6 per cent of Britain's total labour force was unemployed in January, 
compared with 2.5 per cent in December. . 

It was estimated that 144,000 men were temporarily out of work because freezing 
weather halted construction projects. 

Tue January figure was the highest since the fuel crisis and bitter cold of February 
1947, when unemployment reached 1,874,000. 

Of the January total, 628,486 were unemployed and 186,145 were listed as temporarily 
out of work. 



122 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



Employment and Unemployment, January* 



Employment declined by 204,000 to 
5,956,000 between December and January. 
This was about the usual decrease for this 
time of year. Men accounted for 147,000 
and women for 57,000 of the decrease. 

Unemployment rose by 127,000 to 541,- 
000 during the month, about a normal 
increase for this period. The January unem- 
ployment total was 8.3 per cent of the 
labour force. A month earlier the rate was 
6.3 per cent. In January 1962 it was 8.5 
per cent and in January 1961 it was 10.8 
per cent. 

The labour force declined by 77,000 
between December and January, as many of 
those no longer working in seasonal indus- 
tries left the labour market. 

The estimated labour force in January 
was 88,000 higher than a year earlier. Em- 
ployment was 92,000 higher than in January 
1962. 

Employment — As usual, employment fell 
sharply between December and January 
as a result of seasonal slackening in retail 
trade and outdoor activities. Non-farm em- 
ployment dropped by 160,000, a smaller- 
than-average decrease for the month, but 
farm employment declined by 44,000, some- 
what more than usual for this time of year. 

Employment changes between December 
and January were in line with seasonal 
patterns in all regions except Quebec, where 
the decline was less than seasonal. 

During the past few months, there has 
been a noticeable strengthening in employ- 
ment for men, a reflection of an improved 
situation in the goods-producing industries. 
On the other hand, job opportunities for 
women have tended to decline owing to 
lack of growth in some of the service- 
producing industries. 

Most non-farm industries continued to 
have higher employment than a year earlier. 



The largest year-to-year gains were in 
service, manufacturing and construction. 
Employment was lower than a year earlier 
in agriculture and forestry. 

Unemployment — Between December and 
January, unemployment rose by 127,000, 
about a normal change for the time of 
year. The increase was mainly among men. 

Of the unemployed in January, 468,000 
were men and 73,000 were women. 

Some 416,000, or more than three quar- 
ters of the total, had been unemployed 
for three months or less. An estimated 
71,000 had been seeking work from four 
to six months, and 54,000 for more than 
six months. 

Unemployment in January was higher 
than a year earlier in Quebec and notice- 
ably lower in Ontario. In other regions, 
unemployment was about the same as the 
year before. 

The classification of labour market areas 
in January shows that two metropolitan 
areas, Edmonton and Montreal, moved from 
Group 2 (moderate labour surplus) to 
Group 1 (substantial labour surplus) during 
the month. Four major industrial areas — 
Brantford, Fort William-Port Arthur, Peter- 
borough and Rouyn-Val D'Or — and one 
major agricultural area, Lethbridge, also 
moved from Group 2 to Group 1. 

Eleven minor areas made the same 
move: Beauharnois, Drummondville, Kent- 
ville, Lachute-Ste. Therese, Lindsay, Medi- 
cine Hat, Owen Sound, Pembroke, Portage 
La Prairie, St. Jean, and Simcoe. 

One major industrial area, Guelph, moved 
from Group 3 (appproximate balance) to 
Group 2, as did three minor areas: Listowel, 
Stratford, and Woodstock-Tillsonburg. 

There were no areas in Group 4 (labour 
shortage) and only one minor area — 
Kitimat — in Group 3. 



*See Tables A-l to A-3, pages 169 and 170. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate 
Balance 


Labour 

Shortage 


Labour Market 
Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 


January 
1963 


January 
1962 


January 
1963 


January 
1962 


January 
1963 


January 
1962 


January 
1963 


January 
1962 


Metropolitan 


8 
16 

6 
39 


8 
15 

6 
36 


4 
10 

8 
18 


4 
11 

8 ' 
21 










Major Industrial 










Major Agricultural 










Minor 


1 


1 












Total 


69 


65 


40 


44 


1 


1 













THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



123 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed . . .'. (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts.' 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 
Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.). . 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables i 

Non-durables 



January 
January 
January 
January 
January 

January 
January 
January 

January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 

January 
January 

November 
November 

lst9mos. 1962 
lst9mos. 1962 



January 
January 
January 



November 
November 
November 
November 
January 

November 
November 



December 
December 
December 
December 



6,497 
5,956 
538 
5,418 
4,945 



5,117 
668 
171 

541 

88 

192 

130 

73 

58 

503 

38 

124.2 
114.7 

56,568 
28,506 



24 

4,559 

79,780 



$81.58 

$ 1.90 

41.2 

$78.15 

132.0 

142.0 
1,713 



182.0 
160.0 
162.4 
158.0 



- 1.2 

- 3.3 

- 7.6 

- 2.9 

- 3.0 

- 4.4 

- 0.9 

+ 28. e 

+30.7 

+25.7 
+24.7 
+39.8 
+43.1 
+26.1 

+30.0 
+40.7 



-17.3 

+25.2 
+41.0 



0.0 

+ 0.5 

- 0.3 
+ 0.2 
+ 0.1 

+ 0.3 

- 1.3 



- 6.3 

- 7.8 

- 7.1 

- 8.4 



+ 1.4 
+ 1.6 

- 6.4 
+ 2.4 
+ 3.3 

+ 1.5 

- 1.3 
+15.5 

- 0.7 
+ 4.8 
+ 7.3 
-12.8 

- 2.7 
0.0 

- 0.6 

- 2.6 



2.1 
3.4 

0.7 

2.3 



-40.0 
-50.3 
- 6.6 



+ 3.5 

+ 3.3 

+ 0.2 

+ 3.3 

+ 1.8 

+ 1.7 

+ 5.4 



+ 4.7 
+ 5.6 
+10.8 
+ 1.5 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from The 
Labour Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. These figures are the 
result of a monthly survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the purpose of providing 
estimates of the labour force characteristics of the civilian non-institutional population of working 
age. (More than 35,000 households chosen by area sampling methods in approximately 170 different 
areas in Canada are visited each month.) The civilian labour force is that portion of the civilian non- 
institutional population 14 years of age and over that was employed or unemployed during the survey 
week. 



124 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Role of Indicative Programming in Success 

of Some Western European Countries 

"Indicative programming" and economic forecasting rather than rigid planning 
underlie most of remarkable economic successes. Widest participation by all 
sectors of economy considered vital in forming national plans and objectives 



"Indicative programming" and forecasting 
instead of rigid economic planning have 
been the basis of most of the remarkable 
economic growth of several Western Euro- 
pean countries during the recent past. 
Labour plays an indispensable role in help- 
ing to chart or "indicate" the economic 
courses of most of these countries. The 
widest participation by all sectors of the 
economy is considered vital in forming 
national plans with a common purpose, and 
in carrying them out. Public opinion con- 
sequently supports the efforts and con- 
tributes to the success of the programming 
and economic forecasting. 

These, in essence, are some of the main 
points brought out in an address entitled 
"The Role of Indicative Programming in 
the Economic Successes of Some Western 
European Countries," by Dr. R. V. Yohe, 
President of B.F. Goodrich Canada Limited, 
at a December meeting of the Windsor 
Chamber of Commerce. Dr. Yohe's observa- 
tions and remarks were based on the recent 
National Productivity Council's fact-finding 
mission to Europe, of which he was a 
member (L.G., Aug. 1962, p. 909, and 
Nov. 1962, p. 1261). 

The term "indicative programming" in- 
stead of "planning" was favoured by eco- 
nomic leaders of most of the countries 
visited by the National Productivity Coun- 
cil's mission, said Dr. Yohe. It was less 
subject to confusion with the rigid planning 
of totalitarian states, they thought. Four of 
the six countries visited — Holland, West 
Germany, France and Belgium — were mem- 
bers of the European Common Market. The 
other two remaining countries that were 
visited and studied were Sweden and Bri- 
tain. 

In most of these countries, labour plays a 
direct and indispensable role in the pro- 
gramming and economic forecasting, through 
wide representation on the bodies engaged 
in this task. In this respect, Britain and West 
Germany can be considered as exceptions 
in their approach. In Britain, the advisory 
planning body — the National Economic De- 
velopment Council — has only recently been 
born, but organized labour there has agreed 
to provide representation on it. In West 
Germany, with its free economy, there is no 
central planning, although an advisory coun- 
cil to set up guideposts has been proposed. 



In Sweden, officers of trade unions par- 
ticipate in the work of the royal planning 
commissions that are frequently used for 
special economic studies. These supplement 
other groups that have major responsibilities 
in drawing up the government budget and 
in long-term forecasting and planning. On 
the planning commissions, labour joins civil 
servants, employers' organizations and uni- 
versity economists. In The Netherlands, 
government economists referred to labour 
and management as "working partners" with 
the Government on economic policy. 

The widest possible participation by the 
various sectors of the economy, joining in 
a common purpose, as in Sweden, tends to 
assure the success of the programming. 
There, Dr. Yohe explained, "the influence 
of the long-term perspective on economic 
decisions was emphasized and attributed to 
the fact that people from all sections of 
the economy were involved in preparing the 
forecast. The discussions between repre- 
sentatives of the private and public sectors 
played an important part in forming public 
opinion." The economic forecasting and 
planning, with reports based on a co-opera- 
tive system of fact finding, thus gained the 
support of public opinion, necessary to the 
realization of the forecasts. 

"The reports were also widely discussed 
in professional circles, in the press and 
on radio and television. In this way an 
'image' of the economic future for the 
country was created, which inspired public 
confidence and acceptance," Dr. Yohe ob- 
served. There was, however, no central 
economic "plan" as such in Sweden. 

Dealing with planning in general, the 
speaker explained: 

The misconceptions that many people have 
over the word "planning" are not unlike the 
misconceptions that labour has over the word 
"productivity," and which misconceptions are 
erroneous in the light of the philosophies of 
productivity enunciated and practised in other 
countries.* 

Comparing government planning with the 
planning as exercised by individual companies 
in Canada, Dr. Yohe said: 

I'm somewhat confused also at some manage- 
ments and representatives of management when 
they recoil in apprehension when government 



* See also Dr. Yohe's report on the "Common 
Declaration on Productivity" issued in Belgium for 
the National Congress on Productivity, Labour 
Gazette, October 1962, p. 1111. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



125 



planning is even mentioned, since I doubt that 
there is a company in all Canada that does not 
consciously or unconsciously have rather defini- 
tive plans for its future . . . 

I contend that, within the broad concept of 
democratic government, there is a startling 
similarity between the real marketing concept, 
as it is widely practised by industry today, 
and the approach that whole countries can 
take in the conduct of the economic affairs of 
these countries. I further contend that there 
need be no real abrogation of democratic 
principles of government in so doing. 

Planning, Forecasting in Europe 

Planning in the European countries visited 
ranged from doing it in relatively great 
detail over a period of years, as in France, 
to the German system, "which leaves the 
market forces as the main guides to develop- 
ment." Even in France, however, said Dr. 
Yohe, there was not a widespread direction 
of industry, but the planning rather took 
the form of setting objectives, in which 
industry itself played a major role and was 
encouraged to achieve the objectives by 
means other than government direction. 

In London, the following statement had 
been made to the visiting Productivity 
Council mission: 

Unemployment of more than 2 per cent 
causes great disquietude. Unemployment below 
H per cent leads to inflation. Such a narrow 
range leads to individual crises of one kind or 
another. This stop-and-go circumstance led 
industrialists to turn to planning as a means 
of eliminating short-term fluctuations and as 
a means of accelerating Britain's growth. 

It was then agreed that the only way to 
solve the problem was to develop greater 
co-operation between government-labour-man- 
agement. The National Economic Development 
Council was the result. 

Reverting to Sweden, Dr. Yohe said there 
were no national goals or objectives estab- 
lished by government policy or acts of 
Parliament, but that long-term forecasting 
and planning had been the practice in that 
country for the past 15 years. The principal 
factual material for the long-range studies 
made in Sweden had come from company 
and sector plans. 

In The Netherlands, "rationalization of 
productive capacity is lawful and firms may 
engage in arrangements of this sort, pro- 
vided their purpose is not to increase prices." 
Very large companies existed and domin- 
ated their fields, the speaker pointed out. 
Cartel or combine arrangements were not 
forbidden. It had also been pointed out 
there, however, that what succeeded in 
The Netherlands would not necessarily work 
in other countries. 

In Germany, neither labour nor manage- 
ment was anxious to see placed into effect 
a plan for a "super economic body" that 
had existed for years. Spokesmen for both 



126 



parties had said, however, they would be 
agreeable to the establishment of such a 
body, "provided it was independent and 
impartial and its findings were not binding 
upon them in bargaining. They did not 
think the Government should follow the 
Swedish or Dutch pattern." 

The highly advanced form of indicative 
planning of France, in which several dif- 
ferent possible courses of action were iden- 
tified, was also described by government 
economists there as being "persuasive" rather 
than a coercive, centralized type of "eco- 
nomic planning," Dr. Yohe said. 

A fourth plan now being drafted by 
France was featured by wide participation 
by the public. Its drafting involved some 
3,500 participants: labour and industry 
leaders, civil servants, and independent ex- 
perts. The whole concept of the French 
planning system is based on the philosophy 
that those who are to carry out the plan 
should have a part in the making of it, Dr. 
Yohe added. 

In Belgium, the word "planning" was 
avoided and "programming" used instead, 
because the former "is believed to be offen- 
sive to the business community." 

Belgian Indicative Programming 

The Belgian Central Economic Council 
explained the differences between economic 
programming and forecasting, and defined 
indicative programming as follows: 

Indicative programming is different from a 
mere forecast of economic and social develop- 
ment. Such a forecast is indeed the first stage 
in all indicative programming, but the latter 
goes a great deal further. The results obtained 
from preliminary forecast calculations are com- 
pared with the general objectives desired by 
the Government. When this comparison has 
been made, the necessary amendments are 
effected after consultations with the economic 
and social groups concerned, in order to arrive 
at a coherent program in accordance with the 
objectives which have been set. It would be 
desirable to draw up the economic budget by 
this method every year, and to outline middle- 
and long-term development programs. 

A Belgian five-year economic develop- 
ment program calls for an annual growth 
rate of 4.4 per cent, but Belgian indus- 
trialists believe that this or any other pre- 
conceived figure is theoretical, reported Dr. 
Yohe. 

In conclusion, he said: 

Call it planning, or whatever, nevertheless, 
what is represented here is an organized attempt 
by whole countries, through the engagement ot 
all elements of society into a common purpose, 
to adapt the individual circumstances ot tnese 
countries to the highly competitive nature of 
things in the world today. 

The lessons to be gained from the evident 
successes should not be lightly dismissed. I 
might even suggest that after careful evaluation 
we might even improve on them. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



Facing Facts in Labour Relations 



Strikes are not obsolete and neither party wants the alternative, government 
regulation; but where the interests ot the parties conflict with the interests 
of the public, it is the latter that should prevail, says H. Carl Goldenberg 



Strikes are not the general rule; most 
collective agreements are negotiated without 
strikes. 

Laws will not by themselves assure indus- 
trial peace. 

Trade unions and collective bargaining 
are an essential feature of modern industrial 
society. 

Labour relations laws should be reviewed 
periodically in the light of experience and 
changing conditions. 

Both labour and management must face 
the facts of industrial life, and both must 
take account of their public image. 

The alternative to strikes and lockouts is 
state regulation, which neither party wants; 
nevertheless, where the interests of the par- 
ties conflict with the interests of the com- 
munity, it is the interests of the community 
that should prevail. 

The suggestion that strikes are obsolete 
is an example of both over-simplification and 
over-optimism. Change in our society has 
reduced some of the causes of tension in 
industrial relations but has not eliminated 
them; in fact, change has created new ten- 
sions. And these new problems call for 
close co-operation between labour and 
management. 

All these points were made by H. Carl 
Goldenberg, O.B.E., Q.C., in an address, 
"Facing Facts in Labour Relations," to the 
Empire Club, Toronto, in mid-November. 
M,r. Goldenberg, a Montreal lawyer who 
has become well-known as a mediator and 
arbitrator of labour-management disputes, 
was, during the closing years of the Second 
World War, Chairman of the Industrial 
Production Co-operation Board, forerunner 
of the Labour-Management Co-operation 
Service of the Department of Labour. 

Mr. Goldenberg said that a refusal to 
face facts by one side or the other, or 
both sides, was a major cause of misunder- 
standing between labour and management. 
And the public, too, is inclined to judge a 
dispute in terms of "right" and "wrong," he 
said, but "the fact is that generally neither 
side is wholly right or wholly wrong." 

The public might also be mistaken in 
its appraisal of the state of labour relations 
in general. Publicity surrounding strikes 
gives an exaggerated impression of industrial 
conflict. But the fact is that strikes are not 
the general rule. "The general rule is indus- 
trial peace." 



The vast majority of collective agreements 
are negotiated without strikes and without 
publicity, he said. 

Laws are necessary to regulate the exer- 
cise of power and to curb its abuse. But 
there are problems in human relations that 
cannot be solved by law alone, and laws, 
however stringent, will not by themselves 
assure industrial peace. 

"Peaceful relations between the parties 
will therefore depend not on laws but on 
the degree to which they are willing and 
able to understand each other and to make 
compromises imposed by the facts that 
confront them." This was especially true 
in a democracy, he said, and "collective 
bargaining is the application of democratic 
practice to industrial relations . . . 

Collective Bargaining 

"Trade unions and collective bargaining 
are an essential feature of modern industrial 
society. In the absence of collective bargain- 
ing there would be no bargaining at all 
under a system where the parties are as 
unequal in power as the individual worker 
and the corporation which employs him," 
Mr. Goldenberg asserted. 

Because in Canada, and the United States, 
collective bargaining has not been univer- 
sally accepted by both parties as the normal 
method for negotiating terms of employ- 
ment, it was found necessary to enact laws 
to make collective bargaining mandatory 
under prescribed conditions. 

Certain delays in the procedures pre- 
scribed by law are allowed. But where the 
delays are such as to permit one party to 
take advantage of them to frustrate the 
other, the results are not conducive to good 
labour relations. 

The longer the settlement of a labour dis- 
pute is delayed, the more inflexible and un- 
reasonable the parties tend to become in the 
positions they have taken . . . The parties for 
the time being seem to forget that a settlement 
has to be reached at some stage. They forget 
the truth of what Mackenzie King, who was a 
student of labour-management relations, pointed 
out, when he said that: "With Labour and 
Capital it is very much as with husband and 
wife; despite differences, they must continue 
to live together, or cease the relationship 
altogether." 

Since they are enacted to deal with the 
facts of industrial life, labour relations laws 
should be reviewed from time to time to 
take into account changing conditions and 
past experience. If delays which the laws 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



127 



permit are found to unduly retard settle- 
ments, such delays should be reduced. Un- 
due delays intended to postpone legal strike 
action, in Mr. Goldenberg's opinion, are at 
least partly responsible for "wildcat" strikes. 

He also emphasized that procedures suit- 
able for some branches of industry were 
not necessarily appropriate for others — as 
one example, industries with year-round 
employment had conditions different from 
those that were seasonal. 

But, more important, both parties must 
face the facts of industrial life: they have 
to live with them. If changes in traditional 
bargaining procedures are indicated, both 
parties must be prepared to make them, 
said Mr. Goldenberg. Here he referred to 
his report as a Royal Commissioner on 
labour relations in the Ontario construction 
industry (L.G., July 1962, p. 775), in which 
he had said that although tradition dies 
hard, new procedures should be adopted as 
required and indicated by the facts imposed 
by the nature of the industry. 

In his report he had also asserted his 
belief that free collective bargaining would 
best be preserved by negotiation and agree- 
ment between the parties, each prepared 
"to face the problems and make necessary 
adjustments. Failing this, public opinion 
may, wisely or unwisely, lead to the im- 
position of restrictive controls." 

Public Image 

In labour relations, both parties must take 
account of their public image, Mr. Golden- 
berg continued. "Institutions operating in a 
democratic society cannot afford to ignore 
the impact of their conduct on public 
opinion." 

This public image is not improved by 
disputes that arise from a persistent refusal 
to make reasonable compromises required 
by the facts. Jurisdictional disputes are an 
example. The public did not understand 
that the underlying reason for jurisdictional 
disputes is the simple human instinct for 
self-preservation, said Mr. Goldenberg. 

To aid in solving such disputes without 
work stoppages, he recommended that la- 
bour itself establish the machinery for their 
settlement. This machinery is also required 
to deal with disputes arising from raids on 
the membership of other unions. The public 
understands strikes arising from conflicts 
with employers; it does not understand 
strikes arising from conflicts between unions. 

Reference to the public image brings to 
mind instances of the abuse of power. Some 
people tend to judge all union leaders by 
the acts of a small majority, but "this is 
as unfair as it would be to condemn all 
businessmen because inquiries have dis- 
closed dishonest practices by some of them." 



And in attempts to curb such abuses, it 
was necessary to avoid legislation that 
would punish the innocent with the guilty, 
and that "has the ulterior motive of impos- 
ing severe restrictions on free collective 
bargaining." 

Here Mr. Goldenberg commented on "so- 
called 'right-to-work' legislation." The term 
"right-to-work" is only a catch-phrase, he 
said. "Its authors have shown an interest 
neither in rights nor in work. They are 
interested primarily in setting the clock 
back so far as the democratic right to 
bargain collectively is concerned." 

Protection against abuse of power calls 
for legislation but to be effective requires 
also the exercise of responsibility by the 
persons concerned: in a union, by the rank 
and file. 

The same employers who complain of 
the absence of democracy in a union will 
complain also of lack of authority on the 
part of leaders and of inability by unions to 
enforce contracts. "For effective collective 
bargaining and enforcement of contracts, 
we have to face the fact that there must 
be some compromise between the authority 
of the elected officers of a union and the 
control over their actions vested in the 
membership." 

Strikes 

The charge that some union leaders called 
strikes without the approval of their mem- 
bers was true only in infrequent cases, and 
there, such practice should not be con- 
doned. The public must not be led to 
conclude that union leaders are "strike- 
happy," he added. 

Nor should it be concluded that there is a 
cure-all for settling all industrial disputes with- 
out strikes by unions or lockouts by employers. 
Mediation or voluntary arbitration by third 
parties would be the more civilized method, 
but, since mutual confidence has not yet re- 
placed mutual suspicion, I am afraid that the 
required degree of civilization has not yet been 
attained. 

Under totalitarian regimes, he said, 
strikes were prohibited, but in a democratic 
state, to force men to work under conditions 
they found objectionable could only be 
justified by exceptional circumstances. 

We must face the fact that the right to 
strike and the employer's right to declare a 
lockout are necessary counterparts to free 
collective bargaining. The strike and the lockout 
are methods, however painful, for reaching 
agreement. The alternative is state regulation, 
which the parties to industry are not prepared 
to accept. Neither party wants agreement to 
be imposed upon them. 

Mr. Goldenberg then explained how the 
right to strike in Canada was controlled by 
legislation. 

(Continued on page 155) 



128 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



Major Settlements in 1962 



During 1962, collective bargaining in 
Canada led to 227 settlements that applied 
to bargaining units of 500 or more em- 
ployees. These settlements covered approx- 
imately 477,000 workers engaged in indus- 
tries outside the construction sector. 

Of the major agreements signed in 1962, 
more than half were negotiated in the 
manufacturing sector of the economy. Other 
major collective agreements signed during 
the year were negotiated on behalf of 
workers in the transportation, storage and 
communications, gas and electric power 
distribution and retail trade industries. A 
number of agreements were negotiated also 
in such service sectors as municipal and 
provincial governments, hospitals, hotels 
and restaurants. 

The largest single group of workers 
affected by contract negotiations during 
1962 was the 100,000 non-operating em- 
ployees of the CNR, CPR and other rail- 
ways. 

Of the major contracts signed during the 
year, 71 were for one year's duration, 84 
for two years and 57 for a three-year term. 
Four contracts having terms ranging from 
nearly four to five years were negotiated 
in the transportation industry. 

More than three fifths of the one-year 
contracts granted increases of 3 to 7 cents 
an hour on labour rates. Within this range, 
the , majority of agreements provided for 
wage increases of 4 and 5 cents an hour. 

Of the two-year agreements, more than 
three fifths provided for wage increases of 
7 to 13 cents an hour, with hourly wage 
increases of 7, 10 and 13 cents being the 
most common. 

Slightly more than one half of the three- 
year agreements provided for increases in 
labour rates of 15 to 20 cents an hour, most 
of them ranging from 15 to 18 cents an 
hour. Wage increases of 10 to 14 cents 
an hour were negotiated in approximately 
one quarter of the three-year settlements. 

All but 13 of the major settlements con- 
cluded in 1962 provided for general wage 
increases. But the 13 exceptions, which 
covered about 16,000 workers, included 
improvements in such areas as premium 
pay, vacations, pensions, group life insur- 
ance, weekly indemnities, cost-of-living 



adjustments and employer contributions to 
welfare plans. 

The most extensive collective bargaining 
in the manufacturing sector occurred in the 
pulp and paper industry, where 27 major 
settlements covering 37,000 workers were 
negotiated. Twenty-two of the agreements 
in this industry were for a term of one 
year, and two thirds of these included 
wage increases of 4 and 5 cents an hour 
for workers in eastern Canada. A wage 
increase of 7 cents an hour on labour 
rates was agreed to in British Columbia in 
one-year contracts signed by MacMillan, 
Bloedel and Powell River Industries, Crown 
Zellerbach of Canada and other western 
Canadian companies. There were four major 
two-year settlements in the pulp and paper 
industry; three provided for a wage increase 
of 10 cents an hour and the fourth for 
increases totalling 7 cents an hour. 

In the food and beverages industry, 17 
major agreements covering approximately 
25,000 workers were negotiated in 1962. 
Wage increases amounting to Hi cents an 
hour over two years were the pattern in 
the meat packing industry, where Burns 
and Company, Canada Packers and Swift 
Canadian negotiated four agreements cover- 
ing a total of 11,400 employees. Another 
two-year settlement, reached by several 
dairies in Toronto, included a wage increase 
of 20 cents an hour. 

In the Ontario and Quebec brewing indus- 
try, wage increases amounting to 22 cents 
an hour over a three-year period were 
negotiated by the Brewery Workers. Two 
major settlements were concluded in the 
distilling industry — a two-year agreement 
giving an increase of 18 cents an hour on 
base rates to employees of the House of 
Seagram in Quebec, Ontario and British 
Columbia, and a three-year contract pro- 
viding for a total wage increase of 26 
cents an hour on labour rates at Hiram 
Walker and Sons in Ontario. 

In the tobacco industry, Imperial Tobacco 
negotiated a two-year contract increasing 
the labourer's rate by 28£ cents an hour. 

Fifteen major agreements covering 26,000 
workers, mostly in Quebec and Ontario, 
were negotiated in the iron and steel prod- 
ucts industry. Most of these contracts will 



This review is prepared by the Collective Bargaining Section, Labour-Management 
Division, of the Economics and Research Branch. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



129 



be in effect for two or three years. The 
two-year settlements included a master 
agreement giving a total wage increase of 
6 cents an hour to employees at Continental 
Can plants across Canada and two settle- 
ments concluded by Canadian Steel Foun- 



dries and General Steel Wares, each of 
which granted a wage increase of 7 cents 
an hour. Dominion Engineering agreed to 
increase wages by 13 cents an hour, the 
highest wage increase under a major two- 
year contract in this industry. 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING 1962, BY INDUSTRY 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more employees concluded between January 1 and December 31, 1962, ex- 
cluding agreements in the construction industry and agreements with wage terms in piece or mileage rates only. The 
data are based on preliminary reports where copies of new collective agreements had not been received before compilation. 



Industry and 


Term of Agreement in Months 


Total Wage 
Increase in Cents 


Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27-32 


33 and over 


per Hour* 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Forestry 

7 


1 
1 


900 
500 


















8 






2 

1 


1,400 
500 










10 














13 


1 

1 


800 
500 










1 


3,000 


14 
















15 


1 


800 














16 






1 


27.000 
6,000 










20 


















Milling 




, 


500 














3 






1 


1,200 










10 














1 
2 
4 
2 

1 


600 


12 


















1,100 


15 


















3,130 


18 


















2,200 


20 


















500 


Manufacturing 




6 
1 
2 
8 
16 


4,450 

800 

9.500 

4.980 

23,720 






1 


1,300 


1 


5,300 




2 










3 














1 


700 


4 


1 


500 












5 


4 
2 
5 
2 
2 
10 
1 
7 
5 


2,770 
1,600 
5,430 
1,750 
2,100 

16.900 
1,900 

13,250 
9,250 






1 
1 


1,800 


6 










800 


7 


2 
2 


6.000 
5.600 












8 










3 


3,600 


9 












10 














3 


10,280 


11 










1 


800 




12 














13 










2 


3,100 


3 

1 
2 
2 
3 
6 
2 


3,680 


14 










550 


15 


1 


1,200 






2 


2,650 


1 


1,000 


1,290 


16 








17 


















4,480 
14 650 


18 










2 


2,400 






19 














2,050 


20 










1 
1 


1,700 
800 






22 


















26 














1 


600 


29 










1 

1 


3,500 
1,300 








32 


















39 














1 
1 


1,500 
1,000 


43 


















Transportation, 
Storage and 
Communication 




1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1,200 
1,000 
8.980 
1.520 
10,000 
1,380 
550 














2 


















3 


















5 






1 


550 










6 














7 






5 


117,810 










8 














9 


















11 






1 


1,100 










12 














1 


650 


13 






1 


530 








14 


















15 














1 


1,200 


18 




















19 










1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


7 000 


20 


















1,800 
500 


23 


















26 


















1,500 
700 


28 







































130 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING 1962, BY INDUSTRY— (Concluded) 



Industry and 


Term of Agreement in Months 


Total Wage 
Increase in Cents 


Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27 32 


33 and over 


per Hour* 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Public Utility 

o 


1 


840 


















3 


1 


730 














14 


1 


1,300 














15 














2 
1 

1 


12,100 


19 


















700 


24 


















700 


39 










1 


900 








Trade 

o 


1 

1 


1,500 
1,000 














4 


















7 ... 






1 
1 
2 
2 


4.000 
3.000 
1.400 
2,180 










10. ., 










1 


850 






13 














15 


















17 














1 
1 
1 


2,400 


20 


















800 


22 














1 


540 


1,100 


Service 

o 


1 
4 
2 

1 


600 
4,450 
1,750 

1,250 












3 


















4 














1 


1,200 


5 
















6 






1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 


1.200 

1,900 

1,800 

550 

1,050 

3,400 










7 










1 


750 


8 












9 


















10 


















11... 














1 
1 


750 


13 














600 


15 .., 
















16... 


















28 ... 


1 
1 


600 
550 














29 . 


















40 






1 


1,000 




























Total 


71 


109,100 


3 


2,030 


84 


260,230 


8 


12,320 


61 


93,310 



*The wage increases shown relate only to base rates, i.e., labour rates or their equivalent. Fractions of a ''entare 
rounded to nearest cent. The data on the number of employees covered are approximate and include all classifications 
covered by the agreement. 



Among major three-year agreements 
signed in the iron and steel products indus- 
try, three contracts, all at Steel Company 
of Canada plants, provided for an increase 
in labour rates of 10 cents an hour, and 
two contracts at International Harvester 
and Dominion Structural Steel increased 
base rates by 13 cents an hour. Settlements 
providing for a wage increase of 15 cents 
an hour over three years were negotiated 
by Canada Iron Foundries and Union Car- 
bide (Metals and Carbon Division). Massey- 
Ferguson granted a wage increase of 18 
cents an hour in a three-year master 
agreement covering workers at plants in 
Toronto, Brantford and Woodstock, Ont. 

In the transportation equipment industry, 
seven of the 14 major agreements, applying 
to 21,000 workers, were for a three-year 
term. These three-year agreements were 
signed by such companies as Ford, Chrysler, 
American Motors, Electric Auto-Lite, Inter- 
national Harvester and DeHavilland Air- 
craft and provided for labour rate increases 
of 16 to 18 cents an hour. 



In the electrical products industry, con- 
tract negotiations resulted in eight major 
agreements covering 14,000 employees. Two 
of these agreements, signed by Northern 
Electric, were for a one-year term and 
provided for a base rate increase of 3 cents 
an hour. Four agreements were for a period 
of two years and, with the exception of a 
settlement giving a base rate increase of 
12 cents an hour to salaried personnel of 
Canadian Marconi, provided for wage in- 
creases of 7 to 9 cents an hour. There 
were two agreements of three years dura- 
tion — one providing for a wage increase of 
14 cents an hour at Phillips Electrical and 
another giving a labour rate increase of 18 
cents an hour to plant employees of Cana- 
dian Marconi. 

Five-cent-an-hour wage increases were 
granted in the rubber industry under one- 
year contracts signed by B. F. Goodrich, 
Dunlop, Firestone Tire and Rubber and 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber. In another 
one-year agreement, no wage increase was 
granted by Dominion Rubber (Tire Divi- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



131 



sion) but this settlement was accompanied 
by a three-year supplemental agreement 
incorporating significant improvements in 
fringe benefits. 

Major agreements of two years duration 
were signed in the textile and synthetic 
fibres industries in Quebec and Ontario. 
Wage increases amounting to 13 cents an 
hour were embodied in three contracts 
involving textile manufacturers, and base 
rate increases ranging from 9 to 15 cents 
an hour were included in four settlements in 
synthetic fibres manufacturing. 

Approximately 12,000 employees in the 
trucking industry across Canada were af- 
fected by new master agreements signed in 
1962. One agreement, covering truckers in 
the Prairie region, provided for a total 
wage increase of 13 cents an hour over 
two years. In Ontario, several car carrying 
firms agreed to wage increases totalling 
18 cents an hour in a two-year contract, 
and northern Ontario freight companies 
agreed to raise wages by 23 cents an hour 
over three years. A general settlement in 
southern Ontario provided for wage in- 
creases of 19 to 22 cents an hour over 
four years for dockmen, checkers and 
drivers employed by 53 trucking companies; 
most of these companies were parties to 
a 44-month agreement providing for wage 
increases ranging from 20 to 24 cents an 
hour, depending on skill, for mechanics. 
In Quebec, eight firms operating out of 
Montreal were parties to a four-year agree- 
ment providing for a wage increase of 26 
cents an hour for truckers based in Mont- 
real and 30 cents an hour for employees 
in branch depots. 

In Newfoundland, the Railway, Transport 
and General Workers signed an agreement 
for five years, a longer term than any other 
major contract negotiated in 1962, with 
Canadian National Newfoundland Steam- 
ship Service. Under this agreement, the 
wage for a seaman will be increased by 
28 cents an hour in five annual steps. 

In the telephone communications indus- 
try, about 38,000 employees across Canada 
received wage increases under 11 new 
agreements. Nine agreements were for a 
period of one year, and most of these pro- 
vided for base rate increases of 5 to 9 
cents an hour. There were only two major 
two-year agreements in this industry, and 
these granted base rate increases of 5 to 
7 cents an hour. 



The majority of major settlements in the 
service sector were negotiated by municipal 
governments and hospitals. Municipalities 
that entered into major contracts, covering 
a total of 18,000 workers, were the cities 
of Vancouver, Edmonton, Ottawa, Toronto 
and Metropolitan Toronto and the town- 
ships of North York and Scarborough. Van- 
couver concluded four one-year agreements 
giving base rate increases of 3 to 5 cents 
an hour, and the other municipalities signed 
ten two-year agreements with base rate 
increases ranging from 7 to 16 cents an 
hour. 

Hospitals were parties to eight major 
settlements applying to 6,500 workers. Most 
of these were for a period of one year; 
wage increases of 5 to -7 cents an hour in 
one-year agreements for such employees as 
male orderlies and general help were the 
most common, except in Quebec, where 
several hospitals agreed to increase rates 
for these classifications by 28 to 29 cents 
an hour. 

In the logging industry, 12 major settle- 
ments were concluded, covering approx- 
imately 40,000 woods employees in New- 
foundland, Quebec and British Columbia. 
About 27,000 of these workers, who were 
employed by 150 logging firms in British 
Columbia, received wage increases amount- 
ing to 16 cents an hour in a two-year 
agreement. In Newfoundland, another 6,000 
workers were covered by a new agree- 
ment between the Carpenters and Anglo- 
Newfoundland Development Company, Bo- 
water's Newfoundland Pulp and Paper 
Mills and Newfoundland Contractors' Asso- 
ciation; under this agreement the labourer's 
rate was increased by 20 cents an hour over 
two years. 

Most of 12 settlements in the mining 
industry in 1962 were for a three-year 
term. Two of the three-year agreements 
were signed by Rio Algom Mines and 
increased the wages of 1,100 uranium miners 
in Ontario by 12 cents an hour. In Quebec, 
four agreements providing for a total labour 
rate increase of 15 cents an hour over 
three years were concluded by Campbell 
Chibougamau Mines, Noranda Mines, Que- 
mont Mining Corporation and Normetal 
Mining Corporation. Labour rate increases 
amounting to 18 cents an hour were agreed 
to elsewhere in Quebec by Canadian Johns- 
Manville and Lake Asbestos of Quebec. 
The highest increase for labourers was 20 
cents an hour over three years for em- 
ployees of Eldorado Mining and Refining 
Limited. 



132 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During February, March and April 

(except those under negotiation in January) 
Company and Location Union 

Abitibi Power & Paper & subsids., Que., Ont. & 
Man. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Alberta Govt. Telephones, province-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Anglo-Cdn. Paper, Forestville, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Associated Fur Industries, Toronto, Ont Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CBC, company-wide Radio & T.V. Empl. (ARTEC) (Ind.) 

Canada Paper, Windsor, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Canada Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. International Paper & subsids., N.B., Que. 

& Ont. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Oper. En- 
gineers (AFL-CIO) 
Consolidated Paper, Grand'Mere, Que. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Consolidated Paper, Cap de la Madeleine & Three 
Rivers, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Consolidated Paper, Shawinigan, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Donnacona Paper, Donnacona, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Dunlop Canada, Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Canada Newsprint Group, Que. & N.S. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
E. B. Eddy, Hull, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Employing Printers' Assn., Montreal, Que Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing Printers' Assn., Montreal, Que Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fairey Aviation, Eastern Passage, N.S Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fisheries Assn., B.C. United Fishermen (Ind.) (tendermen) 

Fisheries Assn. & Cold Storage Cos., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) & Native Brotherhood 

(Ind.) (shore wkrs.) 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort William, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Howard Smith Paper, Cornwall, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Hudson Bay Mining, Flin Flon, Man CLC-chartered local, Machinists (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) & others 

Kellogg Company, London, Ont Millers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kimberly-Clark Paper, Terrace Bay, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & 

I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Paner Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & I.B.E.W. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

MacDonald Tobacco, Montreal, Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (electrical craft 

empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Marathon Corp., Marathon, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario-Minnesota Paper, Fort Frances & Kenora, 

Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario Paper, Thorold, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ottawa, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Price Bros., Kenogami & Riverbend, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Provincial Paper, Thorold, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec Cartier Mining, Port Cartier & Lac 

Jeannine, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec North Shore Paper, Baie Comeau, Que. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

E. S. & A. Robinson (Can.). Leaside, Ont Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rolland Paper, Mont Rolland & St. Jerome, Que. Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
St. Lawrence Corp., Red Rock, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Saskatchewan Government Sask. Govt. Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (labour service 

empl.) 

Silverwood Dairies, Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale EiudI. ( AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St-wock Uranium Mines, Elliot Lake, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Steep Rock Mines, Steep Rock Lake, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 133 



Part II— Negotiations in Progress During January 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Alberta Government Telephones I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

American Can, Hamilton, Simcoe, Ont. & Mont- 
real, Que CLC-chartered local 

Assn. des Marchands Detaillants, Quebec & dis- 
trict, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) (garage 

empl.) 
Assn. des Marchands Detaillants (Produits Ali- 

mentaires), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Atomic Energy of Canada, Chalk River & Deep 

River, Ont Atomic Energy Allied Council (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B. A. Oil, Clarkson, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., New Westminster, Burnaby, 

Fraser Valley, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (beverage dis- 
pensers) 

B.C. Hydro & Power Authority I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hydro & Power Authority Office Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Breweries (various), Winnipeg, Man Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CBC, company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Calgary General Hospital, Calgary, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

Calgary Power & Farm Electric Services, Alta. Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Canadair, St. Laurent, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Farnham, Quebec & Vic- 

toriaville, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Consumers Glass, Toronto, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Continental Can, St. Laurent, Que CLC-chartered local 

Dairies (various), Vancouver & New West- 
minster, B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

David & Frere, Montreal, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Dominion Coal, Glace Bay, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Sydney, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Trenton, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Steel & Coal (Cdn. Bridge), Walker- 

ville, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Donohue Bros., Clermont, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring & two others, 

Toronto, Ont I.L.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (office empl.) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

H. J. Heinz, Leamington, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (4), Trois Rivieres, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Iron Ore of Can., Nfld. & Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lever Bros., Toronto, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Rolling Mill, Selkirk, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical & main- 
tenance empl.) 

Men's Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Toronto, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Millinery Mfrs. Assn., Montreal, Que Hatters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Moirs Ltd. & Moirs Sales, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLO 

Montreal City, Que Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. Fed. (CNTU) (inside 

empl.) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

New Brunswick Power Commission, province- 
wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Noranda Copper & Brass, Montreal, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont. & Montreal, 

Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (plant empl.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Office Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Old Sydney Collieries, Sydney Mines, N.S. Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Quebec North Shore Paper, Baie Comeau, Fran- 

quelin & Shelter Bay, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

St. Boniface General Hospital, St. Boniface, 

Man Empl. Union of Hospital Institutions (Ind.) 

134 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 






Company and Location Union 

Saint John Shipbuilding & Dry Dock, Saint John, 

N.B Various unions 

Saskatchewan Government Telephones Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Sask. Provincial Hospitals, Moose Jaw, North 

Battleford, Prince Albert & Weyburn, Sask CLC-chartered local & Public Service Empl. 

(CLC) 

Shell Oil, Montreal East, Que Empl. Council (Ind.) 

Shipping Federation, Halifax, N.S., Saint John, 

N.B., Montreal, Quebec & Three Rivers, Que. I.L.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

TCA, Canada-wide Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Telegram Publishing, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Star, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver Board of Police Commissioners, Van- 
couver, B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Winnipeg General Hospital, Winnipeg, Man Public Empl. (CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Canada & Dominion Sugar, Montreal, Que Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Cdn. Industries, Brownsburg, Que Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Lithographers' Assn., Eastern Canada Lithographers (Ind.) 

DeHavilland Aircraft, Toronto, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Falconbridge Nickel, Falconbridge, Ont. Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

International Nickel, Sudbury, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Marathon Corp., Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Northern Forest Products, Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Outboard Marine, Peterborough, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Corp., Nipigon, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

B.C. Shipping Federation, various ports Longshoremen & Warehousemen (CLC) 

Council of Printing Industries, Toronto, Ont Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel Empress (C.P.R.), Victoria, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Northern Electric (western region) Toronto, Ont. Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (shop, 

warehouse & installation empl.) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

International Nickel, Port Colborne, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Hospitals (11), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.> 

(inside empl.) 
Quebec City, Que. Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(outside empl.) 

Work Stoppage 

Kimberly-Clark & Spruce Falls Paper, Kapus- 
kasmg & Longlac, Ont Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Que. Iron & Titanium, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Shawinigan Chemicals, Shawinigan, Que CNTU-chartered local 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 13S 



Part III— Settlements Reached During January 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures on the 
number of employees covered are approximate.) 

Abitibi Power & Paper, Northern Ontario — Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 1,500 empl. — wage increases of 60 an hr. on hourly 
rates, 480 a day on daily rates and 2% on all piece-work rates, retroactive to Sept. 1, 1962; 
former empl. on payroll between Sept. 1 and Dec. 10, 1962 entitled to retroactivity provided they 
initiate claims before March 1, 1963; additional wage increase of 2% on piece-work rates eff. 
Sept. 1, 1963; weekly hrs. for day work classifications to be reduced from 44 to 40 with main- 
tenance of take-home pay, eff. Sept. 1, 1963; after Sept. 1, 1963 the company will contribute 
$2.50 toward cost of medical, surgical and hospital care plans (at present $2); rate for general 
labourer after Sept. 1, 1963 will be $15.23 a day. 

Asbestos Corp. & others, Thetford Mines, Que. — Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 
(garage empl.): 3-yr. agreement covering 1,500 empl. — wage increases of 3i% retroactive to Jan. 
1, 1962, 2i% eff. Jan. 1, 1963 and 3% eff. Jan. 1, 1964: evening shift premium (formerly 40) 
increased to 60 in the first yr. of agreement, 70 in the second yr. and 80 in the third yr.; night shift 
premium (formerly 80) increased to 100 in the first yr. of agreement, 110 in the second yr. and 120 
in the third yr.; bereavement leave provision introduced; compulsory check-off supersedes voluntary 
check-off. 

Building maintenance, & window cleaning contractors, Vancouver, B.C. — Bldg. 
Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement covering 600 empl. — hourly wage increases 
of 40 eff. Dec. 1, 1962, 30 eff. July 1, 1963 and 40 eff. July 1, 1964 for janitors and maintenance 
men; 30 eff. Dec. 1, 1962, 30 eff. July 1, 1963 and 20 eff. July 1, 1964 for janitresses and elevator 
operators; 3 wks. vacation after 11 yrs. of service (formerly after 15 yrs.); rate for elevator 
operator after July 1, 1964 will be $1.31 an hr. 

Burnaby District, B.C. — Public Empl. (CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 560 empl. — 
wage increases of 2.3% eff. Jan. 1, 1963 and 2.3% eff. Jan. 1, 1964 for inside wkrs. and foremen; 
50 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1963 and 50 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1964 for outside wkrs.; 3 wks. vacation after 
5 yrs. of service (formerly after 6 yrs. for outside wkrs. and 7 yrs. for inside wkrs. and foremen); 
rate for labourer after Jan. 1, 1964 will be $2.14 an hr. 

CPR system-wide-Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) (dining car staff): 2-yr. agreement cover- 
ing 750 empl. — wage increases of 1% on May 31, 1962 rates retroactive to June 1, 1962, 1% 
on May 31, 1962 rates eff. Jan. 1, 1963, 20 an hr. eff. April, 1963 and 20 an hr. eff. Oct. 1, 1963. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S. — Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. 
agreement covering 800 empl. — wage increases of 1% retroactive to March 1, 1962, 1% additional 
retroactive to Oct. 1, 1962, 30 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1963 and 20 an hr. eff. July 1, 1963; base rate 
for freight handler after July 1, 1963 will be $1,995 an hr. 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort William, Ont. — Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) 
(AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,000 empl. — wage increases of 480 a day on daily 
rates and 2% on piece-work rates, retroactive to Sept. 1, 1962; additional wage increase of 2% 
on piece-work rates eff. Sept. 1, 1963; weekly hrs. for day wkrs. to be reduced from 44 to 40 
with maintenance of take-home pay eff. Sept. 1, 1963; after Sept. 1, 1963 the company will 
contribute $2.50 toward cost of medical, surgical and hospital care plans (at present $2); rate 
for general labourer after Sept, 1, 1963 will be $15.22 a day. 

Hotel Chateau Laurier (CNR), Ottawa, Ont. — Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. 
(CLC) : 3-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — hourly wage increases of 30 retroactive to March 1, 
1962, 20 eff. March 1, 1963 and 20 eff. March 1, 1964; double time for work on paid holidays 
(formerly alternate time off); 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service (formerly after 35 yrs.); 
maid's rate after March 1, 1964 will be 970 an hr. plus room & board. 

Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C. — Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC): 
3-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — general wage increases of 40 an hr. retroactive to March 1, 
1962, 30 an hi. eff. March 1, 1963 and 30 an hr. eff. March 1, 1964; 4 wks. vacation after 25 
yrs. of service (formerly after 35 yrs.). 

Maritime Tel. & Tel., Eastern Electric & Supply, N.S.— I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
(plant empl.): 1-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — weekly wage increases ranging from 250 
to $3; 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service (formerly after 35 yrs.); maximum weekly rate for 
utility man $63. 

Maritime Tel. & Tel., N.S., — I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.): 1-yr. agreement 
covering 730 empl. — weekly wage increases ranging from 500 to $2.50; maximum weekly rate for 
operator $55.50. 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont. — Retail, Wholesale Empl: (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. 
agreement covering 500 empl. — wage increases of 3% eff. Jan. 1, 1963, 2% eff. Jan. 1, 1964; 
rate for labourer after Jan. 1, 1964 will be $1.58i. 

Wabasso Cotton, Welland, Ont. — United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agree- 
ment covering 620 empl. — settlement pay of $40; wage increases of 50 an hr. eff. Feb. 4, 1963, 
20 an hr. eff. Feb. 4, 1964 and 30 an hr. eff. Feb. 4, 1965; holiday pay plus time and one half 
(formerly straight-time) for work on paid holidays; rate for male labourer after Feb. 4, 1965 
will be $1.32 an hr. 



136 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Awards Made to Employers and to 

Handicapped Man and Woman of Year 

Saskatchewan honours employers with outstanding records in the employment of 
handicapped persons, and Newfoundland presents awards to the handicapped man 
and woman who have shown the most fortitude in overcoming their disabilities 



For the second time, Lieutenant-Governor 
Frank Bastedo of Saskatchewan has pre- 
sented awards to employers with outstanding 
records in the employment of handicapped 
persons. 

Receiving citations this year were B. Lil- 
ley Drapers and Western Clay Products, 
both of Regina, and Canadian Pittsburg 
Limited of Moose Jaw. The presentations 
took place during the annual congress of 
the Council on Rehabilitation (Saskatch- 
ewan) in Regina. 

* * * * 

In Newfoundland, the Mr. and Mrs. 
C. A. Pippy awards to "the Handicapped 
Man and Woman of the Year" for 1962 
went to Dorothy Letto of Forteau, Labrador, 
and William Lane of St. John's, Nfld. Each 
of the awards, which were made for the 
first time in 1961, consists of $500 and a 
plaque donated by the Newfoundland Re- 
habilitation Council. They are presented to 
the handicapped man and woman who show 
the greatest fortitude in overcoming their 
disabilities. 

Miss Letto contracted polio at the age of 
six. The next 28 years were spent in and 
out of hospital undergoing the medical and 
surgical treatment required to get her out 
of her wheel chair and to the place where 
she can now get about and climb stairs with 
her crutches. In 1959 she applied for train- 
ing in commercial work. She did not have 
the Grade X diploma required for this 
course; so, at the age of 35, she went back 
to school and obtained her diploma in 
1960, and then went on to complete a 
commercial course. She is now employed 
as a clerk-typist at the Grenfell Hospital 
at St. Anthony. 

Mr. Lane, a young man of 22, was 
working as a watch repairman when he was 
stricken by arthritis. He was confined to 
hospital for eight years and spent another 
seven learning to walk again with crutches 
after he was fitted with metal joints when 
other methods failed. In 1951 he started 
his own watch repair business, working in 
a standing position at a high bench. In 
1954 he devised and installed hand controls 
in his car to enable him to drive to night 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 

64193-6—3 



school. In two years he completed Grades 
IX, X and XI with honours and then 
entered Memorial University. 

To finance his education, he worked dur- 
ing his vacation and took a year off from 
his studies to act as a rehabilitation officer 
with the Department of Health. Incidentally, 
it was from him that Miss Letto learned of 
the opportunities available for handicapped 
persons to receive training. 

Despite a period in hospital for surgery 
for an ulcer, Mr. Lane was graduated with 
a Bachelor of Science degree in 1961. Since 
that time he has been employed as a 
mathematics instructor in the Vocational 
Training Institute. He plans to do post- 
graduate work in biology. 

New Research Group in N.B. 

A doctor's request for assistance for a 
patient completely paralysed except for his 
head and shoulders has led to the forma- 
tion of a research group in New Brunswick. 

Dr. Lynn C. Bashow, Medical Director 
of Forest Hill Rehabilitation Centre in 
Fredericton, sought technical assistance to 
develop a means for the patient to control 
a battery-operated wheel chair and thus 
gain a measure of self-sufficiency. 

Faculty members and students in engineer- 
ing and physical education at the Univer- 
sity of New Brunswick joined with persons 
from the manufacturing industry to solve 
the problem. After they had solved it they 
decided to form a permanent organization 
to carry out research into ways of helping 
persons with severe leg and arm disabilities. 

Chairman of the group is Robert N. 
Scott, assistant professor of electrical en- 
gineering at the University. 

Saskatchewan Co-Ordinator of Rehabilitation 

Hon. A. M. Nicholson, Minister of Social 
Welfare and Rehabilitation, Saskatchewan, 
has announced the appointment of G. Roland 
Hennessey as Provincial Co-ordinator of 
Rehabilitation to succeed Dr. G. Allan 
Roeher. Dr. Roeher recently accepted the 
position of Executive Director of the Cana- 
dian Association for Retarded Children. 



137 



Older Workers 



U.S. National Council on the Aging 

Education and retraining stressed as key factors in solutions to many of the 
problems of older workers by speakers at the Council's 12th annual meeting 



Speakers at the 12th Annual Meeting of 
the National Council on the Aging in New 
York last November repeatedly stressed 
that education and retraining were key 
factors in successful solutions to many of 
the problems of older workers. 

Automation and the Older Worker 
Edwin F. Shelley, Vice President, U.S. 
Industries, Inc., and chairman of the Coun- 
cil's Subcommittee on Technological Change 
and the Older Worker, stated there was a 
pressing requirement for the retraining of 
workers— particularly of older workers— to 
perform new jobs when they had been 
automated out of their old jobs. This 
brought up the fundamental question of the 
educational background which a worker 
must possess if he was to be successfully 
retrained in later life. This, in turn, leads 
to consideration of the long-range require- 
ment that members of society must be 
educated in the attitudes needed to ensure 
continued learning throughout a lifetime. 

Mr. Shelley said that his subcommittee 
had considered the promising idea that 
rapidly developing technology might be 
directed along lines that would ensure the 
constructive use of citizens throughout their 
productive life, at their proper levels of 
capability, and with due consideration for 
the value of their experience, as well as 
for their physical limitations. 

Mr. Shelley suggested that with the 
proper use of computers, of new high-speed 
communication systems and of highly auto- 
matic robot-operated manufacturing pro- 
cedures, it could be possible to decentralize 
the operation of many commercial and 
industrial organizations. This would permit 
employees to work in small centres near 
their homes, or even, in some cases, in 
their homes, and still maintain highly cen- 
tralized communication and production 
control. This could permit the effective use 
of different employees at different times of 
the day, and for different periods each week 
or month. Part-time work could be con- 
ducted on a highly efficient basis, and, in 
a properly organized company, an older 
worker's experience could well be worth as 
much money as a younger worker's energy. 
Seniority 
Ralph Helstein, President, United Pack- 
inghouse, Food and Allied Workers, ex- 
plained that seniority establishes a principle 
that length of service with a company 



138 



measures the individual worker's relative 
claim to a job. Rules of seniority and 
protection against arbitrary discharge were 
probably the most effective practices unions 
had developed to protect the job security 
of long-service employees and older work- 
ers, he pointed out. 

Mr. Helstein stated that, despite con- 
siderable success in the application of 
seniority rules, new problems now facing 
the labour movement' require revision in 
many seniority concepts. The economic and 
social challenges of automation had wide- 
sweeping implications and their most avail- 
able victim was the older worker. 

He said: "I believe seniority concepts 
must be adapted in such a way that they 
will help cushion the effects of automation 
upon the older worker. For some time now 
I have felt the need to change from the 
practice of job or department seniority to, 
at least, plant seniority, and in the case 
of multi-plant companies, to a company- 
wide system. It may even be necessary 
to consider industry-wide seniority, and 
perhaps, even more important, intra-indus- 
try seniority on a geographic basis. All 
this needs to be done because it is essential 
to save jobs for the older workers who are 
less able to adapt or for whom the adapta- 
tion process would be an especially difficult 
one, and for whom mobility is a very grave 
problem." 

Dr. Philip Taft, professor of economics 
at Brown University, stated that attempts 
to widen the application of seniority so as 
to protect older workers were likely to face 
opposition, not only from employers, but 
also from workers who were members of 
the union. Reaction of workers to the appli- 
cation of widened seniority rules was likely 
to be influenced by the number of workers 
employed in the plant to which the transfer 
was to be made. 

Retirement 

John L. Hawn, Manager, Compensation 
and Personnel Practices, Monsanto Chemical 
Company and chairman of the Council's 
Subcommittee on Criteria for Retirement, 
submitted a preliminary report on an index 
for retirement. He explained that an attempt 
was being made to develop a retirement 
index which could be used to determine 
at what age people should retire. Objective 
criteria, other than age, were needed in 
arriving at retirement decisions, he said. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



Women's Bureau 



Women in High Positions in U.S. Government 

Study to determine factors contributing to women executives' rise to positions 
of authority, and one of all U.S. government executives, make possible some 
interesting comparisons. Women occupy less than 2 per cent of executive jobs 



A study of a representative sample of 
women executives in the United States 
Government* to determine the factors that 
had contributed to their rise to positions 
of authority, together with a larger survey 
of all U.S. government executives, provides 
some interesting comparisons between men 
and women in the civil service. The 145 
women in the sample comprised about 25 
per cent of all women in the federal civil 
service who in 1959 were in "top level 
positions"; receiving a salary of $11,355 
or more a year. 

Although for the previous few years 
women had made up about a quarter of the 
federal civil service, in 1959 they held less 
than 2 per cent of all high executive posi- 
tions, a proportion considerably higher, 
however, than at comparable levels in indus- 
try. Eighty-eight per cent of the women 
were in the two lowest grades included in 
the sample; of the 12 per cent in higher 
grades only three women were in "political" 
positions close to the very top. 

Where they were — The most promising 
starting opportunities for women were 
found to have been in the fields of social 
security, child welfare, public assistance 
and vocational rehabilitation, all traditional 
areas of specialization for women. 

More than one out of every three women 
executives were in two agencies, the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare and 
the Department of Labor. In proportion to 
their total numbers, women were more 
highly represented than men in the Depart- 
ments of State, Justice and Agriculture, 
and in the Executive Office of the President, 
and the Civil Service Commission. 

Their background — The family, occupa- 
tional and geographic origins of the women 
executives showed little significant difference 
from those of their male counterparts. Nor 
was there any clear difference between men 
and women in the percentage of American 
and foreign born. The women were pre- 
dominantly from middle and upper middle 
class families. 

Their education — There were some in- 
teresting educational differences; for exam- 
ple, two fifths of the women, in contrast 

•Women Executives in the American Federal Gov- 
ernment, by W. Lloyd Warner, Paul P. VanRiper, 
Norman H. Martin and Orvis F. Collins. Public 
Personnel Review, October 1962. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 

64193-6— 3* 



to one quarter of the men, had gone on 
to receive master's degrees. And a higher 
proportion of women had proceeded to 
the doctoral level. The calibre of the univer- 
sities attended was essentially similar for 
both sexes. 

Their career paths — The greatest number, 
61 per cent, of women executives had begun 
their working life in a profession, more 
than one quarter of them as teachers. 
Medicine, law and the behavioural sciences 
were the fields in which 14 per cent of the 
women executives had begun. Of those who 
had begun in the other professions, which 
accounted for 19 per cent of the total, 
most had been journalists, public relations 
people or nurses. Only a few had begun 
in the natural sciences or engineering. About 
25 per cent had begun in the clerical field. 
Since most women in the civil service are 
in clerical work, it is obvious that few of 
them manage to rise above that level. 

In moving primarily through the ranks 
of the professions, women had followed a 
usual pattern among federal executives. 
This pattern is a major distinction, however, 
of the career routes of government execu- 
tives compared with those in business. 

Their mobility — In the search for oppor- 
tunity, only 2 per cent of the women, in 
contrast to 13 per cent of the men, had 
remained in one organization. Nearly three 
quarters of the women but only a little 
over half of the men had gained experience 
in four or more separate organizations. 

Their age and marital status — Women 
executives at all levels were slightly older 
than is typical of government executives in 
general. At the highest levels women execu- 
tives were considerably older than the 
average. 

Two thirds of the women were unmarried, 
compared with less than 5 per cent of the 
total of civilian executives. 

Why they succeeded — Since the women 
who have risen to top level positions have 
done so without exceptional advantages of 
birth, occupation or geographic origin, the 
report concludes that energy and singleness 
of purpose were responsible for their suc- 
cess. They had acquired superior educa- 
tional qualifications and had shown both 
tenacity of purpose and a high degree of 
adaptability in moving from one position 
to another. 



139 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



ILO Committee of Experts on Social Security 



During a two-week meeting in December, 
the ILO Committee of Experts on Social 
Security concluded that benefits in the case 
of industrial accidents and occupational dis- 
eases should form the object both of a new 
Convention and a Recommendation, but 
that any new Convention should be confined 
to setting forth broad principles and general 
resolutions and should avoid detailed pro- 
visions which would tend to render it rigid 
and constitute obstacles to wide ratification. 
The subject is on the agenda of the 1963 
Session of the International Labour Con- 
ference. 

Chairman of the meeting was J. W. Wil- 
lard, Deputy Minister of Welfare, Canada. 

The Committee pronounced itself in fav- 
our of a complete remodelling of Conven- 
tions concerning old-age, invalidity and 
survivors' pensions that were developed 
before the Second World War, so as to 
bring the international standards into line 
with postwar developments of national 
schemes. The Committee was of the opinion 
that the new instrument should take the 
form of a Convention, which may be supple- 
mented by a Recommendation, and should 
be considered as replacing all the pre-war 
Conventions. 



Social Security Planning 

The Committee approached the examina- 
tion of social security planning and imple- 
mentation in developing countries by a 
general discussion on the place of social 
security within the framework of a general 
plan for economic and social development 
and the part it could play as a factor of 
progress and of social balance. 

The experts noted that from a strictly 
economic viewpoint it may be said that 
social security measures represent ultimately 
a fraction of the country's general resources 
devoted to consumption and that, conse- 
quently, could receive only a low degree 
of priority. The Committee recognized, how- 
ever, that social security — when properly 
conceived and co-ordinated — has a favour- 
able influence on increasing the worker's 
efficiency and stability, which in turn could 
promote productivity, so contributing to 
economic progress. 

The Committee made a thorough exam- 
ination of the resolution concerning the 
expansion of ILO activities for the advance- 
ment of social security adopted by the 
International Labour Conference at its June 
1962 session. 



Committee on Conditions of Work in Fishing Industry 



The ILO Committee on Conditions of 
Work in the Fishing Industry, which met 
on December 10 to 19, drafted a proposed 
international instrument concerning accom- 
modation on board fishing vessels, without 
stating the form such an instrument should 
take. The Committee includes about 30 
government, employer and worker members 
and technical advisers from countries of 
chief importance in the fishing industry, 
namely, India, Japan, Norway, Peru, United 
States and U.S.S.R. 

The proposed instrument has been based 
on a 1949 Convention concerning Crew 
Accommodation on Board Ship, which was 
not made applicable to vessels engaged in 
fishing. 

The Committee adopted a resolution 
pointing out that fishing vessels have, to all 
intents and purposes, been excluded from 



international instruments concerning safety 
of life at sea. It recommended the prepara- 
tion of an International Code of Practice 
for dealing with the navigational, opera- 
tional and occupational aspects of the 
subject. 

The Committee stressed that fishermen 
were exposed to the risk of industrial acci- 
dents and occupational diseases giving rise 
to the need for medical care and causing 
loss of income. It set forth certain prin- 
ciples to ensure full protection of fishermen 
in cases of industrial accidents and occupa- 
tional diseases. The Committee also invited 
the ILO Governing Body to put these prin- 
ciples before the International Labour Con- 
ference when it discusses, at its 1963 session, 
benefits in the case of industrial accidents 
and occupational diseases. 



140 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



David Archer, President of the Ontario 
Federation of Labour, told the recent 
Labour-Management Committee Confer- 
ence in Kitchener, Ont., that any manage- 
ment man who says unions are not interested 
in Canada's economic future is as stupid 
and uninformed as a union member who 
says management isn't interested in Canada's 
economy. 

Mr. Archer was most emphatic about the 
extent of assistance that labour is ready to 
provide to promote this country's welfare — 
but he insisted that co-operation between 
labour and management must be the equal 
participation of equal parties. "We realize 
that if we are to survive in this highly 
competitive world we must work together. 
This is a fight for economic survival and 
working people have a real stake in this 
struggle," he said. 

Mr. Archer pointed out that most people 
cite Sweden as the successful middle way 
between totalitarian communism and un- 
controlled capitalism. He suggested that 
Sweden's success is due in no small part 
to the fact that its work force is 90 per 
cent organized so that labour speaks with 
authority. "This is what I mean by co-opera- 
tion between equals," he said. 

The speaker urged the conference dele- 
gates to remember that there was every- 
thing to gain by such co-operation. "It is 
the kind of co-operation the federal Govern- 
ment has been trying to encourage for 
years at the plant level through its labour- 
management committees," he said. 

During one of the three panel discussions, 
Otto W. Klinck, industrial relations manager 
of Naugatuck Chemicals Ltd., Elmira, Ont., 
stated that rather than usurp management 
rights and functions, labour-management 
committees help management to perform 
its functions. 

Mr. Klinck's observation was supported 
by Matthew K. Carson, Toronto, national 
executive board member of the Canadian 
Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and 
General Workers. Mr. Carson also lamented 
the fact that, except where a plant has a 
labour-management committee, employer 
and employees are "almost strangers" when 
they sit down to negotiate their collective 
bargaining agreement. He recommended 
that senior management representatives 
should serve on LMCs so that decisions 



could be reached and action taken on 
those decisions. 

Another union spokesman, Frank Benn, 
Kitchener district representative of the 
United Packinghouse Workers of America, 
stated that joint consultation committees 
help break down the mistrust that often 
exists between labour and management. 
"Very few union bargaining committees are 
prepared to accept at face value the state- 
ments made by management over the bar- 
gaining table. The exceptions are where 
there is an active labour-management com- 
mittee at work," he said. 

Gordon Braniff, personnel manager at 
Collingwood Shipyards, pointed out that 
morale is always seriously affected when a 
new man walks in. "We should be open 
to change — ready to recognize that change 
in oneself is slow," he recommended. 

Murray Cotterill, Canadian publicity 
director for the United Steelworkers of 
America, claimed that in some areas 
management still denies workers the right to 
organize into trade unions. He urged that a 
more active interest be shown toward labour- 
management committees by "top manage- 
ment above the personnel manager level." 

One management spokesman, Harold 
Swanson of Silverwood Dairies, Woodstock, 
Ont., suggested that employee ideas be 
"given a whirl" even if management thinks 
they'll be too costly or won't work. 

Charles Weir, Kitchener, bargaining com- 
mittee chairman of the Canadian Brother- 
hood of Railway, Transport and General 
Workers, representing Public Utilities Com- 
mission transportation employees, reported 
PUC's labour-management committee had 
done away with much dissatisfaction. 

On the subject of plant communications, 
Fred Thwaites, personnel manager of Somer- 
ville Industries Ltd., London, Ont., stated 
his company is a firm believer that "an 
informed employee is a better employee," 
and strongly recommended the use of LMCs 
as a two-way communications medium be- 
tween labour and management. 

Leonard Bruder of Kitchener, interna- 
tional representative of the United Rubber 
Workers of America, observed that the 
attitudes of union people are largely deter- 
mined by management through the relations 
management has with its employees. 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres, who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
films. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



141 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for two days during December. The Board 
issued four certificates designating bargain- 
ing agents, ordered two representation votes, 
rejected one application for certification, 
and granted one application for revocation 
of certification. During the month the Board 
received three applications for certification 
and two applications for revocation of cer- 
tification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of employees in various clerical 
and manual classifications employed by the 
Canadian National Railways, Montreal, 
Que. (L.G., Sept. 1962, p. 1033). The 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, the Brother- 
hood of Maintenance of Way Employees 
and the International Longshoremen's Asso- 
ciation had intervened. (See story below). 

2. Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers Local No. 91 of the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of mail truck drivers em- 
ployed by Rod Service (Ottawa) Limited, 
Ottawa, Ont. (L.G., Jan., p. 47). 

3. Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc., 
on behalf of a unit of deck officers employed 
aboard the S.S. Dolomite by Law Quarries 
Transportation Limited, Port Colborne, 
Ont. (L.G., Jan., p. 47). 

4. District 50, United Mine Workers of 
America, Local 13946, on behalf of a unit 
of building cleaners and maintenance men 
employed by Central Mortgage and Hous- 
ing Corporation at its Cloverdale Park 
Project in Pierrefonds, Que. (received during 
month). 

Representation Votes Ordered 

1. International Union, United Automo- 
bile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement 
Workers of America (UAW), Local 698, 



applicant, and Compagnie Nationale Air 
France, Montreal, Que., respondent (reser- 
vations agents) (L.G., Jan., p. 46) (Return- 
ing Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

2. P. G. Robertson, H. R. Douglas, et al, 
applicants, Trans-Canada Air Lines, Mont- 
real, Que., respondent, and International 
Association of Machinists, respondent. The 
Board ordered a vote following considera- 
tion of an application for revocation of 
certification affecting a unit of production 
planners (L.G., Jan., p. 47) (Returning 
Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

Application for Certification Rejected 

Taggart Employees Association, applicant, 
and Taggart Service Limited, Ottawa, Ont., 
and Inaerco Limited, Perth, Ont., respond- 
ents (L.G., Jan., p. 47). The application was 
rejected for the reason that the applicant 
failed to establish to the satisfaction of the 
Board that any of the employees affected 
were members in good standing in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Section 15 of 
the Board's Rules of Procedure. In the 
Board's view they had not paid on their 
own behalf the Association's application or 
admission fee in an amount at least equal 
to one month's dues. 

Application for Revocation Granted 

The Board granted an application for 
revocation of certification affecting Gerald 
Franklyne, Eric Armstrong, et al, applicants, 
Tippet- Richardson (Ottawa) Limited, re- 
spondent, and Canadian Brotherhood of 
Railway, Transport and General Workers, 
respondent (received during month). 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. District 50, United Mine Workers of 
America, Local 13946, on behalf of a unit 
of building cleaners and maintenance men 
employed by Central Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation at its Cloverdale Park Project 
in Pierrefonds, Que. (Investigating Officer: 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



142 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



R. L. Fournier) (see "Applications for 
Certification Granted," above). 

2. District 50, United Mine Workers of 
America, Local 13946, on behalf of a unit 
of drivers and warehousemen employed by 
McClure Transport Ltd., Edmundston, N.B. 
(Investigating Officer: H. R. Pettigrove). 

3. General Truck Drivers Local Union 
No. 879, General Truck Drivers Local 
Union No. 938, and Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers Local No. 91 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers of America, on behalf of a unit of 
employees of Motorways (Ontario) Limited, 
Rexdale, Ont. (Investigating Officer: A. B. 
Whitfield). 

Applications for Revocation Received 

1. Gerald Franklyne, Eric Armstrong, et 
al, applicants, Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) 



Limited, respondent, and Canadian Brother- 
hood of Railway, Transport and General 
Workers, respondent. The application was 
for the revocation of the certification issued 
by the Board on November 14, 1960, to the 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport 
and General Workers in respect of a unit 
of employees of the company (L.G. 1961, 
p. 43) (see "Application for Revocation 
Granted," above). 

2. Lucien Jarraud, Germaine Buteau, et 
al, applicants, CJMS Radio Montreal Lim- 
ited (formerly La Bonne Chanson Inc.), 
respondent, and the National Association 
of Broadcast Employees and Technicians, 
respondent. The application was for the 
revocation of the certification issued by the 
Board on October 7, 1955, in respect of a 
unit of employees of the company employed 
at Radio Station CJMS (L.G. 1955, p. 1382). 



Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The branch 
also acts as the administrative arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board, in matters 
under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
which became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions, orders and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
works declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the provinces of Saskatch- 
ewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



143 



CLRB Certifies Bargaining Agent for 19,900 CNR Clerks 



The Canada Labour Relations Board on 
December 28 issued certification to the 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Trans- 
port and General Workers as the bargaining 
agent for a unit of employees of the 
Canadian National Railways comprising 
clerical employees (including stenographers 
and operators of office equipment) and a 
wide variety of classifications of manual 
workers, located in all provinces except 
Newfoundland. The Board had held an all- 
day hearing of the case on November 14, 
after which it reserved judgment. 

The application for certification affected 
one of the largest groups of workers ever 
involved in a representation case before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board since 
the inception of the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act in 1948. The 
case arose as a result of the extensive 
reorganization upon which the Canadian 
National Railways has embarked and is still 
engaged with a view to realigning its field 
management units into eighteen areas under 
five regional headquarters. 

The Board's decision affected approx- 
imately 19,930 employees of the railway, 
most of whom were members of long 
standing in the applicant Brotherhood, and 
who had been represented in collective 
bargaining by the Brotherhood under four 
separate collective agreements. 

The certification order gave to the appli- 
cant organization for the first time bar- 
gaining rights with respect to some 596 
employees previously represented by the 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, which 
union was an intervener in the proceedings. 
This group of employees were, generally 
speaking, employed in job classifications 
normally covered by collective agreements 



held by the Canadian Brotherhood of Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers. This 
group, usually referred to as "assistants" in 
railroad parlance, consists mainly of clerks, 
cashiers, ticket clerks, assistant agents, shed- 
men, and the like, employed in small or 
medium-sized stations. 

The Board's order, however, excluded 
from the Brotherhood's bargaining unit, 
among others, those employees on the 
entire CNR system who exercise train order 
skills and who handle telegraph message 
traffic, and who make up the main bulk 
of employees represented in collective bar- 
gaining by the Order of Railroad Tele- 
graphers. 

In addition, the newly created bargaining 
unit takes in some 456 employees not pre- 
viously represented by any trade union. 

Other intervening organizations in the 
proceedings were the Brotherhood of Main- 
tenance of Way Employees and the Inter- 
national Longshoremen's Association. Evi- 
dence presented to the Board indicated that 
the CBRT application for certification did 
not affect the membership or bargaining 
rights of these two unions. Where clarifica- 
tion seemed necessary, however, the Board 
directed minor amendments in the wording 
of the description of the bargaining unit 
in order to remove possible areas of doubt. 

In issuing the decision the Board told 
the parties that it wanted the officers of 
the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, the Order 
of Railroad Telegraphers and the Canadian 
National Railways to meet together and 
make every effort to implement the decision 
in a manner that would serve the best 
interests of the employees affected. 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During December 1962, the Minister of 
Labour appointed conciliation officers to 
deal with the following disputes: 

1. Capital Window Cleaners Limited 
(Halifax International Airport) and Local 
506 of the Building Service Employees' 
International Union (Conciliation Officer: 
D. T. Cochrane). 

2. Canadian National Hotels, Limited 
(Newfoundland Hotel, St. lohn's) and Local 
779 of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees' 



and Bartenders' International Union (Con- 
ciliation Officer: W. L. Taylor). 

3. Alaska Cruise Lines, Limited, Van- 
couver, and Seafarers' International Union 
of Canada (Conciliation Officer: D. S. 
Tysoe). 

Settlements Reported by Conciliation Officers 

1. Northern Wings Limited, Sept-Iles, 
Que., and Lodge 767 of the International 
Association of Machinists (Conciliation 
Officer: C. E. Poirier) (L.G., Jan., p. 48). 



144 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



2. National Harbours Board (Port Col- 
borne Grain Elevator) and Port Colborne 
Grain Elevator Workers Union, Local 1015, 
International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers (Conciliation Officer: T. B. 
McRae) (L.G., Oct. 1962, p. 1149). 

3. Viking Tugboat Co. Ltd., Vancouver, 
and Marine Engineers Local 425 of the 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Trans- 
port and General Workers (Conciliation 
Officer: G. R. Currie) (L.G., July 1962, 
p. 835). 

4. Vancouver Barge Transportation Lim- 
ited and Marine Engineers Local 425 of 
the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers (Concilia- 
tion Officer: G. R. Currie )(L.G., July 
1962, p. 836). 

Conciliation Board Appointed 

The Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway Company, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 
and Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
(L.G., Oct. 1962, p. 1149). 

Conciliation Boards fully Constituted 

1. The Board of Conciliation and Investi- 
gation established in December 1962 to 
deal with a dispute between The Algoma 
Central and Hudson Bay Railway Company, 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and Brotherhood 



of Railroad Trainmen (see above) was 
fully constituted in December 1962 with 
the appointment of W. H. Dickie of 
Toronto as Chairman. Mr. Dickie was 
appointed by the Minister on the joint 
recommendation of the other two members 
of the Board, R. V. Hicks, Q.C., of Toronto, 
and the Honourable A. W. Roebuck, Q.C., 
of Ottawa, who were previously appointed 
on the nomination of the company and 
union, respectively. 

2. The Board of Conciliation and Investi- 
gation established in November 1962 to 
deal with a dispute between Canadian 
National Hotels Limited (Chateau Laurier 
Hotel, Ottawa) and Canadian Brotherhood 
of Railway, Transport and General Workers 
(L.G., Jan., p. 48) was fully constituted 
in December 1962 with the appointment 
of W. H. Dickie of Toronto as Chairman. 
Mr. Dickie was appointed by the Minister 
on the joint recommendation of the other 
two members of the Board, R. V. Hicks, 
Q.C., and C. H. Millard, both of Toronto, 
who were previously appointed on the 
nomination of the company and union, 
respectively. 

Settlement Reached before Board Constituted 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited, Van- 
couver, and Canadian Air Line Pilots Asso- 
ciation (L.G., Oct. 1962, p. 1149). 



Jamaica Becomes 105th ILO Member Country 



Jamaica, which was admitted to the 
United Nations on September 18, 1962, 
became a member of the International 
Labour Organization late in December. 

In a letter to David A. Morse, Director- 
General of the International Labour Office, 
Alexander Bustamente, Prime Minister and 
Minister of External Affairs of Jamaica, 
declared his government's formal acceptance 
of the obligations of the Constitution of 
the International Labour Organization. This 
is the only requirement for countries who 
are U.N. members. 



The letter also stated that Jamaica re- 
mains bound by the obligations of 15 
International Labour Conventions the pro- 
visions of which had previously been 
accepted on behalf of Jamaica by the 
United Kingdom. In addition, the Govern- 
ment of Jamaica undertakes to continue 
to apply all other Conventions previously 
ratified by the United Kingdom and whose 
provisions are fully applied in Jamaica. 

The admission of Jamaica brings to 105 
the number of ILO member countries. 



CORRECTION— The item at the bottom of Column 2, page 1236 of the November 
1962 number was not entirely correct. The unions that remain in the Brandon Union 
Group (not the "Brandon Hall Group" as stated) are a local of the Carpenters and 
two locals, plasterers and cement masons (not United Cement Workers' Union), of the 
Operative Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Union. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

64193-&— 4 



• FEBRUARY 7963 



145 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



Supreme Court of Canada upholds B.C. Labour Relations Board's certification of 
successor union. Manitoba Court of Appeal rules on effect of Section 46A of 
Manitoba Labour Relations Act. Saskatchewan appeal court upholds provincial 
certification order affecting company under contract to federal corporation 



The Supreme Court of Canada, allowing 
an appeal from the British Columbia Court 
of Appeal, ruled that the Labour Relations 
Board had power under Section 65 (2) of 
the Labour Relations Act to vary a certifi- 
cation order by naming a successor union 
as a bargaining agent without compelling 
decertification and certification proceedings 
under Sections 10 and 12 of the Act. 

In Manitoba, the Court of Appeal, 
in answering questions submitted by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council regarding 
Section 46A of the Manitoba Labour Rela- 
tions Act, held that trade unions and 
employers' organizations would not be liable 
for damages for unauthorized or unsanc- 
tioned acts of their members in breach of 
the Act or a collective agreement. It would 
be open to the courts to determine, how- 
ever, considering the facts and circumstances 
of each case, whether or not conduct in 
breach of the Act or a collective agreement 
was authorized, aided or abetted by an 
employers' organization or a trade union. 

In Saskatchewan, the Court of Appeal 
upheld a certification order issued by the 
Saskatchewan Labour Relations Board re- 
garding the employees of a company under 
contract to a federal Crown corporation, 
holding that, as the company's activities did 
not constitute an integral part of, or were 
necessarily incidental to, the work of the 
Crown corporation, they did not fall within 
the jurisdiction of the Canada Labour Rela- 
tions Board under the I.R.D.I. Act. 

Supreme Court of Canada... 

. . .roles Board may vary certification order by 
substituting successor union as bargaining agent 

On November 14, 1962, the Supreme 
Court of Canada, allowing an appeal from 
a judgment of the British Columbia Court 
of Appeal, held that under the B.C. Labour 



Relations Act the Labour Relations Board 
has power to substitute in a certification 
order a new union for unions which the 
former has succeeded in substance and 
interest. 

In July 1952, nine locals of the Fruit 
and Vegetable Workers Union were cer- 
tified for a unit employed by 23 employers 
in 30 plants in the fruit and vegetable 
packing industry in the Okanagan Valley. 
Later, the unions changed their name and 
merged with a new union — the B.C. Interior 
Fruit and Vegetable Workers Union, Local 
No. 1572. Then Local 1572 requested the 
Labour Relations Board to change the name 
in the certification order from locals of 
the old union to that of the new union. The 
application stated that the reason for appli- 
cation was "merger and change of name." 

Regulation 9 (a), made under the author- 
ity of Section 63 of the Labour Relations 
Act, provides a procedure on applications 
to the Board under Section 65 (2) of the 
Act where a trade union desires a change 
of name on a certificate due to merger or 
other circumstances. The Board, being satis- 
fied that the employees in the unit desired 
the requested change, issued, in May 1959, 
a "Variation of Certificate" order by which 
the certification order of July 1952 was 
varied by deleting the names "Fruit and 
Vegetable Workers Unions, Locals Nos. 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 11" and inserting 
in their place the name "B.C. Interior Fruit 
and Vegetable Workers Union, Local No. 
1572." 

Oliver Co-operative Growers Exchange, 
one of the companies involved, challenged 
the petition before the Board, contending 
that the petition involved not a mere 
change of name of a continuing entity, but 
the substitution of one entity for another as 
the bargaining representative for the unit; it 
submitted that this could be done only under 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



146 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



Sections 10 and 12 of the Act by proceed- 
ings for decertification of the appointed 
entity and certification of the new. Later 
the company moved for a writ of certiorari 
to quash the varying order on the ground 
that the Board had acted without jurisdic- 
tion. 

Mr. Justice Brown of the British Columbia 
Supreme Court dismissed the motion and 
upheld the Board's order on the ground 
that, under Section 65 (2), the Board had 
jurisdiction to vary a certificate by sub- 
stituting one union for another without 
going through the process of decertification 
and certification under Sections 10 and 12 
of the Act (L.G., Jan. 1962, p. 76). 

On appeal, the British Columbia Court 
of Appeal, by a majority decision, quashed 
the Board's order and held that the sections 
of the Act dealing with certification were 
special provisions of mandatory character 
and, as such, the Board could not detract 
from them by usinr; its general powers 
(L.G., July 1962, p. 859). 

In the Supreme Court of Canada, Mr. 
Justice Judson, in his reasons for judgment, 
stated that the issue before the Court was 
to decide whether the Board had power 
to vary the certification order in question 
under Section 65 (2) of the Act, which 
reads: 

S. 65 (2). The Board may, upon the petition 
of any employer, employers' organization, trade 
union, or person, or of its own motion, recon- 
sider any decision or order made by it under 
this Act, and may vary or revoke any such 
decision or order. 

Further, Mr. Justice Judson noted that 
the majority in the Court of Appeal held 
that the Board's power under Section 65 (2) 
and Reg. 9 (a) was limited to the substitu- 
tion ' of a new name for an old one and 
that the word "vary" in Section 65 (2) 
could not support the substitution of another 
union for that set out in a certificate of 
bargaining authority. That would amount 
to a new and different certification, a 
replacement of one union by another, a 
change that could be brought about only 
by following the procedure laid down by 
Sections 10 and 12. The decision of the 
Court of Appeal was that Local 1572, being 
a new union, should have applied for cer- 
tification and not variation of an existing 
certificate and that variation of a certificate 
in the circumstances of this case was 
beyond the powers of the Board. 

Also, Mr. Justice Judson noted that the 
judge of first instance and Mr. Justice 
Davey in the Court of Appeal were of a 
contrary opinion and held that the Board 
had jurisdiction under Section 65 (2) of 
the Act. And this, in his opinion, was the 
correct view to take of the Act. 



The gist of the decision of Mr. Justice 
Davey, with which Mr. Justice Judson fully 
agreed, was that it was unnecessary to pro- 
ceed under Sections 10 and 12 and that the 
certification procedures under these sections 
were appropriate when a union seeks initial 
certification or contending unions seek cer- 
tification, but not in the case of a successor 
union resulting from a merger or reorganiza- 
tion. Further, Mr. Justice Davey held that 
Section 65 (2) conferred upon the Board 
an entirely independent power to vary or 
revoke a former order in appropriate cir- 
cumstances and that this included power 
to deal with cases not specifically provided 
for by the Act and which were outside the 
ordinary operation of Sections 10 and 12. 

In Mr. Justice Judson's opinion, this 
recognition of a plenary independent power 
of the Board under Section 65 (2) was 
supported by two prior decisions, that of 
Mr. Justice Clyne on the British Columbia 
Act in In Re Hotel and Restaurant Em- 
ployees' International Union (L.G. 1954, p. 
561), and that of Chief Justice McRuer 
and the Court of Appeal in Reg. v. Ont. 
Labour Relations Board; Ex parte Genaire 
Ltd., (L.G. 1958, p. 1291 and L.G. 1959, 
p. 738), where the corresponding section 
of the Ontario Labour Relations Act was 
considered. 

In his view, it was a very necessary power 
to enable the Board to do its work effi- 
ciently and the case under review afforded 
an illustration of the need for it. Employees 
in a certain industry, organized in nine 
locals, decided to combine in one local of 
a new union, performing the same function 
as the fragmented union and presenting a 
continuity of interest, property, manage- 
ment, representation and personnel. When 
the Board received an application by a 
successor union, no useful purpose would 
be served by compelling decertification pro- 
ceedings for the nine old locals and an 
application for certification of the new local 
1572 when all this could be done on notice 
to the interested parties under Section 
65 (2). The essential problem before the 
Board was one of representation of a group 
of employees; Local 1572 was a new and 
different association of employees but it 
was a successor union. In the decision of 
the Board, there was no error in either fact 
or law on the face of the record. The matter 
was entirely for the Board's consideration 
within the exercise of its powers under 
Section 65 (2) of the Act. 

Finally, Mr. Justice Judson did not accept 
a suggestion that Reg. 9 (a) was an attempt 
by the Board to extend its jurisdiction 
beyond the Act. Section 65 (2) gives the 
Board power to vary or revoke any decision 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 

64193-6—41 



147 



or order. All that Reg. 9 (a) said was 
that the Board would consider the exercise 
of this power where "due to merger or 
other circumstances" a certified trade union 
changes its name from that which appears 
on the certificate. This, in Mr. Justice Jud- 
son's opinion, was not an attempt to legis- 
late by way of regulation in a manner not 
authorized by the Act. 

The Supreme Court, in a unanimous 
decision, set aside the judgment of the 
Court of Appeal, restored the judgment of 
the British Columbia Supreme Court, and 
upheld the validity of the Labour Relations 
Board's order varying the original order of 
certification. Oliver Co-operative Growers 
Exchange v. Labour Relations Board and 
Okanagan Federated Shippers Association 
and B.C. Interior Fruit and Vegetable 
Workers Union, Local 1572, (1962), 40 
W.W.R., Part 6, p. 333. 

Manitoba Court of Appeal . . . 

. . .holds unions and employers' organizations not 
liable for damages for members' unauthorized acts 

On October 19, 1962, in a reference 
under An Act for expediting the Decision 
of Constitutional and other Provincial Ques- 
tions, the Manitoba Court of Appeal held 
that Section 46A (1) and (2) of the Mani- 
toba Labour Relations Act does not impose 
liability for damages on an employers' 
organization or a trade union for unauthor- 
ized or unsanctioned conduct of its mem- 
bers in breach of the Act or a collective 
agreement. 

In 1962, the Manitoba Legislature enacted 
Section 46A of the Labour Relations Act, 
but stipulated that it should only come 
into force on a day fixed by proclamation.* 

The provisions of Section 46A are as 
follows : 

S. 46 A (1) Any employers' organization, 
trade union, employer, employee, or person 
who, 

(a) does, or authorizes, or aids or abets 
the doing of anything prohibited under 
this Act; or 

(b) fails to do anything required to be done 
under this Act; or 

(c) authorizes, or aids or abets in the failure 
to do anything required to be done under 
this Act; 

is liable for general or special damages, or 
both, to anyone who is injured or suffers dam- 
age by the act or failure. 

(2) A party to a collective agreement or 
any employer, employers' organization, or a 
trade union, that is bound by a collective agree- 
ment, who or which is in breach thereof, is 
liable for general or special damages, or both, 
and may be sued by any other party thereto 
or person bound thereby who is injured or 
suffers damage as a result of the breach. 



*Section 46A was proclaimed in force February 1, 
1963. 



148 



(3) For the purposes of suing or being 
sued as permitted under this Act, employers' 
organizations and trade unions are legal entities 
capable of suing or being sued. 

Pending proclamation of this section, 
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council sub- 
mitted to the Court a reference concerning 
the interpretation of Section 46A. 

The questions submitted to the Court 
were: 

1. Does Subsection (1) of Section 46 A . . . 
impose liability for damages on an em- 
ployers' organization or trade union for 
the conduct of any member . . . which 
constitutes a breach of the said Act where 
such conduct was not authorized by the 
employers' organization or trade union 
or where the employers' organization or 
trade union did not aid or abet such con- 
duct? 

2. Does Subsection (2) of said Section 46A 
. . . impose liability on an employers' 
organization or trade union with respect 
to a breach of a collective agreement 
made pursuant to the said Act where 
such breach is committed by a member of 
the employers' organization or of a trade 
union without the sanction of the said 
employers' organization or trade union? 

Mr. Justice Freedman, in his reasons for 
judgment, stressed the Court's difficult posi- 
tion in interpreting legislation which was 
not yet in force and in dealing with the 
questions in the abstract without a back- 
ground of facts against which the legisla- 
tion might be considered. He thought that 
the absence of facts was not a small matter, 
because whether or not a particular act 
or omission was "authorized" depended on 
the facts and circumstances of each case. 
The common law contains an extensive 
jurisprudence on the question of the liability 
of a principal for the act or omission of 
his agent. If the proposed legislation came 
into force, Mr. Justice Freedman added, 
there might well be cases in which con- 
troversy would exist as to whether some 
specific conduct of a member was "author- 
ized" by an employers' organization or trade 
union, as the case might be. Such con- 
troversy would have to be resolved on the 
facts of each case, considered in the light 
of the legal principles applicable thereto. 
For that purpose, resort to the common 
law would be legitimate and the court 
would have to determine whether the con- 
duct was or was not authorized. 

However, question No. 1 as submitted to 
the Court assumed that all issues of fact 
or of law as to whether conduct was 
authorized by the principal or aided or 
abetted by it had already been resolved and 
answered in the negative. 

That being so, the Court's answer was 
sought as to whether Subsection ( 1 ) of 
Section 46A imposed liability on an em- 
ployers' organization or trade union in cases 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



where the doing of the prohibited act was 
neither authorized by the employers' organi- 
zation or trade union nor aided or abetted 
by it. In other words, the question simply 
asked the Court whether the statute meant 
what it said. In Mr. Justice Freedman's 
opinion, the statute meant what it said and, 
accordingly, in the circumstances defined 
by the question, there would be no liability 
on the employers' organization or trade 
union. 

Mr. Justice Freedman observed that, when 
the question referred to the Court said 
that the conduct was not authorized, one 
was justified in assuming that neither was 
it ratified after the event. At common law, 
he added, a principal or master may some- 
times be held liable for an "unauthorized" 
act of his agent or servant. Under Section 
46A, however, vicarious liability on a prin- 
cipal — whether an employers' organization 
or a trade union — could arise only if the 
conduct was authorized by the principal or 
aided or abetted by it. 

Further, Mr. Justice Freedman reiterated 
that if the section should come into force 
and a case under it should arise, it would 
be open to the court to determine on the 
facts whether the conduct was authorized 
by the employers' organization or trade 
union, or aided or abetted by it. If it found 
that to be the case, the court could then 
hold the employers' organization or trade 
union liable. 

Regarding question No. 2, whether Sec- 
tion 46 A (2) imposed liability on an em- 
ployers' organization or trade union with 
respect to a breach of a collective agreement 
where such breach was committed by a 
member of the employers' organization or 
of a trade union without the sanction of the 
employers' organization or trade union, Mr. 
Justice Freedman was of the opinion that 
conduct which is unsanctioned by an em- 
ployers' organization or trade union was the 
same as conduct which is neither authorized 
by an employers' organization nor aided or 
abetted by it, and the reasoning applicable 
to Question No. 1 applied to Question No. 
2 as well. 

Mr. Justice Freedman's answer to both 
questions was in the negative. 

Mr.. Justice Guy, in his reasons for 
judgment, noted that the significant portion 
of the new Section 46 A is subsection (3), 
which makes trade unions and employers' 
organizations legal entities capable of suing 
or being sued. This status of a legal entity 
is only "For the purposes of suing or being 
sued as permitted under this Act . . ." which, 
in his opinion, was a more restricted status 
than that of a commercial corporation or 
comparable legal entity. Counsel for the 



Attorney-General and employers' associa- 
tions argued that, given a legal entity, unless 
an act of a member is authorized, aided, 
abetted, or sanctioned, the trade union or 
employers' organization cannot be fixed 
with liability for damages. 

Counsels for the labour councils ex- 
pressed the hope that the Attorney-General's 
views were correct but they were concerned 
with the problems involved in the expres- 
sions: "does . . . anything prohibited under 
this Act ... or fails to do anything required 
to be done under this Act." It was argued 
in this respect that a trade union, as such, 
is in its nature "amorphous" and it is diffi- 
cult to state with definitive accuracy whether 
or not a member of a union is the servant 
or agent of the union. At common law a 
principal may, in some circumstances, be 
liable for the unauthorized act of the agent, 
and concern was voiced that, as a legal 
entity, a trade union at common law might 
find itself in the same position. Also, in 
the case of a master and servant relation- 
ship, a similar result might ensue. 

Mr. Justice Guy was of the opinion that 
mere membership in a trade union does 
not, per se, make that member a servant 
or agent of the union any more than a 
shareholder in a corporation is automatically 
the servant or agent of the corporation for 
any particular purpose. Members of a union 
and shareholders of a corporation exist 
at all times, but the legal questions relating 
to master and servant, or principal or agent, 
do not arise unless circumstances are such 
that the relationship is created. 

The "legal entity" established by Sub- 
section (3) of Section 46A, Mr. Justice 
Guy continued, can do things only through 
servants or agents. Whether or not the 
relationship of master and servant or prin- 
cipal and agent exists is, of course, not 
subject to any inflexible rule but depends 
upon circumstances surrounding each par- 
ticular case and, in his opinion, neither of 
these relationships was involved in the ques- 
tions submitted. Further, he added that in 
his view the word "does" implied authoriza- 
tion, and a proper concept of the verb "to 
do," so far as the statute in question was 
concerned, embraced authorization, aiding, 
abetting, and sanctioning. 

In Mr. Justice Guy's opinion, both ques- 
tions submitted to the Court should be 
answered in the negative. 

Finally, Mr. Justice Guy added that 
the word "authorization" meant "in fact 
authorized." Whether or not a union has 
authorized, aided, abetted, or sanctioned 
an act by one of its members or, by tacit 
agreement amounting to acquiescence, or 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



149 



ratification, has done so, is always a question 
of fact for the unfettered consideration of 
the court in each case. 

The Court unanimously answered both 
questions in the negative and held that 
trade unions and employers' organizations 
are not liable under Section 46A for dam- 
ages for unauthorized or unsanctioned acts 
of their members in breach of the Labour 
Relations Act or a collective agreement. 
Reference re Labour Relations Act, S. 46 A, 
(1962), 40 W.W.R., Part 6, p. 354. 

Saskatchewan Court of Appeal . . . 

. . .rules that company under contract to work for 
federal corporation not subject to I.R.D.I. Act 

On July 13, 1962, the Saskatchewan Court 
of Appeal dismissed an application to quash 
a certification order issued by the Saskat- 
chewan Labour Relations Board and held 
that the fact that a company was under 
contract to a Crown corporation declared 
to be a work for the general advantage of 
Canada, and hence exclusively under federal 
jurisdiction, was not of itself sufficient to 
bring its activities under federal jurisdiction. 
In the absence of any material showing 
that the company's activities constituted 
an integral part of or were necessarily 
incidental to the work of the Crown cor- 
poration, it could not be said that the 
provincial Labour Relations Board erred 
in assuming jurisdiction to certify the 
respondent union as bargaining agent. 

Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited, 
a Crown corporation of the Dominion of 
Canada, operates a mining and drilling 
plant at Eldorado, Sask., for the purpose of 
producing, refining and treating uranium. 
The company was incorporated pursuant 
to the provisions of the Atomic Energy 
Control Act and, by Section 18 of the Act, 
was declared to be a work for the general 
advantage of Canada. Thus, by virtue of 
Section 92 (10) (c) of the B.N.A. Act, 
exclusive jurisdiction over the company 
rests with the Parliament of Canada and 
its labour-management relations are under 
the federal Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act (Section 53 (g)). 

Bachmeier Diamond and Percussion Drill- 
ing Co. Ltd., the appellant company, was 
under contract to Eldorado to do core and 
percussion drilling in the mine of Eldorado 
for the purpose of developing the known 
and exploring the unknown bodies of 
uranium ore. 

Local 913 of the Beaverlodge District of 
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union 
applied to the Saskatchewan Labour Rela- 
tions Board to be certified as the bargaining 
agent for the employees of the Bachmeier 
Diamond Company. The Board, in an order 



dated February 22, 1962, decided that 
diamond drillers, including runners and 
helpers employed by the company, con- 
stituted an appropriate unit of employees 
for the purpose of bargaining collectively 
and that the local union represented a 
majority of the employees in the unit, and 
ordered the company to bargain collectively 
with the union. 

The company applied to the Court, in 
certiorari proceedings, to quash the cer- 
tification order. The application was based 
on the grounds that the Saskatchewan Board 
was without jurisdiction to make the order 
because of the provisions of Sections 91 
and 92 of the B.N.A. Act and because the 
work being done by the company had been 
declared to be work for the general advan- 
tage of Canada, and because of Section 
53 (g) and other provisions of the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act. 

The judgment of the Court was rendered 
by Mr. Justice Culliton, who noted that 
when the application for certification was 
made, the Saskatchewan Board had jurisdic- 
tion to determine whether the jurisdiction to 
certify the bargaining agent for the em- 
ployees of the company lay with it or with 
the Board constituted by the I.R.D.I. Act. 
This was a decision, however, collateral to 
the merits of the application and upon 
which the Board's jurisdiction depended. 
That being so, Mr. Justice Culliton con- 
tinued, the decision upon that preliminary 
question was open to review by a superior 
court, as the Board could not give itself 
jurisdiction by a wrong decision on this 
collateral matter. Moreover, in such review, 
the Court was entitled to look at the 
evidence taken before the Board and such 
additional evidence as it deemed relevant 
and admissible. 

In Mr. Justice Culliton's view, if it could 
be said that the employees of the drilling 
company were employed upon or in con- 
nection with the operation of any work, 
undertaking or business of Eldorado Mining 
and Refining Limited, then jurisdiction to 
certify the union in question would rest with 
the Board constituted under the Dominion 
legislation and not with the Board con- 
stituted by the Saskatchewan Trade Union 
Act. 

When the application for certification was 
made, the managing director of the drilling 
company contested the application, claiming 
that the operation of his company was under 
federal jurisdiction. He advised the Board 
that the work conducted by his company 
was underground diamond and percussion 
drilling under the direct supervision of the 
Eldorado Company. Later, in his affidavit 
before the Court, he elaborated on the 



150 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



relationship of his company with Eldorado 
and referred to an agreement of December 
13, 1961 between himself and the Eldorado 
Company by which he was required to do 
core and percussion drilling in the Eldorado 
mines for the purpose of developing and 
exploring bodies of uranium ore. Further, 
in the same agreement, he assigned with 
the approval of the Eldorado Company 
all his interest in the agreement to the 
drilling company in question. 

After reviewing the available evidence, 
Mr. Justice Culliton held that the evidence 
established only that the drilling company 
was under contract to Eldorado to do core 
and percussion drilling in the mine of 
Eldorado. The fact that the company was 
under contract to Eldorado was not of 
itself sufficient to bring the activities of 
that company under federal jurisdiction. 

To be subject to federal jurisdiction, the 
work of the company must form an integral 
part of or be necessarily incidental to the 
work, undertaking or business of Eldorado. 
This was made clear in the judgment of 
the Supreme Court of Canada in Reference 
re Validity of Industrial Relations and Dis- 
putes Investigation Act (L.G. 1955, p. 952). 



Consequently, the question before the Court 
was, did the evidence establish that the 
work of the company constituted an integral 
part of, or was necessarily incidental to the 
work, undertaking or business of, Eldorado? 

In Mr. Justice Culliton's opinion, it did 
not. Eldorado Company was incorporated 
for the purpose of producing, refining and 
treating uranium ore. There was nothing 
in the evidence to show that diamond and 
percussion drilling done by the drilling 
company was either an integral part of, or 
necessarily incidental to, the producing, re- 
fining or treatment of uranium ore. On the 
evidence available, the work of the drilling 
company was not such as to bring it within 
the ambit of the federal legislation or to 
say that the Saskatchewan Board erred in 
its decision. 

The Court dismissed the application to 
quash the Saskatchewan Labour Relations 
Board's certification order. Bachmeier Dia- 
mond and Percussion Drilling Co. Ltd. v. 
Beaverlodge District of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers' Local Union Number 913, 
(1962), 35 D.L.R. (2d), Parts 3 and 4, 
p. 241. 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

Ontario issues detailed safety rules for construction hoists; New Brunswick 
sets minimum rates for garment workers; Newfoundland lists designated trades 



In Ontario, comprehensive regulations 
were issued under the Construction Hoists 
Act, 1960-61, prescribing the qualifications 
of inspectors, hoist operators and attendants, 
arid laying down detailed safety standards 
for construction hoists. 

In New Brunswick, a minimum wage 
order for the garment industry set a 
minimum wage of 60 cents an hour for 
experienced workers, and of 50 cents for 
employees with less than nine months ex- 
perience in the industry. 

Other regulations dealt with apprentice- 
able trades in Newfoundland, and with hours 
of office and shop employees in smaller 
places in Saskatchewan. 

New Brunswick Minimum Wage Act 

A recent order of the New Brunswick 
Minimum Wage Board set a minimum wage 
of 60 cents an hour for experienced gar- 
ment workers, and of 50 cents for persons 
with less than nine months employment in 
the garment industry. Formerly, women in 
the industry were subject to the general 
minimum order for women, which sets a 



minimum rate of 60 cents an hour with no 
provision for learners' rates, and there was 
no minimum rate established for male 
workers. 

The new order covers all work in con- 
nection with the manufacturing of wearing 
apparel except footwear and headgear. 

The new minimum rates are based on 
a work week of 48 hours or less. Experi- 
enced workers must receive at least 90 
cents an hour for all time worked in excess 
of 48 hours in a week. The minimum 
overtime rate for inexperienced garment 
workers is 75 cents an hour. 

All employees in the garment industry 
must be paid at least twice a month. 

The order went into effect on January 1, 
and will remain in force until January 1, 
1964. 

Newfoundland Apprenticeship Act 

In Newfoundland, the Provincial Appren- 
ticeship Board has declared the following 
as designated trades for the purposes of 
the Apprenticeship Act, 1962: auto body 
repairer; bricklayer and mason; bricklayer 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



151 



and mason (pulp and paper mill); carpen- 
ter; carpenter (mining); carpenter (pulp 
and paper mill); diesel electric locomotive 
engineer (mining); diesel electric operating 
engineer; draftsman (pulp and paper mill). 

General electrician; electrician (mining); 
electrician (power company); electrician 
(pulp and paper mill); electrician armature 
winder (mining); electrician linesman (min- 
ing); electrician — Harland drive (pulp and 
paper mill). 

Forestry maintenance mechanic (pulp and 
paper mill); instrument mechanic (pulp and 
paper mill); joiner; linesman (power com- 
pany); machinist; machinist (mining); ma- 
chinist (power company); machinist (pulp 
and paper mill); maintenance mechanic 
(mining); maintenance mechanic (pulp and 
paper mill); millwright (pulp and paper 
mill); millwright (cement plant). 

Motor vehicle repairer; motor vehicle — 
diesel repairer (mining); motor vehicle — 
diesel repairer (pulp and paper mill); oper- 
ator (power company); painter (pulp and 
paper mill); patternmaker (pulp and paper 
mill). 

Pipefitter (mining); pipefitter (pulp and 
paper mill); plumber; plumber — domestic 
and plant (mining); sheetmetal worker; 
sheetmetal worker (mining); sheetmetal 
worker (pulp and paper mill); stationary 
operating engineer; welder (mining); and 
welder — iron worker (pulp and paper mill). 

Ontario Construction Hoists Act, 1960-61 

Ontario's first general regulations under 
the Construction Hoists Act, 1960-61 (L.G. 
1961, p. 1232), were gazetted December 1 
as O. Reg. 311/62. They came into force 
December 11. This Act, proclaimed Novem- 
ber 19, 1962 and amended in 1962, is the 
first provincial statute dealing exclusively 
with the safe operation of hoists used in 
the construction, alteration, maintenance or 
demolition of buildings and other structures. 

The Act makes the Department of Labour 
responsible for inspection, with some assist- 
ance from municipal inspectors. It prohibits 
the installation or major alteration of a 
construction hoist without prior approval 
of the departmental inspectorate, including 
approval of drawings and specifications if 
the hoist is used for hoisting or lowering 
men. 

A hoist must be inspected before it is 
put into operation, except that the Chief 
Inspector of the Elevator Inspection Branch 
may give permission for the temporary 
operation of a materials hoist until inspec- 
tion. Semi-annual inspections are required 
thereafter. 

No user of a construction hoist may 
permit it to be operated without a licence. 



Licences are valid for 12 months, unless 
suspended or cancelled by the Chief Inspec- 
tor. There is provision for an appeal to 
the Minister from an inspector's direction, 
or from the refusal of the Chief Inspector 
to grant a licence. 

The construction hoists regulations classify 
construction hoists as materials hoists and 
workmen's hoists, and prescribe the stand- 
dards that must be observed with respect 
to their location, design, use, operation, 
maintenance, and construction. They lay 
down requirements as to the form and 
substance of the drawings and specifications 
that must be submitted for departmental 
approval, and requirements concerning 
notification to the Department of proposed 
installations and alterations. 

The regulations prescribe the form and 
location of notices and markings that owners 
must keep in or about hoists; govern the 
conduct of persons in or about such hoists; 
provide for the issue, renewal, transfer and 
suspension of licences; and prescribe fees. 

The qualifications required of persons who 
may be appointed as inspectors and of 
hoist operators and attendants, are also set 
out in the regulations. 

The Chief Inspector may, on application, 
grant a hoist licence or permit the transfer 
of a licence, if he has no reason to believe 
that the hoist does not comply with the 
Act and the regulations, or that it will be 
operated in an unsafe manner, subject to 
certain additional conditions in regard to 
transfers. 

Suspension of Hoist Licence 

The Chief Inspector may suspend a hoist 
licence if he has reason to believe that: 
The hoist is being operated in contravention 
of the Act or regulations; a major altera- 
tion of the hoist has been started; the 
licensee is in arrears exceeding 14 days 
for any fee or other expense for which he 
is liable under the Act or regulations. 

A licence may also be suspended if the 
user has (1) failed to comply with a notice 
or order of the inspector, (2) failed to 
keep posted the Chief Inspector's rules 
informing workmen and other employers of 
safe procedures for the operation of the 
hoist, or (3) has failed to supervise work- 
men and other employers to secure com- 
pliance with the Act and regulations. 

Where the Chief Inspector suspends a 
licence, he must serve a notice on the 
licensee immediately, informing him of the 
reasons for, and the effective date of, the 
suspension. He must also provide the licen- 
see with a transcript of the provisions of 
the regulations setting out the conditions 
under which the licence may be reinstated. 



152 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



The licensee must then immediately return 
the licence to the Chief Inspector. A licence 
continues to be suspended until the Chief 
Inspector considers that the conditions 
resulting in the suspension have been 
remedied, and he makes a written order 
discontinuing the suspension; the licensee is 
entitled to a copy of this order. 

Qualifications for Inspectors, Operators and 
Attendants 

In setting out the qualifications for inspec- 
tors, the regulations specify a minimum age 
of 25 years for both Department of Labour 
and municipal inspectors. A candidate for 
appointment as a departmental inspector 
must be an engineer, or be able to show 
proof that he has had suitable training and 
experience in the design, construction, main- 
tenance or inspection of construction hoists 
or similar equipment, to make him com- 
petent to perform his duties. He must obtain 
a mark of not less than 60 per cent in 
the prescribed examinations. A municipal 
inspector making inspections under the Act 
must, upon request, satisfy the Chief In- 
spector of his competency to carry out 
inspections. 

Recognizing the importance of ensuring 
that competent workmen are in charge of 
hoist operations, the regulations prescribe 
the qualifications required for hoist oper- 
ators and hoist attendants, and for persons 
learning these jobs. A minimum age of 19 
years is established in each case. 

The operator of a construction hoist for 
workmen must have a certificate of qualifi- 
cation to operate a hoisting plant under the 
Operating Engineers Act, if the driving unit 
is not controlled within the car or at each 
landing. When a certificate of qualification 
is not required, the operator must have had 
sufficient experience in operating a construc- 
tion hoist to enable him to be aware of 
dangers, and to be competent to operate it 
safely. 

The hoist operator is solely responsible 
for the safe operation of a hoist that can- 
not be controlled directly from the hoist 
car or landings. He is forbidden to operate 
the hoist when a landing or car gate is 
open. He must ensure daily, before operat- 
ing the hoist, that it is safe to operate. 
He is also required to take measures to 
prevent the unauthorized use of the hoist 
if it is left unattended. 

The responsibilities of a hoist attendant, 
too, are set out. If a workmen's hoist can- 
not be controlled from every landing and 
from the car, there must be an attendant 
in the car when it is carrying workmen. 
An attendant must also be stationed at a 
landing while materials are being loaded 
or unloaded there. 



The attendant is responsible for the safety 
of movement of persons and materials to 
or from a hoist car at a landing. In addition, 
he must signal the hoist operator when a 
car may be safely moved, and ensure that 
all gates or doors are closed. He is for- 
bidden to operate an overloaded hoist unless 
it is being tested. 

General Specifications and Safety Rules 

The provisions relating to drawings and 
specifications require certain general infor- 
mation to be submitted, in addition to the 
required specifications. In this respect, the 
drawings must provide the following details: 
name and address of the owner of the 
building or premises; the location where 
the hoist is to be installed or altered; name 
and address of the user of the hoist; name, 
address and qualifications of the person by 
whom the drawings were prepared; and 
the purpose and maximum capacity of the 
hoist. 

Not less than three days before work 
is begun, the person who proposes to make 
an installation or a major alteration of a 
construction hoist, is required to give the 
Chief Inspector written notification of the 
time when the work will be started. 

The user must display in the hoist, notices 
and markings stating its maximum capacity 
and other information as specified. Unless 
these are affixed, it is forbidden to use or 
operate the hoist. 

The regulations lay down certain general 
requirements concerning the conduct of 
persons in or about a construction hoist. In 
this regard, no person may so conduct 
himself as to impair the safe operation of 
the hoist or endanger the safety of persons 
or materials being transported. 

Another provision states that no person, 
except an inspector, a user or his mechanic 
who is making a test or repair, may remove, 
displace, interfere with, or damage any 
safety device in or about the hoist. If a 
safety device has been removed, displaced, 
interfered with or damaged, the hoist may 
not be operated except for inspection, test- 
ing or repair, until the device has been 
restored to good working order; the user, 
his mechanic, and the person inspecting, 
must ensure prior to the completion of this 
work, that no unauthorized person enters, 
uses or operates the hoist. 

Safety Provisions Governing Mechanical 
Details 

The regulations include a general safety 
provision requiring every construction hoist 
and its related equipment to be so designed, 
constructed and maintained as to ensure 
the safety of persons on or near it, and to 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



153 



prevent it from travelling beyond, or deviat- 
ing from, the safe limits of its fixed position 
or proper line of travel. 

As regards specific safety standards for 
materials hoists, workmen's hoists and asso- 
ciated equipment, the regulations state 
requirements in connection with the machine 
(and apparatus for providing mechanical 
power for the hoist) : its horsepower rating 
and the machine area; the hoist tower and 
overhead beams; the hoistway, hoist way 
gates and landing platforms; the hoist car; 
hoisting cables; signal system; and other 
matters. 

The provisions relating to the machine 
specify, among other requirements, that its 
lifting capacity must be adequate; brakes 
must be capable of stopping and holding 
the car when loaded to 150 per cent of 
capacity, and, if the hoist is electrically 
powered, the brakes must apply automatic- 
ally in case of power failure; anchorage must 
be secure; and gears and other hazardous 
components must be properly guarded. 

The machine area must be adequate in 
size, have a substantial top to protect the 
operator, and be properly enclosed, located 
and lighted. The horsepower rating of the 
machine must be legibly shown on the 
power unit. 

The hoist tower and main overhead beams 
must be of steel; and must safely support 
loads likely to be imposed upon them. 
The hoist tower must be on a safe, firm and 
level foundation, be plumb, and securely 
braced and guyed. 

Provisions are laid down with respect 
to the enclosure of hoistway s. A gate and 
landing platform must be provided at each 
entrance, according to specifications pre- 
scribed. 

The hoist car must be designed using a 
factor of safety of five; it must safely 
support at least 50 pounds per square foot 
of car floor area; and be equipped with a 
safety device to stop and hold it if the 
means of suspension fails. 

Electrical or mechanical means of signal- 
ling the hoist operator must be provided at 
each landing. The code of signals to be 
used for this purpose is incorporated in the 
regulations. 

Other requirements specify that the 
machine area, tower landings and pit must 
be kept free of building materials, debris, 
and equipment not required for the hoist. 
Flammable fuel must be dispensed in safety 
containers and stored away from the hoist. 

The regulations applicable to workmen's 
hoists include nearly all of the provisions 
pertaining to materials hoists. In addition, 
however, special provisions, applying more 



stringent safety requirements than for mate- 
rials hoists, are set out with respect to: 
cables, car safety devices and gates, power 
unit, control of car movement, hoisting 
doors and gates, pit clearance, terminal 
and final limit switches, buffers and other 
matters. 

The provisions governing materials hoists, 
where applicable, also apply to concrete 
bucket hoists. The requirements concern- 
ing tower booms specify that the boom 
and its associated equipment must be of 
safe design and construction, and must be 
operated safely by a competent person. 

Several provisions relate to the manner 
in which construction hoists are to be 
used, operated and maintained. One of them 
imposes an obligation on the user to inspect 
and test the hoist before use, and also to 
do this periodically. Every landing gate 
must be kept closed unless the car is being 
loaded or unloaded. A workman may not be 
transported on a workmen's hoist while 
material other than hand tools or small 
objects is being transported on the hoist. 

Ontario Workmen's Compensation Act 

New regulations under the Ontario Work- 
men's Compensation Act, amending the 
schedule of industries subject to the collec- 
tive liability provisions of the Act, were 
gazetted as O. Reg. 328/62 on December 
22, and went into force on January 1. 

New industries added to the schedule 
included: auto upholstering; diving; the 
installation or erection of reinforcing steel; 
the business of supplying labour (clerical 
employees and other types of labour); and 
building caretaking and janitorial service. 

Another new provision states that when 
a firm is created for the purpose of carry- 
ing out a service, including clerical, account- 
ing, engineering or management services 
that would normally be an integral part of 
an industry or business subject to the Act, 
the service firm will now be classified and 
rated the same as the business for which 
the service is performed. If more than one 
rate of assessment is involved, the payroll 
of the service firm will be apportioned pro 
rata at the different appropriate rates. 

Saskatchewan Hours of Work Act 

The orders under the Saskatchewan Hours 
of Work Act, exempting offices and shops 
in the smaller centres from the provision 
requiring the payment of overtime after 8 
hours in a day and 44 hours in a week, 
were revised to reduce the regular work 
week to 44 hours in 17 additional towns. 



154 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



The new order for office workers (O.C. 
2031/62), permits office workers in centres 
outside the cities and 72 listed towns and 
villages and a five-mile radius of them, to 
work up to 48 hours in a week at straight- 
time rates. As a result of changes in the 
list, workers in the 17 places not previously 
listed must now be paid overtime after 44 
hours in a week instead of after 48 hours. 

A similar change was made in the new 
exemption order for shops (2032/62). As 
before, the 8-hour-day, 44-hour-week stand- 
ard applies only to shops in cities v/ith a 
population of over 10,000 and within a five- 
mile radius of them. 

In the smaller cities and in 72 listed 
towns and villages (17 more than formerly), 
employees in shops may work up to 11 
hours on any one day in the week at 
straight-time rates, but must be paid over- 
time for time worked in excess of 8 hours 
on any other day and for all hours in 
excess of 44 in the week. Where the total 



of the daily excesses and the weekly excess 
differ, the overtime rate is to be paid in 
respect of the greater excess. 

Shop employees in places other than the 
small cities and 72 listed towns and villages, 
may work up to 48 hours in a week at 
straight-time rates. 

Oil truckers other than those engaged 
in long-distance trucking are again excluded 
from the exemption order for shop em- 
ployees. An earlier exemption order (1207/ 
55) provides that, in the case of such 
employees, overtime in excess of 44 hours 
in the busy season may be offset in the 
slack season. 

As before, both new orders provide that 
in any week in which a public holiday 
occurs, the weekly standard for overtime 
purposes is to be reduced by eight hours, 
and no account is to be taken of any time 
that an employee may have been required 
to work or be at the disposal of his em- 
ployer on the holiday. 



Facing Facts in Labour Relations 

(Continued from page 128) 

There had been particular disputes in 
which conciliation or mediation had failed, 
and governments, representing the commun- 
ity, had imposed compulsory arbitration in 
the interest of the public. Such intervention 
had been rare, he said, and "in a free 
society the power to force compulsory settle- 
ment must be used with great discretion." 

Nevertheless, we have to accept the principle 
that where the interests of the parties conflict 
with the over-all interests of the community, it 
is the interests of the community which should 
prevail. And this principle must govern in any 
area where the welfare or the safety of the 
community may be injuriously affected by the 
conduct of organized interests, be they doctors 
or hod-carriers. 

It had been suggested from time to time 
that our society has reached a stage of 
development in which strikes and lockouts 
have become obsolete. "I am afraid that 
this is an example of both over-simplifica- 
tion and over-optimism," Mr. Goldenberg 
said. 

There was no doubt that the use of the 
strike weapon would continue to be affected 
by social and economic changes. Change in 
our society has reduced some of the causes 
of tension in industrial relations but "we 
cannot conclude that it has eliminated them; 
in fact, change has created new tensions." 

Because of increasing automation and 
other technological changes in industry, men 
trained in particular skills, which they 



expected to use their whole working life, 
may find, at an age when they cannot be 
retrained or obtain new employment, that 
their skills are no longer required. "We 
find here the raw material of conflict." 

Call for Co-operation 

The human consequences of economic and 
technological changes are now, therefore, 
matters of major concern to governments 
and in labour-management relations. "It is 
clear that these problems call at the outset 
for close co-operation between management 
and labour." 

I am confident that in this day and age no 
responsible management will take steps vitally 
affecting its working force before consulting 
its representatives. Without responsibility on one 
side, there will not be responsibility on the 
other! I suggest that it would promote respon- 
sibility if, instead of meeting only as opponents 
in collective bargaining negotiations or on 
grievances, the representatives of management 
and unions would meet more regularly to dis- 
cuss matters of mutual concern affecting the 
industry. 

Such discussions would give recognition to 
the fact that their mutual interests extend 
beyond the issues of wages, hours and working 
conditions ... In this way they could learn 
to understand each other and their respective 
problems, which is essential if mutual con- 
fidence is to replace mutual suspicion. This 
would be a mark of responsibility — and the 
public has a right to demand responsibility 
from both sides. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY J963 



155 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND 
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Number of claimants at end of November higher by 53 per cent than that at end 
of October, 3 per cent lower than at end of November 1961, statistics* show 



Claimants for unemployment insurance 
benefit numbered 374,200 on November 30. 
This figure was 53 per cent higher than the 
total of 244,100 at the end of October, 
but about 3 per cent less than the 386,000 
reported on November 30, 1961. 

Male claimants increased by 110,000 
during November, and female claimants by 
about 20,000. The preponderence of males 
is accounted for mainly by the usual reduc- 
tion in outside work at this time of the 
year. The reduction in numbers from the 
previous year occurred among males only. 

Some 12,000 of the November claimants 
were classified under seasonal benefit; in 
November 1961 some 15,000 were so 
classified. 

Initial and Renewal Claims 

Initial and renewal claims filed in 
November numbered 243,600, nearly 95,000 
more than in October but 9,000 fewer than 
in November 1961. 

Of the 175,500 initial claims filed during 
November, some 161,000, or 90 per cent, 
were separations from employment during 
the month. The remaining 15,000 claims 
were made by claimants who had exhausted 
benefit and were seeking re-establishment 
of credits. 

Beneficiaries and Benefit Payments 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries in November was estimated at 
189,000, compared with 152,900 in October 
and 209,800 in November 1961. 

Payments during the month amounted to 
$18,900,000, compared with $15,800,000 
in October and $20,900,000 in November 
1961. 

The average weekly payment was $23.85 
in November, $23.42 in October and $23.76 
in November 1961. 



In a comparison of current unemployment 
insurance statistics with those for a previous 
period, consideration should be given to 
relevant factors other than numbers, such as 
the opening and closing of seasonal indus- 
tries, increase in area population, influence 
of weather conditions, and the general em- 
ployment situation. 

Claimants should not be interpreted either 
as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total 
job applicants." 

A claimant's unemployment register is 
placed in the "live file" at the local office 
as soon as the claim is made. As a result, 
the count of claimants at any given time 
inevitably includes some whose claims are 
in process. 



Insurance Registrations 

Reports for November showed that insur- 
ance books or contribution cards had been 
issued to 4,855,176 employees who had 
made contributions to the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund at one time or another 
since April 1. 

At November 30, registered employers 
numbered 338,837, an increase of 1,593 
since October 31. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During November, 9,939 investigations 
were conducted by enforcement officers 
across Canada. Of these, 6,413 were spot 
checks of postal and counter claims to verify 
the fulfilment of statutory conditions, and 
278 were miscellaneous investigations. The 
remaining 3,248 were investigations in con- 
nection with claimants suspected of making 
false statements to obtain benefits. 

Prosecutions were begun in 285 cases, 
52 against employers and 233 against 
claimants.* 

Punitive disqualifications as a result of 
false statements or misrepresentations by 
claimants numbered 1,626.* 



* See Tables E-l to E-4, p. 183. 



* These do not necessarily relate to the investi- 
gations conducted during this period. 



156 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received by the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund in November totalled $29,- 
588,260.44, compared with $30,065,935.05 
in October and $29,684,645.04 in November 
1961. 



Benefits paid in November totalled $18,- 
933,672.63, compared with $15,753,718.61 
in October and $20,938,332.74 in Novem- 
ber 1961. 

The balance in the Fund on November 
30 was $100,583,175.19; on October 31 it 
was $89,928,587.38 and on November 31, 
1961 it was $163,483,393.73. 



Monthly Report on Operations of 

the National Employment Service 

Vacancies notified by employers to na- indicating a seasonal reduction in local 

tional employment offices continued to shortages of labour. 

decline seasonally in December, although Only the two largest regions continued 

the total was about the same as in Decern- to record year-to-year increases in place- 

ber 1961. Some 98,700 vacancies were me nts. Percentage changes over December 

notified in December, compared with 130,- a yea r ago, by regions, were as follows: 
700 in the preceding month and 99,400 a Atlantic —22 5 

vear earlier. Vacancies for women, at n h _i_ 7 7 

40,500, were 11.1 per cent higher than a Quebec + /./ 

year earlier but vacancies for men declined Ontario +12.3 

by 7.4 per cent to a total of 58,200. Prairie -11.5 

In December 1962, some 97,000 place- Pacific - 4.5 
ments were made, an increase of 0.7 per Cumulative totals for the calendar year 
cent over the same month last year, the 1962 s how an outstanding record in volume 
smallest year-to-year rate of increase to of employment activity, despite some reduc- 
be recorded since early 1961. Placements of t i ons toward the end of the year. Em- 
men decreased from December 1961 by p i oy ers notified NES offices of some 1,555,- 
6.0 per cent to 57,500, although placements 00 vacancies, and 1,336,000 of these 
of women increased by 12.3 per cent. vacancies resulted in placements. Some 

Some 2,600 of the placements effected in 73,000, or 5.5 per cent of these placements 

December involved the movement of work- required the movement of workers between 

ers from one local office area to another. local office areas. Each of these totals 

Although slightly higher than that a year represents a postwar record in employment 

earlier, this total of transfers was sub- activity, indicating a highly active labour 

stantially smaller than that in November, market during most of the year. 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB 2078, November 28, 1962 

( Translation ) 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant filed an initial application for benefit 
on December 27, 1961, and registered for 
employment as a mechanical shovel opera- 
tor. He stated that he had last worked as 
a tractor operator from April 17 to Decem- 
ber 21, 1961. The claim was allowed as of 
December 17, 1961. 

On March 28, 1962, he reported to the 
local office that he had been working as a 
driver of a school bus. He worked about 
li hours in the morning and H hours in 
the evening. He stated that the job was 
only temporary, because if he found regular 
work, "I would leave this job." 



At the same time he told the local office 
that his doctor had told him that "it would 
be advisable for me to undergo a surgical 
operation." When he went to hospital he 
would have to give up his bus driver's job 
for about two weeks, he said. 

As the claimant met the conditions of 
Regulation 155 (4) since he was not work- 
ing the full working week, the insurance 
officer decided that he was unemployed 
within the meaning of sections 54 (1) and 
57 (1) of the Act. The claimant's earnings 
were not deducted from his benefit since 
they were less than the $17 a week to 
which he was entitled under section 56 of 
the Act. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



157 



The claimant wrote to the local office 
that he had, on the morning of April 2, 
1962, completed his usual trips at the 
opening of the school and that he would 
go into hospital at 4 o'clock in the afternoon 
to undergo surgery. The doctor who exam- 
ined the claimant certified that the operation 
was scheduled for April 9 and that he 
would be incapable of resuming his employ- 
ment before the end of the month. 

On April 16, the insurance officer dis- 
qualified the claimant from receiving benefit 
as from April 2 because he had lost his 
employment by reason of illness (sections 
54 (2) (a) and 66 of the Act). 

On May 1 the claimant appealed to the 
board of referees. In his appeal he pointed 
out that he had been receiving unemploy- 
ment insurance since January 3, had to 
have an operation on April 2, and that his 
benefit was suspended "because I was earn- 
ing $15 a week as a school bus driver," 
although "they told me that I was entitled 
to earn this amount over and above my 
unemployment insurance . . ." 

The board of referees heard the appeal 
on July 4. The claimant was not present 
nor represented at the hearing. 

The unanimous decision of the board 
reads, in part: 

... In the board's opinion, the record shows 
that the claimant took advantage of his period 
of unemployment to undergo treatment and 
care and this did not come, under the circum- 
stances, within the purview of section 66, 
since he was unemployed, was already receiv- 
ing benefit and could have remained idle instead 
of working three hours each day in employ- 
ment other than in his usual occupation. In 
addition the illness from which he was suffering 
and which did not hinder him from working 
is a chronic illness that is often met with in 
the majority of men in his occupation. 

Consequently, the board of referees, com- 
posed of its chairman, the employers' represen- 
tative and the employees' representative, unani- 
mously allow the claimant's appeal and reject 
the insurance officer's decision. 

On August 20 the insurance officer 
appealed to the Umpire. In his reasons for 
appeal he said, among other things: 

It is granted that the claimant fulfilled the 
first part of section 66 of the Act, that is that 
he had become entitled to receive benefit at the 
time when he became unable to work due to 
illness. In addition, it is granted that his part- 
time work in no way affected his right to 
receive benefit. However, he nevertheless seems 
to be disqualified from receiving benefit by 
reason of the last part of section 66 of the 
Act since he, in fact, lost his job or ceased 
to work because of illness. 

Considerations and Conclusions: Section 
66 of the Act is an exceptional disposition; 
it must, consequently, be strictly interpreted. 
Consequently, the word "to work" in the 
expression "ceased to work" must, in the 
absence of any explicit clause to restrict or 
otherwise modify it, be understood in its 



ordinary sense of to devote oneself to a 
remunerative occupation, whatever be the 
nature and duration of that occupation. 

According to the evidence, the claimant 
worked in the ordinary sense of the word 
on the morning of April 2, 1962, and if 
he did not do so in the afternoon of the 
same day, it is solely by reason of illness. 
Therefore, the insurance officer was right 
in disqualifying the claimant from receiving 
benefit under section 54 (2) (a) of the 
Act. 

I consequently decide to allow the insur- 
ance officer's appeal. 

Decision CUB 2085, November 30, 1962 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, a married woman, filed an initial 
application for benefit on March 16, 1962. 
She stated in the application that she had 
worked as a marker for a laundry and 
dry cleaning establishment at $78 a week 
from June 1957 to March 7, 1962. The 
claim was allowed at the rate of a person 
without dependant. 

On May 24 she applied for the depend- 
ency rate of benefit in respect of her 
nine -year-old daughter. In answer to ques- 
tions on the application form she said she 
had to support this dependant because her 
husband was out of work and had ex- 
hausted his unemployment benefits, that 
she expected "to support her as long as I 
am able to," and that she had done so 
"all the time when I was working." She 
said also that no one else was contributing 
to the dependant's support. 

In answer to questions by the NES local 
office in a letter dated May 25, she said 
her husband had claimed her daughter for 
income tax purposes for 1961, that he had 
claimed her as his dependant when he was 
on unemployment insurance benefit, and 
that he ceased to collect his benefit on May 
18, 1962. 

On May 29, 1962, the insurance officer 
notified the claimant that, on the informa- 
tion which had been presented, she was 
not entitled to the dependency rate of 
benefit, on the ground that she had failed 
to prove that she was wholly or mainly 
maintaining the person for whom she 
claimed the dependency rate (section 47 (3) 
of the Act and Regulation 168). 

The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees on June 5, 1962, and said: 

... I feel that I should be able to claim 
my daughter as a dependant as she is wholly 
maintained by me. As I stated in the previous 
form which I filled in that I was going to keep 
my daughter as long as I could and since my 
husband is no longer receiving his benefits, 
and has not been receiving any since the 
middle of May, I feel that I should definitely 
be able to claim my daughter as a dependant. 



158 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



When my husband obtains a steady position 
and [is] able to support our daughter, then 
I will notify you and have her as his depend- 
ant . . . 

In a letter received with her appeal, 
she stated: "My reason for appeal is 
because my husband is not working and 
his unemployment insurance has run out, 
and he is not drawing any other income, 
and I am not able to keep her on my 
$21.00 per week, and that is the reason I am 
claiming her . . ." 

The board of referees heard the case on 
June 27. The claimant was accompanied 
at the hearing by the secretary-treasurer 
of the local of the Laundry, Dry Cleaning 
& Dye House Workers' International Union 
of which she was a member. 

The unanimous decision of the board 
reads: 

Reviewing the evidence in the submission and 
the jurisprudence in CUB 1048, which is rele- 
vant to this case and has a direct application 
to the merits of this appeal, and which has 
been referred to the Board for guidance, we 
can do no other than agree with the decision 
of the insurance officer. The Board disallows 
the appeal and the dependency rate is not 
approved as stated in the insurance officer's 
reasons. 

On August 2 the union appealed to 
the Umpire, stating that at the time the 
claimant was laid off her husband was 
unemployed and had used up his insurance 
benefits by May 18. While he was entitled 
to benefits he had claimed the daughter as 
a dependant; he had also claimed her as 
a dependant for 1961 income tax purposes. 

From May 18, however, the union said, 
the family's only income was the $21 a 
week that the claimant was receiving in 
unemployment benefits. She found it im- 
possible to support the family on this 
amount and, therefore, wished to claim her 
daughter as a dependant. 

The union then stated: 

Section 47 (3) states that for the purpose of 
this Section 

(a) Person with a dependant is 

(II) a married woman who has a hus- 
band dependent on her; 
(III) a person who maintains solely or 
mainly one or more children under 
the age of 16 years. 

(b) A child means a child of the insured 
person; 

(c) A person who does not reside in Canada 
is not a dependant, except as prescribed 
by the regulations made by the Com- 
mission. 

The submission of [the claimant] is therefore 
that she is entitled to claim her child as a 
dependant since she is a person, who, accord- 
ing to subsection (III), maintains wholly or 
mainly one child under the age of 16 years 
and that child does not reside outside of 
Canada. 



It is therefore submitted that as the words 
of this subsection are clear and unequivocal, as 
of May 18, 1962, [the claimant] was maintain- 
ing wholly a child under the age of 16 years. 
It is submitted further that the only test is 
whether or not the person claiming was main- 
taining wholly or mainly a dependant at the 
time the unemployment insurance benefit is 
claimed, and not whether that person has 
claimed for a dependant prior to that time. The 
test applied by the Court of Referees appears 
to have been that there has to be continuity 
of a relationship of dependency so as to ensure 
the genuineness of such a relationship. We sub- 
mit that this is an incorrect principle for deter- 
mining the issue of dependency. The Act does 
not qualify dependency in any way and it 
cannot be implied from the clear words of the 
Statute. There is no condition that the depen- 
dency need exist prior to the claim. 

For this principle, may we refer you to the 
quotation of Lord Atkinson, cited in the case 
of Victoria v. Bishop of Vancouver Island, 
1921, 3 WWR. 214: 

"In the construction of statutes their words 
must be interpreted in their ordinary gram- 
matical sense unless there be something in the 
context or in the object of the statute in which 
they occur, or in the circumstances with refer- 
ence to which they are used in a special sense, 
different from their ordinary grammatical sense." 

The above canon of construction has been 
followed again and again and has been called 
the Golden Rule for the interpretation of 
Statutes (per Perdue, J. A.). The "ordinary 
grammatical sense" of S 47 (3) (III) does not 
allow for the addition of the words "and who 
has maintained solely or mainly one or more 
children prior to the making of the claim for 
benefits." 

What has happened prior to the claim is 
entirely irrelevant. The only question for the 
Board of Referees to concern themselves with 
is the question of whether at the time of the 
claim, the person claiming for the dependant 
is the person maintaining wholly or mainly a 
child: that is to say, the Board need only ask 
"who at the time of the claim is the actual 
breadwinner of the family?" 

Indeed, to argue that the person claiming 
for a dependant must be the person who has 
always claimed for the dependant is to add 
to the statute not only a qualification unjustified 
in law, but also one inconsistent with the facts 
of married life. To argue that continuity is 
necessary in order to claim dependency rates 
is to propound the fallacy "once a breadwinner, 
always a breadwinner." This is clearly an 
unrealistic view of married life. In these days 
of heavy unemployment, it is sometimes the 
husband who is the chief breadwinner and 
sometimes it is the wife . . . When the wife 
is the sole provider for the family, then she is 
entitled to claim for her dependants also, 
and surely this must have been the real inten- 
tion behind the legislation. 

We therefore ask you to reject the decision 
of the Board of Referees and allow [the claim- 
ant's] appeal . . . 

Considerations and Conclusions: The only 
question before me for decision in the 
present case is whether or not the claimant 
has shown that, as from Sunday, May 20, 

( Continued on page 16S) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



159 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN FEDERAL 
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS 



Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during December 
Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During December the Department of Labour prepared 7 1 wage schedules for inclusion 
in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government and its 
Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, remodelling, 
repair or demolition. In the same period, a total of 85 contracts in these categories was 
awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. 

In addition, 57 contracts not listed in this report and which contained the General 
Fair Wages Clause were awarded by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Defence 
Construction (1951) Ltd and the Departments of Defence Production, Mines and Technical 
Surveys, Northern Affairs and National Resources, Post Office, Public Works and 
Transport. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the 
contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under the heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in December for the manufacture of supplies and equipment were 
as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Defence Construction (1951) Ltd 3 % 15,000.00 

Defence Production 88 1,016,766.00 

Post Office 2 18,580.00 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1 5,379.00 



The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour 
legislation of the federal Government has 
the purpose of insuring that all Government 
contracts for works of construction and for 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment 
contain provisions to secure the payment of 
wages generally accepted as fair and reason- 
able in each trade or classification employed 
in the district where the work is being per- 
formed. 

The practice of Government departments 
and those Crown corporations to which the 
legislation applies, before entering into con- 
tracts for any work of construction, re- 
modelling, repair or demolition, is to obtain 
wage schedules from the Department of 
Labour showing the applicable wage rate 
for each classification of workmen deemed 
to be required in the execution of the work. 



These wage schedules are thereupon in- 
cluded with other relevant labour condi- 
tions as terms of such contracts to be 
observed by the contractors. 

Wage schedules are not included in con- 
tracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
equipment because it is not possible to 
determine in advance the classifications to 
be employed in the execution of a contract. 
A statement of the labour conditions which 
must be observed in every such contract 
is however, included therein and is of the 
same nature and effect as those which apply 
in works of construction. 

Copies of the federal Government's Fair 
Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 
may be had upon request to the Industrial 
Relations Branch of the Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 



160 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate, but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) the working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, or if 
there be no such custom, then fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during December 

During December the sum of $978.90 was collected from one contractor for wage 
arrears due his employees as a result of his failure to apply the wage rates and other 
conditions of employment required by the schedule of labour conditions forming part 
of his contract. This amount is for distribution to the 39 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded during December 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Chalk River Ont: Rusco Ottawa Ltd, installation of windows, 2nd north extension, 
Metallurgy Bldg 465. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

New Glasgow N S: Maritime Mechanical Construction, rewiring of 24 houses 
(Project 2/48). Pinawa Man: Louis Ducharme & Associates Ltd, construction of hostel 
(Job 29); Imperial Construction Co Ltd, construction of 34 row housing units (Job 31). 
Winnipeg Man: Imperial Construction Co Ltd, construction of 165 housing units (FP 
1/61). 

In addition, this Corporation awarded 15 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Department of Citizenship and Immigration 

Edmonton Indian Agency Aha: Thomas Koziak, installation of plumbing facilities, 
sewer & water services & structural alterations in 12 houses, Stony Plain Reserve. Kamloops 
Indian Agency B C: McKinnon Plumbing & Heating Ltd, replacement of hot water boiler 
& storage tank, Kamloops IRS. 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Summerside P E I: Eastern Woodworkers Ltd, construction of addition to armament 
bldg, RCAF Station. Cornwallis N S: Joseph Downey & Son, interior painting of 107 
PMQs, HMCS Cornwallis; Chas Dargie & Son Ltd, installation of asbestos tile in Bldg 20, 
HMCS Cornwallis. Dartmouth N S: Joseph Downey & Son, interior painting of various 
apartments, Shannon Park Married Quarters. Chatham N B: Marrithew Construction 
Ltd, clearing & grubbing, RCAF Station; Melvin J Hayes, construction of roadwork, 
carpentry, etc, for liquid gaseous oxygen storage bldg, RCAF Station. La Salle Que: Morin 
& Plante Co Ltd, re-roofing of Bldg 6, HMCS Hochelaga. St Jean Que: Lloyd Construction 
Ltd, extension to central heating plant, RCAF Station; Dickson-Larkey Ltd, installation of 
underground steam distribution system, RCAF Station. Valcartier Que: St Lawrence 
Construction Ltd, extension to waterworks system, CARDE. Shirley Bay Ont: Cribb Con- 
struction Co Ltd, modification to electrical standby power distribution system, DRB. 
Frobisher Bay N W T: Whelpton Electric Ltd, supply & erection of antennae masts at 
RCN Receiving Site. 

Building and Maintenance 

Kitchener Ont: F W Hill & Co, alterations to existing bldg for Victoria St Armoury. 
In addition, Defence Construction (1951) Ltd awarded one contract containing the 
General Fair Wages Clause. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 161 



Department of Defence Production 

Dartmouth N S: A B C Construction Ltd, exterior repairs & installation of asbestos 
wall shingles, Bldg No 9, RCN Armament Depot. Shearwater N S: Webb Engineering Ltd, 
replacement of steam & return lines for Bldg No 21, RCN Air Station. Esquimalt B C: 
Futcher & Helgesen Ltd, erection of security fence, Munro Head; Steel-Bilt Contractors 
Ltd, supply & erection of prefabricated bldg at Pacific Naval Laboratory, HMC Dockyard. 

In addition, this Department awarded 16 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Department of Mines and Technical Surveys 

This Department awarded five contracts containing the General Fair Wages Clause. 

National Harbours Board 

Montreal Que: Walsh-Ri Vermont, construction of overflow to Montreal Aqueduct 
Canal, Section 1A, Champlain Bridge. 

Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources 

Enterprise & Rae N W T: Tim's Garage, construction of roads. Fort Providence 
N W T: Territorial Expeditors Ltd, construction of road. Fort Smith N W T: Fort Smith 
Construction, construction of fire hall. Yellowknife N W T: O I Johnson Construction 
Ltd, construction of liquor administration office. 

In addition, this Department awarded one contract containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Post Office Department 

This Department awarded one contract containing the General Fair Wages Clause. 

Department of Public Works 

Laurenceton Nfld: Gid Sacrey Ltd, wharf repairs. St John's Nfld: William Jacobs Ltd, 
harbour improvements (South Side Road). Summerside P E J: H J Phillips & Son, 
harbour improvements. Big Bras D'Or N S: MacDonald & MacKeigan, wharf repairs. 
Church Point N S: C J Thibodeau, construction of post office bldg. Halifax N S: The 
Foundation Co of Canada Ltd, repairs to Jetty 1, HMC Dockyard. Middle Point Cove 
N S: Naugle's Sand & Gravel Co Ltd, breakwater repairs. Ste Marie-sur-Mer N B: Comeau 
& Savoie Construction Ltd, wharf repairs. Bale Comeau Que: Manik Construction Co 
Ltd, wharf repairs. Hebertville Station Que: Jean Paul Larouche, construction of post office 
bldg. Luceville Que: Fernando Belanger, construction of post office bldg. Montreal Que: 
Prieur Entreprises Inc, installation of mechanical doors, postal terminal bldg, 715 
Windsor St. Mont Rolland Que: Lionel Constantineau, construction of post office bldg. 
Pont Rouge Que: Les Entreprises Jean R Denoncourt Enrg, construction of post office 
bldg. St Agapit Que: Les Entreprises Jean R Denoncourt Enrg, construction of post office 
bldg. Ste Croix Que: Henri Garneau, construction of post office bldg. St Jean de Dieu Que: 
Paul Malenfant, construction of post office bldg. Arnprior Ont: A Oelsner & Son, interior 
& exterior painting, Civil Defence College; Stanley Sulphur Construction Co Ltd, altera- 
tions to five bldgs & hangar No 2, Civil Defence College. Ottawa Ont: Angus Robertson 
Ltd, construction of new administration bldg, National Research Council, Montreal Road. 
between Ottawa Ont and Hull Que: Dufresne Engineering Co Ltd, construction of 
MacDonald-Cartier Bridge. Tottenham Ont: Winson Construction Ltd, construction of 
post office bldg. Winnipeg Man: Safeway Electric Co Ltd, additions & alterations to 
lighting, 3rd & 4th floors, general post office bldg. Shellbrook Sask: W C Wells Con- 
struction Co Ltd, construction of federal bldg. Andrew Alta: Briden Construction Ltd, 
construction of post office bldg. Evansburg Alta: McLeod Mercantile Ltd, construction 
of post office bldg. Brentwood Bay B C: E J Hunter & Sons, construction of post office bldg. 
Chemainus B C: Harbour Pile Driving, approach renewal. Kaslo B C: Williscroft Con- 
struction Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Fort Mann B C: Greenlees Piledriving Co 
Ltd, float renewal. Prince Rupert (Fairview Bay) B C: Universal Electric (Division of 
Univex Electrical Construction & Engineering Ltd), electrical installation, Ferry Terminal. 
Shoal Harbour B C: Victoria Pile Driving Co Ltd, construction of fishermen's harbour. 

162 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



Snug Cove B C: Fraser River Pile Driving Co Ltd, float renewal. Sourdough Bay B C: 
Northwest Construction Ltd, construction of storage bldg for Department of Fisheries. 
Ucluelet B C: Tom Gibson Contracting, approach & float renewal. Winfield B C: Lang 
Construction Ltd, construction of post office bldg. 

In addition, this Department awarded 17 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

Department of Transport 

Channel Head Nfld: J J Hussey Ltd, construction of dwelling & demolition of existing 
dwelling. St John's (Torbay) Nfld: Davis Construction Ltd, installation of heating system 
for elevated water tank. Halifax N S: Steen Mechanical Contractors Ltd, plumbing, 
heating, ventilation, roof deck covering & related work, Air Terminal Bldg, International 
Airport. Sydney N S: Tidewater Construction Co Ltd, widening taxiway No 3 & sand 
seal portions of runways 07-25. Dorval Que: The Foundation Co of Canada Ltd, 
miscellaneous general works in main Air Terminal Bldg & air conditioning equipment 
for fingers, tunnels & aeroquay & related works, Montreal International Airport; Canadian 
Pittsburg Industries Ltd, permanently sealing of windows, strengthening of frames & 
replacement of weather stripping, Air Terminal Bldg, Montreal International Airport. 
Quebec Que: Adrien Hebert Ltee, revision to baggage handling facilities, Air Terminal 
Bldg. St Mary's Island Que: Landry Construction Inc, construction of dwelling & power 
house & demolition of existing dwelling, near Amherstburg Ont: Ranta Enterprises 
(Amherstburg) Ltd, construction of two landings for Pier Lights "F" & "G", Detroit 
River. Caribou Island Ont: George Stone & Sons Ltd, construction of dwelling & demolition 
of existing dwelling. Michipicoten Island Ont: George Stone & Sons Ltd, construction of 
bungalow at East End. near Newboro Ont: Rothwell-Perrin Lumber Ltd, construction of 
bungalow for lockmaster, Narrows Lockstation, Rideau Canal. Sarnia Ont: Docherty & 
Whelpton Construction Co, modification of remote transmitter bldg. Uplands Ont: T P 
Crawford Ltd, installation of air conditioning on second & third floors, Air Terminal 
Bldg, Ottawa Airport. Windsor Ont: Whelpton Electric Ltd, construction of garage, firehall 
& related work. Penticton B C: Gilmour Construction & Engineering Co Ltd, construction 
of duct & pullpit system & related work. Pitt Meadows B C: Hanssen Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of garage, airport services bldg & related work. Tofino B C: Tom Gibson 
Contracting, replacing bridge on Airport road. White Rock B C: Brockbank & Hemingway 
Ltd, construction of non-directional beacon bldg & related work. Yellowknife N W T: 
Solar Construction Co Ltd, construction of water & sewer services for terminal bldg at 
Airport. 

In addition, this Department awarded one contract containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 



Decisions of the Umpire 

(Continued from page 159) 

1962, she, and not her husband, was the 
person who was maintaining wholly or 
mainly their nine-year-old daughter. 

In CUB 1260, which is a more recent 
decision than CUB 1048, the Umpire ruled 
that "the rate of benefit applicable to the 
dependency or single status is subject to 
fluctuation according to the factors present 
at any given time." 

The factors present at the time the 
claimant applied for the dependency rate of 



benefit in the instant case can be summed 
up as follows: (a) the claimant was the 
breadwinner of the family, and (b) her 
husband was in receipt of no income what- 
soever. 

In view of the foregoing, I consider that 
the claimant has shown that she was entitled 
to the dependency rate of benefit as from 
May 20, 1962. 

I consequently decide to allow the union's 
appeal. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



163 



PRICES AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Consumer Price Index, January 1963 

The consumer price index (1949=100) 
edged up 0.1 per cent, from 131.9 to 132.0, 
between December and January.* Increases 
in the food, housing and recreation and 
reading indexes outweighed decreases in the 
clothing and transportation indexes. The 
health and personal care, and tobacco and 
alcohol indexes were unchanged. 

The consumer price index for January 
1962 was 129.7. 

The food index rose 0.9 per cent, from 
127.8 to 129.0, as a result of price increases 
on a wide range of items, including bread, 
sugar, citrus fruits, bananas, frozen orange 
juice and imported fresh vegetables. Beef 
and pork prices continued to decline for the 
third successive month, after their October 
1962 peaks. Lower prices were reported also 
for eggs, turkey and canned vegetables. 

The housing index increased 0.1 per cent, 
from 135.7 to 135.9. The shelter component 
rose 0.2 per cent but the household opera- 
tion index was unchanged. In shelter, rents 
were unchanged but the home-ownership 
index increased. In household operation, 
lower prices for appliances, floor coverings 
and textiles balanced price increases for 
furniture, utensils and equipment, and 
household supplies. 

The clothing index declined 0.9 per cent, 
from 115.8 to 114.7, reflecting widespread 
January sales for all clothing groups, partic- 
ularly men's overcoats and suits, women's 
fur and cloth coats and children's winter 
coats. 

The transportation index declined 0.3 per 
cent, from 140.2 to 139.8, as a result of 
further price decreases for gasoline in 
eastern Canada and somewhat lower prices 
for new passenger cars. The local trans- 
portation index was up slightly as a result 
of bus fare increases in one city. 

The recreation and reading index in- 
creased 0.3 per cent, from 148.2 to 148.6. 
Higher prices for television sets and phono- 
graph records moved the recreation com- 
ponent and a price increase for newspapers 
in one city caused a fractional rise in the 
reading component. 

The health and personal care, and 
tobacco and alcohol indexes were unchanged 
at 159.8 and 117.8 respectively. 

* See Table F-l, p. 186. 



City Consumer Price Indexes, December 1962 

Consumer price indexes (1949=100) 
between November and December rose in 
three cities, fell in two cities, and were 
unchanged in the other five.* Increases 
were 0.2 per cent in Montreal and Saskatoon- 
Regina, and 0.4 per cent in Saint John; 
decreases were 0.1 per cent in Halifax and 
0.2 per cent in Toronto. 

Food indexes fell in. seven cities, de- 
creases ranging from 0.1 per cent in St. 
John's, Ottawa and Vancouver to 1.0 per 
cent in Halifax. Increases in the food 
indexes were 0.2 per cent in Saint John and 
Winnipeg and 1.1 per cent in Montreal. 

Six cities had higher housing indexes; 
the other four were unchanged. Clothing 
indexes were higher in all cities except 
two, in which they were lower. Transporta- 
tion indexes rose in five cities, fell in three, 
and remained unchanged in two. The only 
change in the health and personal care 
indexes was a slight decline in the Winnipeg 
index. In the recreation and reading group, 
four indexes were higher, four lower, and 
two unchanged. There were no changes in 
the city indexes for tobacco and alcohol. 

Percentage changes in the regional in- 
dexes between November and December 
were: Saint John +0.4, Montreal +0.2, 
Saskatoon-Regina +0.2, Toronto —0.2, 
Halifax —0.1. The remaining five regional 
indexes were unchanged. 

Point changes in regional consumer price 
indexes were: Saint John +0.5 to 131.9; 
Montreal +0.3 to 132.3; Saskatoon-Regina 
+ 0.3 to 128.3; Toronto —0.2 to 133.0; 
Halifax —0.1 to 130.8. St. John's, Ottawa, 
Winnipeg, Edmonton-Calgary and Van- 
couver remained unchanged at 118.lt, 
132.7, 130.1, 127.4 and 130.6 respectively. 

Wholesale Price Index, December 1962 

The general wholesale index (1935-39= 
100) stood at 242.4 in December, practically 
unchanged from the November index of 
242.3 but 2.5 per cent higher than the 
December 1961 index of 236.5. 

A moderate advance in one major group 
index and slight increases in two others 
narrowly outweighed downward movements 



* See Table F-2, p. 186. 
t On base June 1951=100. 



164 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



of similar magnitude in four major group 
indexes. The remaining one — non-metallic 
minerals products — was unchanged. 

The vegetable products group index rose 
1.4 per cent to 216.3 from 213.3. Increases 
of 0.1 per cent or less were recorded for 
textile products, to 244.3 from 244.1, and 
chemical products, to 190.2 from 190.1. 

The animal products group index moved 
down 1.3 per cent to 265.4 from 268.8. 
Decreases in three major group indexes 
were confined to 0.1 per cent or less: wood 
products to 318.7 from 319.1, iron products 
to 254.8 from 255.0, and non-ferrous metals 
products to 194.6 from 194.7. 

The non-metallic mineral products index 
was unchanged at 189.5. 

The residential building material price 
index (1935-39=100) was 296.2 in Decem- 
ber, unchanged from the November index. 
On the base 1949=100 the index was 129.9. 

The non-residential building material price 
index (1949=100) edged up to 132.9 from 
132.4. 



The index of Canadian farm product 

prices (1935-39=100) eased down 0.6 per 
cent, in the three week period ended Decem- 
ber 21, from 230.9 to 229.6. The animal 
products index declined 1.8 per cent but 
the field products index moved up 1.6 per 
cent. 

U.S. Consumer Price Index, December 1962 

The United States consumer price index 
(1957-59=100) declined slightly between 
mid-November and mid-December, drop- 
ping from 106.0 to 105.8. The decline was 
attributed to lower food prices. 

British Index of Retail Prices, November 1962 

The British index of retail prices (Jan. 16, 
1962=100) rose from 101.4 to 101.8 be- 
tween mid-October and mid-November 
1962. On the base Jan. 17, 1956=100 it 
rose from 119.1 to 119.6. 

The food index rose about 0.5 per cent 
and the fuel and light index nearly 4.5 per 
cent. But the transportation and vehicles 
index dropped nearly 2 per cent. 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not 
for sale by the Department of Labour. 
Persons wishing to purchase them should 
communicate with the publishers. Publica- 
tions listed may be borrowed by making 
application to the Librarian, Department 
of , Labour, Ottawa. Students must apply 
through the library of their institution. 
Applications for loans should give the num- 
ber (numeral) of the publication desired 
and the month in which it was listed in 
the Labour Gazette. 

List No. 172 

Accidents 

1. International Labour Office. Bene- 
fits in the Case of Industrial Accidents and 
Occupational Diseases. Seventh item on the 
agenda. Geneva, 1962. Pp. 172. At head of 
title: Report 7(1). International Labour 
Conference. 47th session, Geneva, 1963. 

Part 1 provides background material, de- 
scribes the relevant law and practice in some 
member states, and includes a questionnaire 
to be completed and returned by member 
countries. 

2. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Fabri- 
cation of Structural Steel and Architectural 
Metalwork. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 66. 



Civil Service 

3. Canada. Royal Commission on Gov- 
ernment Organization. [Report]. Abridged 
ed. Vol. 1. Management of the Public Serv- 
ice. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1962. Pp. 228. 

The four sections of Vol. 1 are: 1. A Plan 
for Management. 2. Financial Management. 
3. Personnel Management. 4. Paperwork and 
Systems Management. 

4. Frankel, Saul Jacob. A Model for 
Negotiation and Arbitration between the 
Canadian Government and its Civil Serv- 
ants. Montreal, published by the Industrial 
Relations Centre, McGill University, 1962. 
Pp. 76. 

Discusses pay determination and the present 
system of negotiation and arbitration in the 
Canadian civil service. There is some com- 
parison with the British experience with sugges- 
tions of how some of it might be adopted in 
Canada. In conclusion, the author outlines a 
proposed Civil Service Arbitration Act which 
lays down the conditions and scope of arbitra- 
tion. 

Conferences 

5. American Statistical Association. 
Social Statistics Section. Proceedings, 
1961. Papers and Discussions presented at 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



165 



the 121st Annual Meeting of the American 
Statistical Association, New York City, De- 
cember 27-30, 1961 . . . Washington, 1962. 
Pp. 246. 

Some of the topics discussed were computer 
uses in social statistics, educational statistics, 
the methods of the 1961 Census of Canada, 
and developments in scientific and technical 
personnel statistics. 

6. Dalhousie Labour Institute for the 
Atlantic Provinces, Halifax, 1961. Dal- 
housie Labour Institute for the Atlantic 
Provinces, April 24-28, 1961. Halifax, Dal- 
housie Labour-University Committee, Insti- 
tue of Public Affairs, Dalhousie University, 
1961. Pp. 98. 

Partial Contents: Labour and Productivity — 
1. Labour Approaches and Policies, by Cleve 
Kidd. 2. A Management Point of View, by 
Maurice Fisher. Unemployment, by Russell 
Bell and William Woodfine. Labour-Manage- 
ment Relations in Sweden, by Thorbjorn 
Carlsson. Present Policies and Trends in Labour 
Legislation, by Bora Laskin. 

7. Industrial Relations Conference 
(Michigan). 7th, University of Michigan, 
1961. Critical Issues affecting Labor-Man- 
agement Relations. [Proceedings of] Seventh 
Annual Industrial Relations Conference, 
March 29-30, 1961. [Detroit, Institute of La- 
bor and Industrial Relations (University of 
Michigan-Wayne State University), 1962?]. 
Pp. 160. 

Conference sponsored by the Labor and 
Industrial Relations Center of Michigan State 
University and the Section on Labor Relations 
Law of the State Bar of Michigan. 

Topics discussed: Public Measures to In- 
crease Jobs and Protect Income. Impact of Job 
Security on Collective Bargaining. Collective 
Bargaining Approaches to Job Security. Work 
Rules and Practices. Collective Bargaining: 
New Approaches to the Problem of Achieving 
Agreement. 

8. International Conference for Wom- 
en Workers. 2nd, Gersau, Switzerland, 
1960. Report. Amsterdam, International 
Federation of Industrial Organizations and 
General Workers' Unions, 1962. 1 vol. 
(various pagings). 

Some of the topics discussed were social 
problems of women workers, ILO activities 
relating to women workers, equal pay for equal 
work, and how to recruit women into labour 
unions. 

9. "Resources for Tomorrow" Con- 
ference, Montreal, 1961. Proceedings. 
Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1962. Pp. 519. 

Conference held October 23-28, 1961, under 
the sponsorship of the federal Department of 
Northern Affairs and National Resources and 
all the provincial Governments. 

The Conference considered such "renewable" 
resources as are associated with agriculture, 
soil, water, forestry, fisheries, wildlife, and 
recreation. "... in relation to national, regional 
and provincial goals for economic development; 
some problems of resource policy, management 
and administration being identified, and guide- 
lines for action proposed." 



10. Social Security Conference. 4th, 
University of Michigan, 1962. The Labor 
Market and Social Security. Proceedings of 
the Fourth Annual Social Security Confer- 
ence, January 23 and 24, 1962, University 
of Michigan. Kalamazoo, W. E. Upjohn 
Institute for Employment Research, 1962. 
Pp. 168. 

Sponsored by the Institute of Labor and 
Industrial Relations (University of Michigan- 
Wayne State University) and the Labor and 
Industrial Relations Center, Michigan State 
University. 

Contents deal with postwar labour market 
developments; labour market lessons from 
abroad; the place of the employment service; 
the retraining issue; unemployment insurance 
and today's unemployment risks; depressed 
areas; retirement programs and the changing 
participation of the aged in the labour force. 

11. U.S. National Science Foundation. 
Scientific Manpower, 1961; Selected Papers 
delivered at the 1961 Annual Meetings of 
the American Statistical Association and 
the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 30. 

Contents: Three Years after the Hauser 
Committee Report on Scientific and Technical 
Personnel Data. Periodic Establishment Surveys 
of Employment in Science and Engineering. 
Studies of Demand for Scientific and Technical 
Personnel. Census-Related Studies of Scientific 
and Technical Personnel. Engineering and 
Science — a Struggle for Survival. 

Corporations 

12. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Financial Committees, by Norman 
E. Pflomm. New York, 1962. Pp. [66]. 

Discusses the advantages and disadvantages 
of financial committees. Contents: The Use of 
Finance Committees. The Finance Committee. 
The Capital Appropriations Committee. The 
Budget Committee. The Pension Committee. 
The Salary Committee. The General Account- 
ing Committee. 

13. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Inflation and Corporate Accounting, 
by Francis J. Walsh. New York, 1962. Pp. 
[103]. 

Contents: Impact of Inflation on Financial 
Statements. Considerations in making Price 
Level Adjustments. Viewpoints of Accounting 
Practitioners. Opinions of Accounting Societies 
and Government Agencies. Experience with 
Price Level Adjustments. 

Economic Conditions 

14. Geary, Robert Charles, Ed. Europe's 
Future in Figures. Contributors: J. Benard 
[and others]. Amsterdam, North-Holland 
Pub. Co., 1962. Pp. 343. 

Articles on long-term economic forecasting 
in Belgium, France, West Germany, Great 
Britain, Italy, Netherlands, and Switzerland, 
etc. 



166 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



15. Johnson, Harry Gordon. Canada 
in a Changing World Economy. Toronto, 
published in co-operation with Carleton 
University by University of Toronto Press, 
1962. Pp. 62. Alan B. Plaunt Memorial 
Lectures given at Carleton University in 
1962. 

Contents: The Changing Balance of Power 
in the World Economy. The Changing Inter- 
national Economic System. The European 
Economic Community. Strains on the American 
Dollar. Stagnation in the Canadian Economy, 
1958-1961. The Unemployment Problem. The 
Problem of Growth. The Problem of Foreign 
Trade. Choices in Canada's Commercial Policy. 

16. United Nations. Department of 
Economic and Social Affairs. World 
Economic Survey, 1961. New York, United 
Nations, 1962. Pp. 193. 

Education 

17. National Society for the Study 
of Education. Committee on In-Service 
Education. In-Service Education for Teach- 
ers, Supervisors, and Administrators. Edited 
by Nelson B. Henry. Chicago, NSSE; dis- 
tributed by the University of Chicago Press, 
1957. Pp. 376. 

Contents: The Need, History, and Basic 
Character of In-Service Education. Roles of 
Teachers, Administrators, and Consultants. In- 
Service Education Programs. Organization, Edu- 
cation, Training. 

18. Staton, Thomas Felix. How to 
Instruct Successfully; Modern Teaching 
Methods in Adult Education. New York, 
McGraw-Hill, 1960. Pp. 292. 

". . . Tells how to prepare and present a 
period or course of instruction." 

Education, Vocational 

19. Conference for Trade and In- 
dustrial Education. Central Region. 
Committee on Training Aids. Three- 
Dimensional Teaching Aids for Trade and 
Industrial Instruction. [Rev. ed.]. Compiled 
by Harold J. Rosengren. [Washington, GPO, 
1962]. Pp. 46. 

The original edition was prepared by the 
Conference for Trade and Industrial Education, 
North Atlantic Region, Committee on Teaching 
Aids. Contains photographs of a number ot 
instructional aids made by students or teachers, 
each one accompanied by a brief statement of 
the purpose of the teaching aid. 

20. U.S. Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training. Apprenticeship and Training in 
Carpentry Construction. Washington, GPO, 
1962. Pp. 56. 

". . . An examination of the scope of car- 
penter apprenticeship among unionized firms 
in the building construction industry." 

Employees' Benefit Plans 

21. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Digest of One Hundred Selected Health and 



Insurance Plans under Collective Bargain- 
ing, Winter 1961-62. Washington, GPO, 
1962. Pp. 215. 

Gives information about eligibility, require- 
ments, life insurance, accidental death and 
dismemberment, accident and sickness, and 
hospitalization in connection with the plans 
covered. 

22. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Health and Insurance, and Pension Plan 
Coverage in Union Contracts, Late 1960. 
Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 4. 

23. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Multi-Employer Pension Plans under Col- 
lective Bargaining: Prevalance, Benefit 
Provisions, Administrative Procedures, Func- 
tions of the Administrator, Individual Work- 
er's Pension Rights, Financial Management, 
Spring 1960. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 
131. Based on 736 plans covering 3.2 mil- 
lion workers. 

Labour Supply 

24. Baum, Samuel. The Labor Force of 
Hungary. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 34. 

One of the International Population Statistics 
Reports of the U.S. Bureau of the Census. 

25. Hartle, Douglas G. The Employ- 
ment Forecast Survey. Toronto, University 
of Toronto Press, cl962. Pp. 153. 

This is a study of the Employment Forecast 
Survey conducted by the Economics and Re- 
search Branch of the federal Department of 
Labour. 

26. U.S. Bureau of Employment Secur- 
ity. Telephone Communication, Labor Mar- 
ket Developments. Washington, 1962. Pp. 
13. 

27. U.S. President's Committee to 
Appraise Employment and Unemploy- 
ment Statistics. Measuring Employment 
and Unemployment. Washington, GPO, 
1962. Pp. 412. Robert A. Gordon, Chair- 
man. 

The Committee was asked by the President 
"to review the procedures used in collecting 
and tabulating statistics of employment and 
unemployment, the concepts used in classifying 
the labor force, and the analysis and publica- 
tion of final results." 

Labouring Classes 

28. Great Britain. Factory Inspector- 
ate. Annual Report of the Chief Inspector 
of Factories, 1961. London, HMSO, 1962. 
Pp. 102. 

29. McCarthy, J. Employment Services 
Placement of the Handicapped; Report on 
the International Seminar, Paris, llth-13th 
December 1961. [Project No. 8/08-B]. Paris, 
Organization for Economic Co-operation 
and Development, 1962. Pp. 20. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



167 



An account of an international seminar on 
the selection and training of employment service 
staff specializing in the placement of the handi- 
capped. 

30. U.S. Bureau of Labor-Management 
Reports. Union Financial Statistics; Selected 
Financial Data of Labor Organizations filing 
Annual Reports under the Labor-Manage- 
ment Reporting and Disclosure Act. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 66. 

Contains tables which show "total assets and 
liabilities as of the end of the union's fiscal 
year; total receipts during the fiscal year, dis- 
tributed by dues and 'other' ; and total disburse- 
ments distributed by payments of any kind to 
officers and employees, loans made and other 
disbursements." 

Professional Workers 

31. U.S. Bureau of Employment Secur- 
ity. Placement of Professional Personnel. 
Rev. ed. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 68. 

Provides information for those people, work- 
ing in U.S. local employment offices, who inter- 
view persons seeking professional, technical 
and management positions. 

32. U.S. Bureau of Employment Secur- 
ity. Professional Placement Service of the 
United States Employment Service. Wash- 
ington, 1962. Pp. 14. 

33. Wade, Worth. Business and the Pro- 
fessional Unions, with a Survey of Patent 
Clauses in Union Contracts. Ardmore, Penn., 
Advance House, Publisher, cl961. Pp. 34. 

The author considers these questions: "1. Is 
organization desirable for technical personnel? 

2. What is the trend in professional unions? 

3. Who owns the inventions of technical em- 
ployees? 4. What is the attitude of the unor- 
ganized scientist, the employer, the unions and 
the professional societies?" 

Transportation 

34. Canada. Royal Commission on 
Transportation. [Report). Vol. 3. Ottawa, 
Queen's Printer, 1962. Pp. 620. 

Contains studies prepared for the Royal 
Commission on various aspects of transporta- 
tion. 

35. U.S. Presidential Railroad Com- 
mission. Report. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 327. Appendix. V. 1-4. Washington, 
GPO, 1962. 4 vols. 

Contents of Appendices: V. 1. Index-Digest 
to the Record of the Commission's Hearings. 
V. 2. Pay Structure Study, Railroad Operating 
Employees. V. 3. Studies relating to Railroad 
Operating Employees. V. 4. Studies relating to 
Collective Bargaining Agreements and Practices 
outside the Railroad Industry. 

Wages and Hours 

36. Gifford, John Liddell King. Wages, 
Inflation, Productivity; Adequate Adjustment 



of Wages, Margins, Salaries to Inflation, 
Productivity, Prosperity. Sydney, Angus and 
Robertson, 1961. Pp. 163. 

"One purpose of this book is to point the 
way for all interested in securing adequate 
adjustment of minimum wages and salaries to 
inflation, and to increased productivity and 
prosperity." The book is intended as a textbook 
for first-year students in economics and statis- 
tics in Australian universities. 

37. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Industry Wage Survey: Eating and Drinking 
Places, June 1961. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 55. 

Summarizes wages and related information 
for employees of eating and drinking places in 
27 metropolitan areas in the U.S. Contains 
occupational descriptions. 

38. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Industry Wage Survey: Hotels and Motels, 
June 1961. Washington, GPO, 1962. Pp. 38. 

Summarizes wage and related information 
for employees of hotels, tourist courts, and 
motels in 23 metropolitan areas. Contains 
occupational descriptions. 

39. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.. 
Summary of Earnings Series, 1939-62. 
Washington, 1962. Pp. 12. 

40. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry, 
July 1, 1961 and Trend, 1907-61. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1962. Pp. 45. 

Miscellaneous 

41. DeGrazia, Sebastian. Of Time, Work, 
and Leisure. New York, Twentieth Century 
Fund, 1962. Pp. 559. 

This study by the Twentieth Century Fund 
examines the nature of leisure in an indus- 
trial society. 

42. Friedman, Milton. Price Theory, a 
Provisional Text. Chicago, Aldine Publish- 
ing Company, c!962. Pp. 285. 

The text of this book was developed from 
lecture notes prepared for the author's classes 
at the University of Chicago. 

43. Rothman, Stuart. What You should 
Know about the Regional Offices of the 
National Labor Relations Board; an Address 
at the Information Program for Labor and 
Management at the University of Illinois, 
April 19, 1962. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 39. 

44. Touzel, Bessie. The Province of 
Ontario — its Welfare Services. 4th ed. . . . 
rev. by Lillian Burke. Toronto, Ontario 
Welfare Council, 1962. Pp. 110. 

45. U.S. Internal Revenue Service. 
Statistics of Income: U.S. Business Tax 
Returns, 1959-60. Washington, GPO, 1962. 
Pp. 39. 



168 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-l to A-3— Labour Force 169 

Table B-l — Labour Income 171 

Tables C-l to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 172 

Tables D-l to D-5— Employment Service Statistics 178 

Tables E-l to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 183 

Tables F-l and F-2— Prices 186 

Tables G-l to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 187 



A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-l— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED JANUARY 19, 1963 

(estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



Canada 



Atlantic 
Region 



Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairie 
Region 



British 
Columbia 



The Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

14-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-44 years 

45-64 years 

65 years and over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agriculture 

Non-agriculture 

Paid Workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons not in the Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

*Less than 10,000. 



6,497 
4,741 
1,756 

572 

821 

2,966 

1,939 

199 

5,956 

4,273 
1,683 

538 
5,418 

4,945 
3,401 
1,544 

541 

468 

73 

5,850 
1,394 
4,456 



595 
444 
151 

65 
91 

248 

174 

17 

507 

364 
143 

32 
475 

426 
295 
131 



655 
179 
476 



1,833 

1,355 

478 

188 
273 
844 
481 
47 

1,641 

1,186 
455 

102 
1,539 

1,396 
971 
425 

192 
169 

23 

1,711 

393 

1,318 



2,377 

1,701 

676 

178 

261 

1,104 

750 

84 

2,247 

1,593 
654 

144 
2,103 

1,943 

1,337 

606 

130 
108 
22 

1,931 

422 

1,509 



1,100 
806 
294 

99 
135 
494 
339 

33 

1,027 

743 
284 

245 

782 

713 
466 
247 

73 
63 
10 

1,005 
259 
746 



592 
435 
157 

42 
61 

276 
195 

18 

534 

387 
147 

15 
519 

467 
332 
135 

58 

48 
10 

548 
141 

407 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

64193-6—5 



• FEBRUARY 1963 



169 



TABLE A-&— AGE, SEX AND MARITAL STATUS, WEEK ENDED 
JANUARY 19, 1963 

(estimates in thousands) 

Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



Total 



14-19 
year? 

all 
persons 



20-64 years 



Men 



Married Other 



Women 



Married Other 



65 years 
and over 

all 
persons 



Population 14 years of age and overd>. 



Labour force 

Employed... 
Unemployed. 



Not in labour force . 

Participation rate*** 
1963, January 19... 
1962. December 15. 



Unemployment rate<*> 
1963, January 19.... 
1962, December 15 



12,347 

6,497 

5,956 

541 

5,850 



52.6 
53.3 



8.3 
6.3 



572 
486 



1,292 



30.7 
31.9 



15.0 
12.2 



3,584 

3,439 

3.175 

264 

145 



96.0 
96.4 



7.7 
5.7 



973 

827 
697 
130 

146 



85.0 
S5.4 



15.7 
12.0 



3,676 



794 
25 



2,857 



22.3 
23.4 



3.1 

2.0 



921 



617 
24 



280 



69.6 
69.6 



3.7 
3.0 



1,329 



187 
12 



1,130 



15.0 
15.4 



0)Excludea inmates of institutions, members of the armed services, Indians living on reserves and residents of the 
Yukon and Northwest Territories. 

G)The labour force as a percentage of the population 14 years of age and over. 
<»>The unemployed as a percentage of the labour force. 
•Less than 10,000 unemployed. 



TABLE A-3- UNEMPLOYED, WEEK ENDED JANUARY 19, 1963 

(estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 




Jan. 
1962 



Total unemployed 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work. . . 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1 — 3 months 

Seeking 4 — 6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months . . 



545 

39 
506 

484 
22 

133 

231 

75 

67 



170 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



B — Labour Income 

TABLE B-l— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

Note: Monthly and quarterly figures may not add to annual totals because of rounding. 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals* 1 ' 


Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation < 2 > 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 


Totals 

(3) 


1957— Total.... 
1958— Total.... 
1959— Total.... 
1960— Total. . . . 
1961— Total. . . . 

1961— 
November. . . 


535 
527 
552 
551 
545 

46.2 
45.5 

45.8 
45.2 
45.6 
45.1 

47.0 
48.2 
48.7 
48.3 
47.6 
47.1 
46.8 


4,838 
4,823 
5,096 
5,188 
5,348 

458.8 
451.3 

450.7 
455.9 
461.1 
469.0 
481.7 
492.1 
485.0 
490.6 
498.4 
493.3 
489.9 


1,661 
1,685 
1,785 
1,806 
1,862 

158.1 
152.0 

151.2 
152.1 
150.3 
153.8 
160.1 
161.6 
165.7 
166.9 
164.3 
165.3 
162.1 


336 
270 
288 
326 
285 

85.1 


1,311 
1,317 
1,279 
1,245 
1,225 

311.5 


277 
307 
332 
344 
356 

89.9 


2,265 
2,360 
2,528 
2,638 
2,737 

712.2 


3,920 
4,303 
4,653 
5,019 
5,475 

1,413.5 


683 

727 
746 
790 
827 

211.9 


16,018 
16,521 
17,463 
18,119 
18,884 

1,625.1 
1,585.8 


1962— 

January 

February 














1,565.7 


68.2 


255.6 


89.7 


687.7 


1,421.5 


212.0 


1,575.7 
1,590.5 
















1,618.8 




65.7 


333.2 


93.3 


718.1 


1,475.0 


218.1 


1,677.1 




1,726.2 


July. 














1,711.5 


August 

September. . . 


85.8 


397.8 


98.3 


726.1 


1,456.1 


222.2 


1,725.1 
1,749.2 














1,734 7 
















1,713.1 



















(^Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 
^Includes post office wages and salaries. 

^Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining 
columns of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. 
•Revised. 
fPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



171 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees; 
at November 1962 employers in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total 
employment of 2,963,858. Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat 
smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage-earners for 
whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate 
to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-l— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Year and Month 



Averages 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1961 — 

November . 

December.. 

1962— 

January 

February.. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October*... 
November! 



Industrial Composite^ 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



122.6 
117.9 
119.7 
118.7 
118.1 



121. 
117. 



115.2 
114.7 
115.2 
116.7 
121.3 
125.0 
125.8 
127.0 
126.5 
125.4 
124.2 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



158.1 
163.9 
171.0 
176.5 
181.8 



183. 
179. 



184. 
186. 

1ST. 
186. 

188. 



Average 

Weekly 

Wages 

and 

Salaries 



67.93 
70.43 
73.47 
75.83 
78.11 



78.82 
77.08 



79.27 
80.21 
80.41 
80.21 
80.79 
81.05 



81.40 
81.57 
81.58 



Manufacturing 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



115.8 
109.8 
111.1 
109.5 
108.9 



110.9 
107.9 



108.5 
108.9 
109.6 
110.4 
113.7 
116.4 
115.5 
117.6 
117.6 
115.9 
114.7 



Average 

Weekly 

Wages 

and 

Salaries 



159.1 
165.3 
172.5 

177.8 



186.2 
182.3 



187.1 
188.2 
189.3 
189.0 
190.4 
190.4 
189.1 
187.9 
190.8 
191.8 
192.4 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



69.94 
72.67 
75.84 
78.19 
80.73 



81.87 



82.28 
82.74 
83.23 
83.11 
83.72 
83.72 
83.13 
82.62 
83.91 
84.34 
84.58 



(^Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and recrea- 
tional service). 

•Revised. 

tPreliminary. 



172 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



TABLE C-fc-AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Area 


Employment Index 


Numbers 


Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 


Nov. 
1962 


Oct. 
1962 


Nov. 
1961 


Nov. 
1962 


Oct. 

1962 


Nov. 
1961 


Provinces 


137.9 
145.4 
96.2 
104.8 
125.5 
126.2 
112.1 
125.9 
158.0 
116.7 

124.2 

155.3 

79.6 
125.1 
117.9 
106.1 
108.4 
125.2 
112.9 

83.0 
117.3 

83.4 
129.2 
136.1 
121.6 

95.5 
195.3 
142.2 
116.5 
114.6 

95.4 

87.1 
129.7 
117.9 
136.4 
129.0 

89.3 
137.2 
126.2 

75.3 
145.1 
108.9 
111.5 
143.1 
138.8 
203.0 
178.2 
115.8 
119.9 


147.3 
154.3 
96.6 
107.6 
126.4 
126.2 
115.3 
130.6 
161.9 
118.3 

125.4 

154.7 

79.0 
124.1 
112.5 
106.1 
110.8 
125.5 
114.1 

83.1 
119.1 

84.6 
129.8 
136.2 
120.6 

95.8 
192.6 
141.4 
114.5 
114.3 
100.4 

87.9 
129.9 
116.9 
137.2 
128.7 

89.2 
139.2 
129.5 

74.7 
147.0 
110.4 
113.8 
144.5 
142.9 
207.6 
182.3 
115.6 
118.1 


149.2 
144.1 
97.5 
107.5 
123.3 
122.0 
111.4 
124.2 
155.5 
113.1 

121.6 

148.7 

80.0 
126.7 
113.1 
110.1 
109.6 
119.1 
111.2 
100.4 
114.8 

83.4 
127.5 
134.3 
115.3 

91.4 
181.0 
136.5 
111.0 
112.7 

96.2 

83.2 
121.2 
106.2 
127.9 
146.8 

90.1 
136.0 
127.0 

74.0 
143.8 
109.0 
110.8 
138.5 
137.6 
197.6 
175.2 
112.0 
110.2 


$ 

71.88 
56.00 
65.70 
65.64 
79.17 
84.88 
75.91 
78.51 
82.63 
88.70 

81.58 

60.03 
77.66 
67.32 
61.12 
65.97 

100.01 
71.07 
68.70 
89.88 
77.32 
67.74 
80.56 
75.32 
80.62 
91.31 

108.40 
84.62 
90.25 
96.03 
82.96 
77.00 
76.00 
73.49 
77.08 
91.24 
75.57 
77.83 

106.11 
95.30 

106.22 
83.76 
72.75 
76.75 
72.44 
77.19 
81.20 
86.89 
80.57 


$ 

74.00 
56.22 
66.92 
65.49 
78.94 
84.80 
76.55 
78.37 
83.12 
88.71 

81.57 

61.02 
82.45 
67.86 
61.90 
65.75 

100.70 
70.70 
69.03 
88.40 
76.88 
67.18 
80.67 
76.32 
80.04 
91.71 
98.77 
84.96 
90.78 
93.72 
81.55 
77.01 
76.80 
72.88 
77.41 
92.25 
74.51 
77.46 

105.23 
92.87 

100.45 
82.78 
72.90 
76.66 
73.03 
77.58 
81.46 
86.79 
80.17 


S 
73.10 




55.58 




65.16 




64.30 




76.36 




81.54 




74.05 




74.71 




81.39 




86.59 




78.82 


Urban areas 


57.62 




79.01 




65.48 




60.02 




62.93 




98.48 




67.47 




65.25 




85.91 




74.45 




62.44 




78.19 


Ottawa — Hull 


73.41 




76.88 




88.32 




96.23 




81.60 




86.71 




86.69 




82.57 




74.02 




73.04 


Gait 


71.45 




75.40 




91.40 




72.82 




74.99 




101.54 




88.27 




98.58 


Fort William— Port Arthur 


82.11 




70.90 




74.11 




69.83 




75.64 




77.91 




84.68 




77.78 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

64193-6—6 



• FEBRUARY 7963 



173 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 

Note: Information for other industries is given in Employment and Payrolls 



Industry 



Employment 



Nov. 
1962 



Oct. 

1962 



Nov. 
1961 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 



Nov. 
1962 



Oct. 

1962 



Nov. 
1961 



Mining...... 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Other chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



114.3 

127.8 
68.6 

182.8 
84.6 
39.6 

268.2 

140.3 

114.7 

118.8 
111. 
116. 
137. 
122. 
95. 
113. 



109. 

90. 

97. 

78. 

83. 

74. 

63. 

93. 

92. 

98. 

95. 

75. 
106. 
107. 
119. 

72. 
127. 
126. 
129. 
126, 
111. 

65, 
153. 
111. 
105. 

96, 
131, 
124. 
116. 
112, 
113, 
234, 
119, 
122, 

56, 
143. 
122. 
142. 
101. 
132. 
152. 
113. 
278. 
151. 

91. 
168. 
136, 
139. 
130. 
122. 
144. 
129. 
154. 

131. 

127. 
137. 
141. 

155. 

132. 
133. 
124. 



116.1 

129.3 
68.8 

185.4 
82.7 
39.2 

260.5 

154.7 

115.9 

119.7 

112.6 

121.7 

137.6 

139.9 

98.8 

112.8 

97.7 

81.0 

110.1 

89.7 

95.8 

78.5 

83.5 

74.6 

62.8 

93.5 

94.8 

99.0 

100.3 

76.4 

109.9 

111.3 

120.7 

81.4 

128.2 

128.7 

127.1 

126.5 

112.4 

62.0 

159.2 

111.4 

110.8 

95.9 

131.5 

126.0 

119.6 

111.5 

113.4 

239.2 

116.8 

120.9 

55.7 

146.5 

123.0 

144.1 

102.8 

132.3 

153.2 

112.9 

280.9 

151.0 

95.8 

149.9 

138.2 

140.2 

131.3 

123.1 

143.9 

130.5 

154.1 

137.6 

134.5 
142.5 
141.5 

157.7 

135.7 
132.7 

125.4 



116.6 

130.1 
69.5 

186.4 
87.8 
44.1 

275.1 

139.9 

110.9 

112.8 

109.4 

116.6 

138.9 

118.6 

100.2 

111.8 

100.9 

91.8 

102.4 

89.4 

96.2 

77.2 

81.3 

75.7 

62.4 

86.5 

91.5 

94.7 

95.8 

74.9 

103.2 

104.2 

113.1 

78.9 

123.9 

123.9 

124.0 

125.7 

103.6 

57.8 

148.1 

104.3 

101.1 

91.3 

117.7 

117.2 

104.2 

110.9 

108.9 

261.1 

110.0 

104.4 

56.4 

130.7 

125.2 

140.1 

104.6 

140.2 

140.0 

102.0 

249.1 

142.0 

88.7 

162.5 

135.4 

138.4 

131.3 

120.6 

154.6 

128.8 

146.5 

127.9 

124.7 
133.2 
139.8 

150.7 

129.2 
126.3 

121.6 



$ 
100. 74 

101.41 
83.59 

107.61 

104.91 
76.17 

122.28 
90.63 

84.58 
91.99 
77.96 
72/88 
82.48 
57.40 
83.19 
69.67 

103.19 
77.25 
89.24 
57.71 
55.27 
63.22 
68.77 
65.82 
63.39 
76.37 
51.85 
51.19 
51.38 
53.37 
73.39 
75.18 
72.17 
64.68 
98.14 

107.02 
77.48 
91.15 
96.24 
99.22 
98.40 
85.17 
83.22 
90.31 
92.59 

111.81 
91.85 
96.69 

100.89 
98.39 

123.10 

100.50 
84.80 
88.89 
95.80 
93.21 
91.70 

105.02 
90.27 
98.42 
87.40 
89.60 
81.26 
86.76 

122.01 

122.95 
99.89 
86.88 

114.14 
99.32 
72.65 

87.63 

95.31 
75.89 
86.72 

58.15 

44.27 
50.76 

81.58 



$ 
99.65 

100.78 
82.88 

106.95 

105.15 
80.38 

120.38 
86.75 

84.34 

91.47 
77.99 
72.27 
83.53 
56.48 
82.41 
69.57 

103.03 
86.55 
89.75 
56.76 
54.00 
62.86 
67.42 
64.02 
63.00 
73.94 
52.74 
51.66 
53.40 
54.69 
73.30 
74.99 
72.33 
64.49 
99.61 

107.85 
79.63 
90.96 
96.35 
93.80 
98.80 
84.68 
84.18 
91.31 
92.56 

113.02 
92.61 
95.74 
98.52 
98.26 

115.52 
96.63 
84.46 
91.32 
96.03 
93.22 
91.91 

105.20 
90.58 
98.62 
87.08 
89.65 
79.47 
86.87 

121.49 

122.61 
99.57 
87.88 

113.53 
98.83 
72.85 

88.21 
95.43 
76.99 
86.60 

57.92 

44.09 
50.72 

81.57 



$ 
97.75 

99.52 
81.94 

105.61 
98.81 
77.35 

113.55 
88.27 

81.87 
88.69 
75.97 
70.88 
80.52 
56.15 
80.89 
67.96 
98.01 
76.89 
85.88 
55.84 
53.11 
61.97 
65.86 
63.24 
62.42 
71.58 
50.86 
49.70 
50.80 
51.84 
71.27 
73.11 
69.79 
63.36 
96.63 

104.87 
77.29 
88.68 
92.65 
95.97 
94.22 
81.87 
79.63 
89.29 
88.91 

106.96 
88.64 
93.25 
95.06 
97.84 

110.71 
91.09 
83.63 
84.32 
93.47 
89.51 
88.14 

102.58 
89.55 
96.41 
87.27 
86.23 
78.29 
84.06 

119.86 

120.50 
96.27 
83.82 

108.47 
95.87 
71.81 

83.08 

90.89 
70.81 
82.98 

56.08 

42.78 
48.88 

78.82 



174 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



TABLE C-4— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING, BY PROVINCE 

(Hourly Rated Wage-Earners) 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 
Note: Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 





Average Hours Worked 


Average Hourly Earnings* 




November 
1962 


October 
1962 


November 
1961 


November 
1962 


October 
1962 


November 
1961 




38.2 
39.9 
40.9 
42.1 
41.4 
40.0 
39.0 
39.6 

38.1 


38.1 
40.9 
41.0 
42.3 
41.5 
40.2 
38.9 
40.0 

37.9 


38.4 
40.8 
41.1 
42.2 
41.1 
39.7 
38.5 
40.0 

38.4 


$ 

1.69 
1.64 
1.61 
1.70 
2.00 
1.77 
2.00 
2.00 

2.32 


$ 
1.69 
1.64 
1.60 
1.70 
1.99 
1.76 
1.98 
1.99 

2.29 


$ 
1.74 




1.56 




1.63 




1.66 




1.93 




1.73 




1.98 


Alberta (includes Northwest Territories) 
British Columbia (includes Yukon 


1.98 
2.26 







•Includes shift differential, premium pay for overtime, pay for paid holidays, pay for paid sick leave if paid through 
payroll but not if paid under insurance plan, incentive bonus but not annual bonus. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

64193-&— 6h 



• FEBRUARY 1963 



175 



TABLE C-5— HOURS AND EARNINGS, BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry- 



Average Weekly 
Hours 



Nov. 
1962 



Oct. 
1962 



Nov. 
1961 



Average Hourly 
Earnings 



Nov. Oct. Nov. 
1962 1962 1961 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Nov. Oct. Nov. 
1962 1962 



Mining. 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

•Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries. . . 
•Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

•Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

•Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and appli 
ances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

•Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Professional and scientific equipment 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

•Durable manufactured goods industries. 

176 



42.2 

42.4 
43.7 
41.9 
40.6 
40.4 
40.9 
43.4 
41.2 
41.9 
40.5 
39.9 
40.4 
38.7 
41.4 
40.8 
41.6 
39.0 
37.6 
42.9 
41.2 
40.8 
42.1 
43.2 
41.6 
43.6 
44.5 
38.5 
38.5 
36.2 
41.7 
41.7 
40.5 
44.0 
42.7 
41.3 
41.2 
41.5 
38.8 
41.9 
40.5 
43.0 
43.5 
41.7 
41.8 
42.8 
41.1 
41.5 
42.3 
42.2 
40.7 
46.0 
43.4 
39.2 
40.2 
41.2 
42.5 
41.5 
40.5 
41.3 
42.0 
41.1 

41.0 
41.7 
41.0 
43.5 
43.0 
41.5 
41.2 
41.2 
41.2 
39.8 
41.6 
41.8 
40.5 
40.8 
40.9 
40.7 
44.0 
38.0 
37.9 
40.1 



42.3 



42.2 
43.7 
41.7 
41.6 
42.9 
39.6 
43.2 
41.3 
41.9 
40.8 
40.3 
41.1 
39.2 
41.3 
41.0 
42.7 
38.9 



40.2 
43.3 
40.5 
39.8 
42.3 
42.9 
41.2 
43.3 
4-1.2 
39.2 
38.8 
37.1 
42.6 
41.7 



40.5 

44.2 

42.7 

41.7 

41.8 

41.6 

38.9 

41.9 

37.3 

43.5 

43.6 

42.1 

42.2 

42 

41 

42 

42 

41 

41 

41 

42 

39 

41 

41 

42 

41 

40 

41 

42 



41.1 

40.2 
43.0 
41.4 
43.7 
42.9 
41.1 
41.3 
41.3 
41.2 
40.2 
41.7 
42.1 
40.7 
41.7 
41.4 
42.3 
43.9 
37.9 
37.6 
40.3 



42.6 

42.9 
43.2 
42.7 
41.0 
41.4 
40.3 
43.6 
41.1 
41.6 
40.7 
40.1 
40.4 
39.0 
42.8 
41.6 
40.8 
39.3 
39.4 
42.3 
41.6 
41.1 
42.6 
43.0 
41.9 
43.8 
44.2 
38.6 
38.1 
36.6 
42.2 
41.9 
40.8 
44.0 
43.1 
41.6 
41.6 
41.7 
39.3 
41.1 
40.0 
41.2 
42.6 
41.0 
42.6 



11 



40.8 
41.8 
41.5 
42.5 
44.3 
40.6 
39.1 
40.0 
41.0 
41.9 
41.3 
40.4 
41.8 
41.4 
41.5 

40.6 
42.7 
42.5 
43.1 



42. 

41. 

41 

41 

40. 

39. 

41, 

42. 

41.3 

40.6 

40.7 

40.2 

43.3 

38.4 

38.0 

40.1 



$ 
2.20 

2.26 
1.79 
2.45 
2.13 
1.82 
2.57 
2.00 
1.90 
2.07 
1.73 
1.63 
1.92 
1.23 
1.84 
1.55 
2.17 
2.39 
1.88 
1.96 
1.30 
1.25 
1.40 
1.44 
1.47 
1.33 
1.54 
1.22 
1.22 
1.27 
1.17 
1.68 
1.79 
1.52 
1.39 
2.25 
2.45 
1.72 
2.32 
2.19 
2.25 
2.18 
1.83 
1.85 
2.08 
2.04 
2.62 
2.08 
2.17 
2.27 
2.16 
2.58 
2.21 
2.11 
2.17 
2.16 
1.94 
2.07 
2.42 
1.91 
2.14 
1.72 

1.96 
2.14 
1.80 
1.94 
1.74 
1.96 
2.69 
2.72 
2.12 
1.64 
2.47 
1.52 
1.88 
2.07 
2.27 
1.72 
1.98 
1.12 
1.08 
1.07 



$ 
2.18 

2.26 
1.77 
2.45 
2.09 
1.84 
2.52 
1.97 
1.89 
2.05 
1.73 
1.61 
1.92 
1.23 
1.83 
1.54 
2.18 
2.38 
2.00 
1.96 
1.30 
1.25 
1.40 
1.43 
1.46 
1.33 
1.52 
1.22 
1.22 
1.30 
1.15 
1.67 
1.78 
1.52 
1.39 
2.26 
2.44 
1.75 
2.32 
2.19 
2.20 
2.17 
1.82 
1.87 
2.08 
2.05 
2.64 
2.07 
2.14 
2.24 
2.16 
2.49 
2.16 
2.10 
2.2. 
2.16 
1.93 
2.07 
2.43 
1.91 
2.14 
1.71 

1.95 
2.17 
1.81 
1.93 
1.72 
1.95 
2.66 
2.70 
2.11 
1.65 
2.44 
1.52 
1.87 
2.07 
2.25 
1.73 
1.98 
1.12 
1.08 
1.06 



$ 
2.14 

2.20 
1.75 
2.38 
2.05 
1.83 
2.38 
1.96 
1.84 
2.00 
1.69 
1.60 
1.87 
1.21 
1.81 
1.48 
2.04 
2.34 
1.81 
1.91 
1.25 
1.20 
1.37 
1.39 
1.42 
1.31 
1.45 
1.19 
1.19 
1.23 
1.12 
1.62 
1.74 
1.48 
1.35 
2.19 
2.38 
1.70 
2.25 
2.13 
2.18 
2.09 
1.77 
1.82 
2.01 
2.00 
2.55 
2.04 
2.10 
2.17 
2.14 
2.39 
2.10 
2.08 
2.06 
2.14 
1.86 
2.01 
2.40 
1.89 
2.11 
1.75 

1.92 
2.07 
1.80 
1.87 
1.71 
1.88 
2.64 
2.66 
2.06 
1.59 
2.38 
1.49 
1.85 
1.98 
2.17 
1.64 
1.91 
1.08 
1.05 
1.04 



$ 
92.75 

95.89 
78.05 

102.64 
86.56 
73.60 

105.43 
86.95 

78. 15 
86.57 
70.22 
65.32 
77.45 
47.72 
76.06 
63.28 
90.36 
93.10 
70.79 
83.85 
53.56 
51.15 
59.06 
62.19 
61.36 
57.95 
68.48 
46.92 
46.89 
45.85 
48.84 
69.86 
72.71 
67.02 

59. 16 
92.82 

100.92 
71.58 
89.96 
91.85 
90.97 
93.59 
79.52 
76.99 
86.78 
87.45 

107.76 
86.27 
91.83 
95.97 
87.94 

118.89 
96.55 
82.81 
87.30 
89.16 
82.56 
86.05 
98.20 
78.82 
89.77 
70.61 

80.30 
89.29 
73.89 
84.33 
74.63 
81.27 
110.81 
112.03 
87.51 
65.30 
102.57 
63.63 
76.22 
84.66 
92.62 
70.08 
87.18 
42.52 
40.89 
42.71 



$ 
92.18 

95.31 
77.24 
102.05 
87.17 
79.15 
99.75 
85.00 
77.96 
85.95 
70.50 
65.04 
79.18 
48.17 

75. eo 

63.34 
92.85 
92.59 
80.28 
85.16 
52.53 
49.61 
59.06 
61.31 
60.30 
57.53 
67.21 
47.89 
17.43 
48.07 
48.89 
69.67 
72.24 
67.28 
59.39 
94.18 

102.11 
72.94 
90.13 
91.83 
82.28 
94.32 
79.13 
78.76 
87.68 
87.59 

108.73 
87.22 
90.60 
93.38 
88.81 

110.21 
91.44 
82.43 
90.40 
89.49 
82.49 
86.46 
98.37 
79.31 
90.09 
70.35 

78.57 
93.20 
74.97 
84.47 
73.89 
80.16 
110.01 
111.40 
87.07 
66.49 
101.63 
63.87 
76.21 
86.11 
93.23 
73.04 
86.90 
42.37 
40.53 
42.78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 



Period 



Hours 
Worked 
Per week 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 



Current 
Dollars 



1949 
Dollars 



Monthly Average 1957 
Monthly Average 1958 
Monthly Average 1959 
Monthly Average 1960 
Monthly Average 1961 

Last Pay Period in: 

1961 November... 
December 

1962 January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October* , 

Novemberf. . 



40.4 
40.2 
40.7 
40.4 
40.6 



1.61 
1.66 
1.72 
1.78 
1.83 



1.84 

1.88 

1.86 
1.86 
1.87 
1.89 
1.89 
1.88 
1.87 



64.96 
66.77 
70.16 
71.96 
74.27 



75.64 
72.85 

75.47 
75.99 
76.68 
76.50 
77.51 
77.52 
76.72 
76.17 
77.61 
77.96 
78.15 



155.6 
160.0 
168.1 
172.4 
177.9 



181.2 
174.5 



182.1 
183.7 
183.3 
185.7 
185.7 
183.8 
182.5 
185.9 
186.8 
187.2 



127.4 
127.7 
132.8 
134.5 
137.7 



139.6 
134.6 

139.3 
140.4 
141.0 
140.9 
142.3 
141.8 
139.9 
139.3 
141.4 
141.6 
142.0 



Note: The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. 

•Revised. 

fPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



177 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

Statistics presented in the following tables relate to registrations for employment and 
vacancies notified by employers at NES offices. These data are derived from reports 
prepared in National Employment Service offices and processed in the Unemployment 
Insurance Section, D.B.S. See also Technical Note, page 1089, September 1962 issue. 

TABLE D-l— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Period 



Unfilled Vacancies* 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



End of: 

January 1958... 

January 1959... 

January 1960. . . 

January 1961... 

January 1962... 

February 1962... 
March 1962... 
April 1962... 

May 1962... 

June 1962... 

July 1962... 

August 1962... 
September 1962.. 
October 1962... 
November 1962... 
December 1962&> 

January 1963&). 



6,822 
9,425 
8,206 
8,866 

11,428 

12,308 
15,184 
25,557 
22,026 
22,436 
22,872 
21,214 
20,197 
20,137 
22,077 
14,281 



7,860 
9.295 
10,325 
8,346 

12,069 

13,073 
15,359 
18,868 
20,999 
20,672 
17,895 
21,256 
20,658 
17,399 
19,204 
13,638 



14,682 
18,720 
18,531 
17,212 

23,497 

25,381 
30,543 
44,425 
43,025 
43,108 
40,767 
42,470 
40,855 
37,536 
41,281 
27,919 



661,965 
615,788 
606, 165 
668,766 

570,061' 

585,555 
579,641 
496,099 
329,391 
237,747 
224,452 
198,639 
188,844 
232,316 
328,801 
473,575 



167,512 
175,574 
180,129 
185,972 

161,094 

161,992 
158,342 
146,551 
126,461 
119,561 
113,407 
96,606 
97,890 
105,488 
127,955 
137,429 



829,477 
791,362 
786,294 
854,738 

731,155 

747,547 
737,983 
642,650 
455,852 
357,308 
337,859 
295,245 
286,734 
337,804 
456,756 
611,004 



(^Latest figures subject to revision. 

'Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-2— REGISTRATIONS RECEIVED, VACANCIES NOTIFIED AND 

PLACEMENTS EFFECTED DURING YEAR, 1958-1961, AND DURING 

MONTH, DECEMBER 1961-DECEMBER 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Year and Month 


Registrations Received 


Vacancies Notified 


Placements Effected 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


1958- Year 


2,790,412 

2,753,997 

3,046,572 

3,125,195 

361,979 

343,460 
244,177 
250,908 
226,940 
239,245 
231,507 
251,079 
236,921 
220,755 
272,614 
321,696 
338,121t 


1,012,974 

1,037,536 

1,107,427 

1,106,790 

91,992 

109,466 
75,220 
81,800 
79,051 
95,925 
100,426 
114,963 
104,366 
98,476 
103,871 
113,014 
94,465t 


620,394 

753,904 

724,098 

836,534 

62,933 

57,373 
56,595 
60,933 
82,893 

117,362 
92,346 
97,147 

102,784 
96,217 

101,603 
86,859 
58,253 


374,245 

421,927 

404,824 

469,119 

36,436 

35,946 
30,459 
37,064 
40,026 
51,441 
48,564 
56,863 
63,558 
50,615 
45,949 
43,840 
40,470 


548,663 

661,872 

641,872 

748,790 

61,219 

49,668 
48,546 
50,161 
65,841 
107,811 
86,218 
85,399 
89,871 
91,653 
89,619 
74,957 
57,541 


291,466 


1959- Year 


324,201 


1960- Year 


316,428 


1961- Year 


371,072 


1961-December 


35,284 


1962- January 


26,878 




22,688 




27,365 




29,194 




38,595 




39,253 


July 


49,523 




50,865 




42,692 




38,324 




33,481 




39,613 







tPreliminary. 



178 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



TABLE D-3— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED, BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX, 
DURING DECEMBER 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Industry Group 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change 

from 

December 

1961 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping , 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except clothing) 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries. . . 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment 

Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

Public Utility Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

Government Service 

Recreation Service 

Business Service 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



1,022 
1,737 

518 

218 

177 
59 
21 
43 

8,525 
833 
46 
60 
161 
280 
292 

1,371 
436 
450 

1,826 

1,370 
225 
400 
248 
24 
206 
297 

7,175 

4,513 
2,662 

1,605 

4,290 



94 

5,403 

1,913 
3,490 



28,096 

695 
22,995 

276 
1,184 
2,946 



1,490 
21 

54 

9 
22 
4 

19 

4,229 

543 
2 

36 
208 
244 
1,175 
145 
155 
273 
252 
132 

82 
482 

99 

18 
141 
242 

126 



202 

103 

21 
78 

26 

5,565 

792 
4,773 

569 

27,331 

994 

17,293 

125 

482 

8,437 



2,512 
1,758 

572 

227 
199 
63 
21 
62 

12,754 

1,376 

48 

96 

369 

524 

1,467 

1,516 

591 

723 

2,078 

1,502 

307 

882 

347 

42 

347 

539 

7,301 

4,576 
2,725 

4,807 

4,393 
247 
167 

120 

10,968 

2,705 
8,263 

935 

55,427 

1,689 

40,288 

401 

1,666 
11,383 



+ 1,613 

+ 109 

68 

- 30 

17 

3 



443 

63 
190 
27 
27 
60 
60 
103 
402 
170 
580 
61 
51 
194 
61 
5 
63 
34 

545 

781 
236 

860 

935 
35 
40 

214 

932 

164 

768 

78 



+ 1,027 

+ 8 
- 178 
+ 113 
+ 287 
+ 797 



57,541 



39,613 



97,154 



651 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



179 



TABLE D-4- REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX, 

AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1962[»] 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Occupational Group 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Professional & Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Personal & Domestic Service Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Food and kindred products (incl. tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay & glass products 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment , 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications & public utility 

Trade and Service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices , 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber & lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

GRAND TOTAL 



9,438 
18,672 

8,902 
40,037 

4,114 

7,730 

211,856 
1,977 
4,102 

23,138 

1,512 

1,481 

764 

15,967 

2,727 

935 

2,646 

67,146 

40, 180 
1,062 
6,449 

29,087 
5,070 
7,613 

172,826 

8,049 

18,580 

7,584 

91,293 

47,320 



1,965 

42,496 

11,724 

26,897 

66 

701 

23,724 

664 

15,588 

199 

551 

1,264 

63 

878 

1,097 

41 

9 
111 

1 

1,953 

965 

238 

102 

29,856 

10,796 

396 

561 

1 

18,102 



11,403 

61,168 

20,626 

66,934 

4,180 

8,431 

235,580 

2,641 

19,690 

23,337 

2,063 

2,745 

827 

16,845 

3,824 

976 

2,646 

67,155 

40,291 

1,063 

8,402 

30,052 

5,308 

7,715 

202,682 
18,845 
18,976 
8,145 
91,294 
65,422 



473,575 



137,429 



611,004 



^Preliminary— subject to revision. 



180 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



TABLE D-5-REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, AT 

DECEMBER 31, 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


Dec. 31 
1962 


Previous 

Year 

Dec. 29 

1961 


u) 

Dec. 31 

1962 


Previous 

Year 
Dec. 29 

1961 


Newfoundland 


23,495 

5,075 
2,591 
15,829 

4,698 

2,883 
1,815 

28,142 

1,350 
1,881 
5,918 

969 
2,516 

659 
3,800 
1,043 
4,273 
1,516 
1,950 
2,267 

28,916 

4,769 
2,232 
1,923 
2,142 

383 
7,669 
2,731 
3,341 
1,467 

666 
1,593 

195,639 

2,655 
1,003 
1,131 
1,355 
1,231 
1,844 
2,158 
2,344 

465 
1,317 
2,453 

620 

812 
1,792 
3,394 
4,215 
4,596 
3,127 
1,252 
1,266 
2,085 

804 
3,958 
1,312 

829 

731 
2,992 

985 
2,183 
64,315 
1,791 
1,419 
13,522 
3,998 
4,807 
1,415 
2,367 
1,080 
1,194 
2,697 
2,563 
2,606 
3,326 
2,408 
4,881 
5,690 


21,268 

4,316 
2,025 
14,927 

4,447 

2,645 
1,802 

27,119 

1,190 
1,658 
4,966 

981 
2,241 

629 
3,608 
1,020 
5,067 
1,433 
1,959 
2,367 

27,334 

4,930 
1,804 
2,125 
1,625 

420 
7,286 
2,477 
3,261 
1,421 

627 
1,358 

187,701 

2,487 

666 

1,096 

1,464 

1,160 

1,810 

2,136 

2,445 

403 

1,274 

2,487 

744 

927 

1,694 

3,033 

3,997 

4,543 

2,799 

935 

1,098 

2,148 

1,131 

4,072 

1,225 

722 

772 

2,644 

991 

2,030 

61,778 

1,880 

1,388 

13,201 

4,531 

4,750 

1,491 

2,375 

906 

1,065 

2,365 

2,453 

2,226 

2,485 

2,422 

4,847 

5,365 


Quebec— Concluded 
Sorel 


2,501 
2,317 
6,004 
1,713 
2,695 
2,602 
2,819 

179,398 

438 

1,357 

1,759 

1,213 

1,299 

2,709 

730 

371 

2,568 

955 

1,050 

3,151 

424 

808 

702 

2,627 

1,375 

398 

700 

1,544 

11,625 

1,043 

860 

1,156 

2,179 

950 

3,070 

1,646 

666 

417 

5,190 

3,224 

1,328 

841 

654 

1,331 

2,824 

1,981 

777 

1,086 

4,612 

7,543 

1,823 

654 

1,850 

606 

2,979 

569 

3,472 

1,572 

913 

734 

4,292 

1,596 

2,480 

3,417 

1,775 

574 

827 

1,043 

5,565 

769 

1,725 

41,472 

804 

797 

715 

2,419 

3,491 

8,453 

831 






2,794 


Grand Falls 


Thetford Mines 


1,913 




Trois-Rivieres 


5,464 




Val d'Or 


1,530 


Prince Edward Island 


Valley field 


2,617 


Charlottetown 




2,304 
2,618 


Summerside 




Nova Scotia 


Ontario 






188,875 






461 


Halifax 




1,408 




Belleville 


2,068 


Kentville 


Bracebridge 


1,431 






1,380 






3,213 




Brockville 


706 




Carleton Place 


333 






2,541 


Truro 


Cobourg 


1,117 




Collingwood 


1,063 






3,659 




Elliot Lake 


638 




Fort Erie 


750 




Fort Frances 


785 




Fort William 


2,922 




Gait 


1,594 




Gananoque 


460 






777 




Guelph 


2,110 






13,819 


St. Stephen 


Hawkesbury 


947 






892 






1,126 






2,485 






1,502 






3,375 






910 






784 






515 






4,288 






3,656 




Midland 


1,477 






857 




New Liskeard< 3 > 


— 






1,369 






3,030 




North Bay 


1,815 






876 




Orillia 


1,108 






4,611 


Hull 




6,794 






1,919 






757 






1,992 




Perth 


668 






3,537 






572 






4,757 






1,132 






978 






598 






4,903 




St. Thomas 


1,259 






2,960 






3,137 






1,432 


Port Alfred 


Sioux Lookout see footnote 4 ) 

Smiths Falls 


255 




552 






896 






1,086 






3,826 






419 






2,286 






43,579 


Ste. Therese 




838 






1,101 






919 




Welland 


2,630 


Sept-Iles 




3,725 


Sherbrooke 




9,512 


Woodstock 


998 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 



181 



TABLE D-5— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, AT 

DECEMBER 31, 1962 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


(i) 

Dec. 31 

1962 


Previous 

Year 

Dec. 29 

1961 


(i) 

Dec. 31 

1962 


Previous 

Year 

Dec. 29 

1961 


Manitoba 


29,148 

2,626 
1,831 

198 
1,327 

509 
22,657 

21,002 

457 
474 
1,600 
1,394 
3,004 
4,902 
4,764 
1,009 
484 
2,914 

32,040 

495 

10,484 

561 

13,235 

492 

861 

3,085 

1,575 

1,252 


30,269 

2,826 
1,987 

248 
1,530 

423 
23,255 

22,949 

537 
606 
1,813 
1,406 
2,750 
5,613 
5,120 
1,273 
630 
3,201 

33,790 

547 

10,005 

584 

14,739 

480 

881 

3,323 

1,628 

1,603 


British Columbia 


68,526 

2,431 
1,559 
1,306 
1,247 
1,270 
1,531 
1,401 

179 
1,352 
1,556 
1,030 
9,709 
1,665 

762 
2,494 
1,853 

529 

810 

1,006 

28,546 

1,950 

3,683 

657 

611,004 

473,575 
137,429 


71,284 






2,670 






1,731 


Flin Flon . 




1 026 






998 


The Pas . 




1,264 






1,636 






1,911 


Saskatchewan 




213 






1,683 






1,385 






1,279 


North Battleford 




10,652 






1,907 






770 






1,716 






1,688 






716 






970 




Trail 


1,112 


Alberta 




28,976 






2,453 






3,956 






572 




CANADA 




Edson 


615,036 










478 470 










136,566 









(^Preliminary subject to revision. 

^Includes 897 registrations reported by the Magdalen Islands Local office. 
tt'Prior to May 1962, figures included with Kirkland Lake local office. 
(^Winnipeg includes Sioux Lookout as of November 1, 1962. 



182 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment insurance statistics are concerned with numbers of persons covered by 
insurance and claimants for benefit at Unemployment Insurance Commission local 
offices. The data are compiled in the Unemployment Insurance Section, D.B.S. from 
information supplied by the UIC. For further information regarding the nature of the 
data see Technical Note, page 1432, December 1962 issue. 

TABLE E-l— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



End of: 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants 


1962— October 


4,040,000 
3,977,000 
3,995,000 
3,976,000 
3,954,000 
3,889,000 
4,064,000 
4,144,000 
4,161,000 
4,158,000 

4,139,000 
4,023,000 
3,940,000 


3,795,900 
3,779,200 
3,796,300 
3,764,000 
3,739,700 
3,625,100 
3,499,500 
3,456,500 
3,442,300 
3,459,500 

3,537,800 
3,637,000 
3,671,300 


244,100 




197,800 




198,700 


July 


212,000 




214,300 




263,900 




564,500 




687,500 




718,700 




698,500 


1961 — December 


601,200 




386,000 




268,700 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



183 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 

NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, 

AND PERCENTAGE POSTAL, NOVEMBER 30, 1962 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S 



Province and Sex 



Total 
Claimants 



Number of weeks on claim 
(based on 20 per cent sample) 



2 or 



6-8 



9-12 



13-16 



17-20 



Over 
20 



Percent- 
age 
Postal 



Novem- 
ber 
30, 1961 
Total 
claimants 



Canada 

Male 

Female 

Newfoundland 

Male 

Female 

Prince Edward Island 

Male 

Female 

Nova Scotia 

Male 

Female 

New Brunswick 

Male 

Female 

Quebec 

Male 

Female 

Ontario 

Male 

Female 

Manitoba 

Male 

Female 

Saskatchewan 

Male 

Female 

Alberta 

Male 

Female 

British Columbia 

Male 

Female 



374,191 

274,881 

99,310 



180,702 
142,869 
37,833 



50,585 
39,099 
11,486 



55,354 
40,198 
15,156 



29,112 
18,240 
10,872 



16,526 
9,892 
6,634 



10,350 
5,789 
4,561 



31,562 
18,794 
12,768 



34.8 
37.0 
28.6 



385,964 

286,374 

99,590 



14,032 

12,720 

1,312 

2,504 

1,914 

590 

19,320 
15,998 
3,322 

17,990 
14,269 
3,721 

111,469 
82,014 
29,455 

109,821 
74,468 
35,353 

18,705 
14,190 
4,515 

11,641 
8,813 
2,828 

22,393 
16,474 
5,919 

46,316 
34,021 
12,295 



7,268 

6,873 

395 



1,225 
357 

8,610 
7,382 
1,228 

9,354 
7,564 
1,790 

52,759 
41,558 
11,201 

51,644 
38,302 
13,342 

9,541 
7,763 
1,778 

6,291 
5,429 



11,798 
9,669 
2,129 

21,855 
17,104 
4,751 



2,093 

1,951 

142 



229 
57 

2,349 

1,934 

415 

2,410 

2,030 

380 

16,139 
12,548 
3,591 

13,969 
9,925 
4,044 

2,861 

2,320 

541 

1,541 

1,296 

245 

2,930 

2,288 

642 

6,007 
4,578 
1,429 



1,864 

1,708 

156 

283 

208 

75 

2,762 

2,348 

414 

2,335 

1,820 

515 

16,274 
11,792 
4,482 

17,386 
11,861 
5,525 

2,605 

1,809 

796 

1,536 
990 
546 



3,124 
2,237 

887 

7,185 
5,425 
1,760 



844 
692 
152 

137 
103 
34 

1,661 

1,270 

391 

1,239 



8,851 
5,978 
2,873 

8,800 
4,859 
3,941 

1,217 
786 
431 

741 
349 
392 



714 
892 

4,016 
2,561 
1,455 



491 
388 
103 

63 
43 
20 

1,125 
852 
273 

783 

587 



4,929 
3,073 
1,856 

4,860 
2,530 
2,330 

705 
367 



392 
165 
227 

934 
451 
483 

2,244 
1,436 



356 

265 

91 



522 
392 
130 

436 
303 
133 

3,318 
1,788 
1,530 

2,956 
1,487 
1,469 

409 
244 
165 

258 

127 
131 

552 

276 
276 

1,514 

887 
627 



1,116 
843 
273 

124 
' 86 



2,291 

1,820 

471 

1,433 

1,037 

396 

9,199 
5,277 
3,922 

10,206 
5,504 

4,702 

1,367 
901 



882 
457 
425 

1,449 
839 
610 

3,495 
2,030 
1,465 



74.6 
75.9 
62.0 

71.1 
73.5 
63.6 

47.6 
48.7 
42.3 

59.8 
60.9 
55.6 

30.0 
31.3 
26.3 

24.9 
25.2 
24.3 

27.2 
30.3 
17.3 

48.8 
52.2 
38.4 

60.0 
64.6 
47.4 

28.0 
30.3 
21.7 



13,810 

12,647 

1,163 

1,850 

1,357 

493 

18,546 
15,203 
3,343 

14,962 
11,436 
3,526 

107,561 
77,910 
29,651 

121,689 
86,773 
34,916 

18,497 
13,989 
4,508 

13,790 
10,759 
3,031 

22,738 
16,968 
5,770 

52,521 
39,332 
13,189 



Note: Values less than 50 subject to relatively large sampling variability. 



184 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT, BY PROVINCE, 

NOVEMBER 1962 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending 
at End of Month 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




9,599 
1,990 
10,891 
11,913 
70,944 
71,210 
13,675 
8,533 
14,846 
29,962 


7,863 

1,664 

8,115 

9,091 

50,344 

49,987 

10,110 

6,621 

10,345 

21,532 


1,736 

326 

2,776 

2,822 

20,600 

21,223 

3,565 

1,912 

4,501 

8,430 


5,728 

1,090 

8,277 

9,059 

57,810 

59,723 

9,503 

5,644 

12,230 

25,196 


4,465 

878 

6,344 

7,329 

45,522 

45,421 

7,452 

4,395 

9,513 

18,569 


1,263 

212 

1,933 

1,730 

12,288 

14,302 

2,051 

1,249 

2,617 

6,627 


5,221 




1.050 




4,625 




4,822 




28,343 




27,374 




6,004 




4,267 




7,020 


British Columbia (inch Yukon Territory) . 


10,744 


Total, Canada, November 1962 

Total, Canada, October 1962 


243,563 
150,444 
252,551 


175,672 
95,524 
178,400 


67,891 
54,920 
74,151 


194,160 
131,265 
212.546 


149,888 
91,890 
159,464 


44,272 
39,375 
53,082 


99,470 
50,067 


Total, Canada, November 1961 


87,889 



*In addition, revised claims received numbered 35,639. 

tin addition, 35,517 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 3,615 were special requests not granted and 2,353 
appeals by claimants. There were 8,943 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



TABLE E-4— BENEFIT PAYMENTS, BY PROVINCE, NOVEMBER 1962 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Weeks 
Paid* 


Amount of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 


Newfoundland 


23,546 

3,244 

40,216 

35,754 

236,735 

256,303 

38,581 

20,812 

43,017 

95,713 


554,733 


Prince Edward Island 


67,271 


Nova Scotia 


895,052 


New Brunswick * 


798,324 




5,654,041 




6,094,820 




921,087 




486,673 


Alberta 


1,045,647 


British Columbia (including Yukon Territory) 


2,416,025 






Total, Canada, November 1962 


793,921 
672,646 
881,230 


18,933,673 


Total, Canada, October 1962 


15,753,741 


Total, Canada, November 1961 


20,938,313 







'"Weeks paid" represents the total of complete and partial weeks of benefit paid during the month. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



185 



F — Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

1957 Weighted 

(1949-100) 

Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Total 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Transpor- 
tation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 


1959— Year 


127.2 

128.4 

129.2 

130.7 

129.8 

129.8 
129.7 
130.3 
130.1 
130.5 
131.0 
131.4 
131.0 
131.5 
131.9 
131.9 

132.0 


122.2 

122.6 

124.0 

126.2 

124.5 

125.0 
124.4 
125.8 
124.5 
125.6 
127.0 
128.4 
126.8 
127.2 
127.7 
127.8 

129.0 


131.5 

132.9 

133.2 

134.8 

133.8 

134.0 
134.0 
134.0 
134.5 
134.9 
135.1 
135.1 
135.2 
135.4 
135.6 
135.7 

135.9 


109.7 

111.0 

112.5 

113.5 

113.7 

111.8 
112.9 
113.2 
112.8 
113.1 
112.9 
112.7 
113.3 
115.6 
116.0 
115.8 

114.7 


140.5 

141.1 

140.6 

140.4 

141.1 

140.7 
139.9 
140.2 
140,4 
140.4 
140.7 
140.8 
140.3 
139.9 
140.6 
140.2 

139.8 


151.0 

154.8 

155.3 

158.3 

156.8 

157.2 
157.2 
158.1 
158.2 
158.2 
158.4 
158.2 
158.2 
160.0 
159.8 
159.8 

159.8 


144.4 

145.6 

146.1 

147.3 

146.3 

146.7 
146.7 
146.6 
147.1 
147.0 
147.8 
147.8 
147.6 
147.8 
148.2 
148.2 

148.6 


113.8 


1960— Year 


115.8 


1961— Year 


116.3 


1962— Year 


117.8 


1961 — December 


117.3 


1962 — February 


117.2 




117.5 


April 


117.9 




117.9 




117.9 


July 


117.9 




118.0 




118.0 




118.0 




117.8 




117.8 


1963 — January 


117.8 







TABLE F-2— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA AT 
THE BEGINNING OF DECEMBER 1962 

(1949 = 100) 





All-Items 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Trans- 
portation 


Health 

and 
Personal 

care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
reading 


Tobacco 




Dec. 
1961 


Nov. 
1962 


Dec. 

1962 


and 
Alcohol 


<>>St. John's, Nfld.. 


116.5 
129.5 
130.7 
130.9 
131.6 
131.9 
128.9 
126.1 
125.8 
130.1 


118.1 
130.9 
131.4 
132.0 
132.7 
133.2 
130.1 
128.0 
127.4 
130.6 


118.1 
130.8 
131.9 
132.3 
132.7 
133.0 
130.1 
128.3 
127.4 
130.6 


112.3 
122.3 
125.5 
133.5 
127.1 
125.7 
128.1 
125.2 
122.4 
127.6 


114.6 
134.4 
131.8 
134.8 
137.7 
139.7 
129.5 
127.4 
127.5 
134.8 


112.0 
125.8 
122.8 
108.6 
121.2 
120.7 
121.4 
128.1 
125.7 
118.9 


123.6 
139.6 
144.0 
160.8 
152.0 
132.0 
135.1 
136.9 
131.0 
138.4 


154.7 
163.2 
184.8 
169.0 
163.8 
156.0 
173.2 
144.8 
162.8 
150.3 


152.1 
164.8 
150.7 
143.8 
143.9 
185.1 
141.1 
148.2 
144.6 
146.2 


101.1 
124.5 




124.5 




118.7 




123.8 




121.8 




120.4 


Saskatoon-Regina. . 
Edmonton-Calgary 


119.5 
119.5 
121.0 







N.B. Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

("St. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



186 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



G — Strikes and Lockouts 

Statistical information on work stoppages in Canada is compiled by the Economics 
and Research Branch of the Department of Labour on the basis of reports from the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission. The first three tables in this section cover strikes and 
lockouts involving six or more workers and lasting at least one working day, and strikes 
and lockouts lasting less than one day or involving fewer than six workers but exceeding 
a total of nine man-days. The number of workers involved includes all workers reported 
on strike or locked out, whether or not they all belonged to the unions directly involved 
in the disputes leading to work stoppages. Workers indirectly affected, such as those laid 
off as a result of a work stoppage, are not included. For further notes on the series see 
page 103, January issue. 

TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1957-1962 





Month or Year 


Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 


Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 




Strikes and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in Man-Days 




Man- Days 


Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 


1957 


242 
253 
203 
268 
272 

13 

20 
15 
30 
18 
23 
27 
24 
35 
23 
21 
29 
13 


249 
262 
218 
274 

287 

40 

40 
44 
46 
40 
45 
53 
47 
54 
48 
42 
49 
29 


91,409 
112,397 
100, 127 
49,408 
97,959 

22,000 

9,174 
10,855 
12,426 
12,328 
17,333 
14,545 
16,775 
11,531 
10,482 
9,957 
9,565 
3,641 


1,634,880 
2,872,340 
2,286,900 
738,700 
1,335,080 

140,890 

85,420 

72,070 

143,800 

142,770 

139,700 

260,650 

133,650 

74,540 

116,350 

108,040 

76,740 

56,660 


0.14 


1958 


0.24 


1959 


0.19 


I960 


0.06 


1961 


0.11 


1961: 




0.13 


♦1962: 




0.08 






0.07 






0.14 






0,14 






0.12 






0.23 




July 


0.11 






0.07 






0.10 






0.10 






0.07 






0.05 









♦Preliminary. 



TABLE G-2— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
DECEMBER 1962, BY INDUSTRY 

, (Preliminary) 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
DECEMBER 1962, BY JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Days 




1 


38 


950 






Manufacturing 


16 
4 
2 
4 


3,269 
123 
32 
79 


52,200 




890 


Transpn. & utilities 

Trade 


530 
1,250 


Finance 




Service 








Public administration. . . 


2 


100 


840 


All industries 


29 


3,641 


56,660 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man- 
Days 




















1 


23 


50 








6 
14 


2,108 
969 


44,640 




8,570 
















7 


40 
501 


640 


British Columbia 


2,760 










All jurisdictions 


29 


3,641 


56,660 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1963 



187 



TABLE G-4- STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

DECEMBER 1962 

(Preliminary) 



Industry- 


Union 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in 
Man-Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Employer 
Location 


Decem- 
ber 


Accu- 
mulated 


Result 


Manufacturing 
Tobacco Products 
Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada 
Toronto, Ont. 

Rubber 

Dominion Rubber, 

Kitchener, Ont. 

Wood 

TahsisCo., 
Tahsis, B.C. 

Primary Metals 

Quebec Iron & Titanium, 

Tracy, Que. 

Transportation Equipment 
York Gears, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Chemical Products 
Shawinigan Chemicals, 
Shawinigan, Que. 


Tobacco Workers Loc. 319 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rubber Workers Loc. 80 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Woodworkers Loc. 1-85 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Metal Trades' Federation 
(CNTU) 

Auto Workers Loc. 984 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNTU-chartered local 


260 

131 
(235) 

300 

745 

242 

1,239 
(40) 


2,990 

330 

300 

18,630 

1,210 

24,780 


2,990 

330 

1,200 

86,360 

1,330 

124,810 


Dec. 5 
Dec. 20 

Dec. 14 
Dec. 19 

Nov. 28 
Dec. 4 

Aug. 28 

Nov. 30 
Dec. 10 

Aug. 17 


Wages, hours~8ff an hr. in- 
crease first yr., 4ji an hr. 
second yr.; reduction in 
weekly hours from 40-37$, 
other improved benefits. 

Disciplinary suspension of 
one worker ~ Return of work- 
ers. 

Discharge of one worker^ 
Return of workers. 

New agreement^ 

Wages, hours ~ Return of 
workers, further negotiations 

Management rights, job eval- 
uation, seniority rights^- 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



188 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7963 






THE 



LABOUR 
GAZETTE 



a* 



WORKING CONDITIONS 

IN MANUFACTURING, 

1962 (p. 197) 




COLLECTIVE BARGAINING SETTLEMENTS, p. 219 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 
Vol. LXIII No. 3 

MARCH 29, 1963 



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(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 



R. M. Dyke 



Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 



Circulation Manager 



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Cover Photograph 

National Film Board 

by Malak 



Vol. Mil, No. 3 CONTENTS March 29, 1963 

Advisory Councils and Committees 190 

50 Years Ago This Month 191 

Notes of Current Interest 192 

Working Conditions in Manufacturing, 1962 197 

Latest Labour Statistics 200 

Distribution of Union Membership in Canada, 1962 201 

National Advisory Committee on Technological Education 208 

45th Annual Meeting, Canadian Construction Association 211 

Employment and Unemployment, February 213 

Collective Bargaining Review: 

Duration of Negotiations, 1962 216 

Collective Bargaining Scene 217 

Upgrade U.S. Vocational Rehabilitation Office 221 

Survey of Unemployed Older Workers 222 

The Woman Worker, 1891 223 

Teamwork in Industry 224 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 225 

Conciliation Proceedings 227 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 231 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 232 

Recent Regulations, Federal and Provincial 235 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 239 

Monthly Report on Operations of the NES 240 

Decisions of the Umpire 241 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 244 

Prices and the Cost of Living 248 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 249 

LABOUR STATISTICS 254 



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64903-8-1 



Department of Labour Today 



Advisory Councils and Committees 



Six advisory bodies assist Minister of Labour and Department of Labour in many 
matters within their jurisdiction, and another reports through the Minister 



Six advisory bodies, on most of which 
labour has representation, assist the Minister 
of Labour and the Department of Labour 
in many matters within their jurisdiction: 
technical, vocational and apprenticeship 
training; technological education; and 
rehabilitation of disabled' persons. Another 
advisory committee reports to Parliament 
through the Minister. Three advisory com- 
mittees have been established under Acts 
of Parliament administered by the Depart- 
ment. One advisory body was set up as a 
subcommittee of one of these three. 

Two advisory committees were convened 
by the Department to advise on certain of 
its research activities. 

The National Technical and Vocational 
Training Advisory Council was established 
under the Technical and Vocational Train- 
ing Assistance Act passed in 1960, which 
replaced the 1942 Vocational Training Co- 
ordination Act. 

Consisting of 23 members appointed by 
the Governor in Council, with one mem- 
ber designated as chairman, the Council 
meets twice each year. Three of the present 
members represent employer organizations, 
and three represent employee organizations. 
Other members represent organizations of 
women, veterans, farmers, teachers and 
professional engineers, and provincial 
governments. 

The National Apprenticeship Training 
Advisory Committee, formed under the 
former Vocational Training Co-ordination 
Act, is composed of a chairman and 11 
members, representing the provinces, organ- 
ized labour and employers. 

This Committee advises on the drafting 
and administration of the federal-provincial 
Apprenticeship Training Agreement. 

Establishment of the National Advisory 
Committee on Technological Education was 
recommended by the First National Con- 
ference on Technological Education in 
Canada in May 1961 (L.G. 1961, p. 546). 
At its first meeting, the National Technical 
and Vocational Training Advisory Council 
acted on the recommendation and set the 
Committee up as a subcommittee of the 
Council. The Committee, which consists of 
a chairman and 11 members, met for the 
first time in June 1961. 

Its function is to advise on the develop- 
ment and co-ordination of interprovincial 



programs for educating technicians or 
technologists. 

The National Advisory Council on the 
Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons, estab- 
lished under the Vocational Rehabilitation 
of Disabled Persons Act, passed in 1961, 
replaced a Committee having the same title. 

The Council was appointed under the 
new Act to advise the Minister of Labour 
on matters relevant to the vocational 
rehabilitation of disabled persons. 

The Act provides that the Council shall 
have 25 members: one member from each of 
the 10 provinces, ten members chosen on 
the joint recommendation of the Minister 
of Labour and the Minister of National 
Health and Welfare, and four members 
representing the Departments of Labour, 
National Health and Welfare and Veterans 
Affairs, and the Unemployment Insurance 
Commission, and one member to be chair- 
man. 

The Advisory Committee on Professional 
Manpower was convened by the Depart- 
ment of Labour in February 1956 "to serve 
as a forum for the exchange of ideas and 
opinions on the subject of professional 
and scientific manpower in Canada, and 
to act as a consultative body" to assist the 
Department in its work in this field (L.G. 
1956, p. 391). 

Representatives on this Committee come 
from professional associations, educational 
groups, and government departments and 
agencies. 

The Advisory Committee on Technologi- 
cal Change was convened by the Depart- 
ment of Labour and met for the first time 
in November 1957 (L.G. 1957, p. 1420). 
Its function is to provide the Department 
with technical advice relative to its research 
on technological changes occurring in 
industry and their effects on manpower. 
The 20 members of this Committee represent 
labour, management and government, with 
one of its members representing university 
interests. 

The Unemployment Insurance Advisory 
Committee was established under the 
Unemployment Insurance Act. The Com- 
mittee consists, in the words of the Act, "of 
a chairman and not less than six nor more 
than eight other members appointed by the 
Governor in Council to hold office during 
pleasure. 

(Continued on page 199) 



190 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



From the Labour Gazette, March 1913 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Report ot 1913 conciliation board in dispute between B.C. metalliferous mines 
and mineworkers over employees' demand tor 50-cent-a-day wage increase rejects 
claim. Minority report by union nominee says increase requested was moderate 



The report of a conciliation board 
appointed under the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act, 1907, to inquire into a 
dispute between various owners of metalli- 
ferous mines in eastern British Columbia 
and their employees, which was received 
by the Minister on February 4, 1913, was 
published in the Labour Gazette of March 
of that year. 

The majority report was signed by the 
chairman and the companies' nominee; a 
minority report was submitted by the miners' 
nominee. 

The point at issue in the dispute was a 
claim by the men, about 1,200 of whom 
were directly affected, for a wage increase 
of 50 cents a day. The majority report 
stated that this claim had been made on 
two grounds: first, that the cost of living 
had increased, while there had been little 
increase in wages; and, second, that the 
price of metals had increased during the 
previous year. 

The majority report dealt only with the 
contention that the cost of living had 
increased more than wages, and with the 
ability of the companies to pay the increase 
demanded. It did not directly refer to the 
increase in the price of metals as a ground 
for granting the men's demand. 

The report mentioned some of the points 
brought out at the hearings regarding the 
financial position of the men. The facts 
mentioned included the following: 

— The men demanded and obtained in 
both food and clothing the best of their 
kind, and this fact was more marked than 
it had been a few years before. 

— The boarding house at which 80 per 
cent of the workers, including some married 
men, lived and which was maintained by 
the mine-owners, made a flat charge of $1 
a day. This charge had remained constant 
throughout past years. 

—The secretary of one of the unions, a 
married man whose monthly pay cheque 
averaged $88, was not in debt, owned his 
own house and some other real estate, and 
some mining stock bought out of his earn- 
ings. He carried no insurance. 

— Another married man who boarded at 
the company's boarding house owned his 
own house in a nearby town, where his 
wife and four children lived for the sake 



of the children's education. He carried 
insurance and had a bank balance. 

— A single man, 26 years old, said that 
he was qualified as a miner, timber framer 
and timber framer's helper. He earned from 
$3 to $4 a day, and he stated that he could 
not live as he considered he ought to be 
able to live on this wage. He went on to 
say that seven months at a time was as 
long as a miner could stand the work, day 
in and day out. Therefore he would only 
work about seven months in the year. He 
thought that a miner ought to have $1,800 
a year to make life worth living, in other 
words a wage of $9 a day. 

— Another single man said that he could 
not live on his present wage. He admitted, 
however, that since he had come to British 
Columbia in 1895 he had, as the report 
put it, "put into the ground in mineral 
claims which he owned between $6,000 
and $7,000, including his own time, and 
that this came from his earnings as a 
miner." 

The majority report said that, although 
there might be some shyness or diffidence 
in coming forward, "if the claim for an 
increase had been deeprooted in the in- 
creased cost of living, witnesses would not 
have been lacking." 

Considering the evidence given by the 
men and the companies, the majority report 
stated that the opinion of the board was 
that "the present conditions in this district 
and in the mines concerned do not justify 
any increase in the scale of wages pre- 
vailing ... or any disturbance of the 
relations now existing between employees 
and employers . . ." 

The miners' representative, in his minor- 
ity report, dealt first with the claim to a 
wage increase based on the increase in the 
price of metals. He entirely rejected this 
as grounds for a wage claim, saying in 
part, "The worker selling his only com- 
modity (physical and mental energy) is 
subject to these inexorable economic laws, 
i.e., cost of production and the law of 
supply and demand; hence, the higher or 
lower price of metals is, in plain English, 
none of his business." 

His final conclusion was that if, as the 
evidence showed, the men's standard of liv- 
ing had fallen owing to the rise in prices, 
the increase asked for was a moderate one. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1963 

64903-S— 1J 



191 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Modify Terms for Federal Aid to School Construction 



A modification was announced last 
month in the arrangements for the federal 
Government's contribution toward provin- 
cial expenditures in respect to technical 
and vocational training construction proj- 
ects under the Technical and Vocational 
Training Assistance Act. The 75-per-cent 
federal contribution will now apply to that 
part of the construction carried out before 
October 1, 1963 on approved projects for 
which contracts have been awarded before 
April 1, 1963. 

This is similar to a provision made last 
fall covering the purchase and installation 
of equipment in technical and vocational 
schools. 

Before the modification, the federal con- 
tribution was scheduled to be reduced on 
April 1 from 75 to 50 per cent. 

The Minister of Labour said, when 
announcing the modification, that the main 
purpose of the contribution of 75 per cent 



during the initial period of the joint-federal- 
provincial agreement was to stimulate the 
development of much needed training 
facilities. In spite of their best efforts, some 
provinces have been unable to make as 
much progress in developing their new 
training facilities by March 31, 1963 as they 
planned and thus it is desirable to have 
the 75-per-cent federal contribution apply 
over a further six-month period. 

Up to mid-February, federal approval 
had been given for new construction on 
468 technical and vocational high schools, 
institutes of technology ' and trade schools 
across Canada. These facilities will provide 
accommodation for 130,000 students. 

The estimated cost of these projects, 
additions, alterations and equipment will be 
in excess of $457,000,000, of which the 
federal Government contribution totals 
$292,000,000. 



Technician in Science, Engineering 
Is Subject of New Monograph 

A new release in the "Canadian Occupa- 
tions" series of occupational monographs, 
Technicians in Science and Engineering, 
instead of being concerned with only one 
occupation, deals with a whole group of 
occupations, the scientific and engineering 
technician occupations. 

These occupations are similar in that they 
all require knowledge that cannot be picked 
up in the course of a normal day's work. 
They require a knowledge of physical 
sciences, engineering and mathematical sub- 
jects such as can be obtained by completion 
of a prescribed course of study at an insti- 
tute of technology, or its equivalent in part- 
time studies. 

"Scientists are reaching into the future 
to discover new laws and principles; 
engineers are applying those laws and prin- 
ciples to provide us with a myriad of goods 
and services which were unknown at the 
turn of the present century," the bulletin 
says. But the scientists and engineers require 
the assistance of "the services of many 
people with varied backgrounds and with 
many different kinds of skill, knowledge 
and experience." It is with this group that 
the new bulletin is concerned. 

The publication deals with the history 
and importance of these technicians, the 



nature of their work, their fields of work — 
i.e., electrical, mechanical, aeronautical, 
etc., — their preparation and training, their 
advancement and earnings, the organizations 
that represent them, their outlook for em- 
ployment, and the ways in which they may 
seek and find employment. 

The monograph is profusely illustrated 
with photographs of many scientific and 
engineering technicians at work. 



Appeals to Umpire Increase; 
255 Received during 1962 

The office of the Umpire, Unemployment 
Insurance Commission, received a total of 
255 appeals in 1962, compared with 174 
in 1961. In addition, 50 appeals were car- 
ried over from 1961, compared with a 
carry-over of 43 appeals from 1960 to 
1961. 

Appeals disposed of during the year num- 
bered 237, leaving 68 pending on Decem- 
ber 31, 1962. Appeals disposed of during 
1961 numbered 167; during 1960 there 
were 126. 

The Umpire signed 211 decisions in 1962, 
compared with 166 in 1961 and 121 in 1960. 

Most appeals concern benefit cases; only 
a few are coverage cases. Of the appeals 
in 1962, only 27 were coverage cases; 278 
were benefit cases. 



192 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



Hold Third Labour-Management-University Seminar at Saskatoon 



At the end of a two-day national labour- 
management seminar in Saskatoon at the 
end of January, labour and management 
leaders agreed on the urgent need to co- 
operate for the common good in solving 
economic and social problems confronting 
Canada. 

More than 100 delegates representing 
labour, management, government, education 
and agriculture met under the sponsorship 
of the University of Saskatchewan, the 
Saskatchewan Productivity Council and the 
National Productivity Council. 

The first and second seminars were con- 
ducted at Kingston in March 1962 and 
Halifax in September 1962. The Saskatoon 
seminar was followed at the same location 
on January 25 by the 11th regular meeting 
of the NPC. 

The meeting recommended that "con- 
tinuing labour - management - government - 
university conferences be held, the partici- 
pants to be from top levels of each field and 
the body to be constituted on a formalized 
basis." 

The proposed body should have "the 
objective of identifying — and agreeing upon 
— common problems that appear to be ca- 
pable of solution by co-operative efforts." 

Another recommendation adopted by the 
delegates declared that "a change in atti- 
tude is required in order that a better spirit 
of trust and co-operation between labour 
and management be created." 

The seminar recommended that, "to over- 
come prejudicial attitudes of management 
and labour toward each other, both groups 
consider it a necessity that top level meet- 
ings, such as this seminar, must continue in 
order to overcome the two great fallacies of 
labour-management philosophy: that man- 
agement does not believe in employee 
security and that labour does not believe in 
the profit system." 

The meeting recommended also that the 
National Productivity Council provide a wide 
distribution of the report of last year's mis- 
sion to Europe (L.G., Nov. 1962, p. 1261) 
so that it might be used as study material 
for labour and management groups, and 
that the Council consider providing speakers 
to aid in the dissemination of the report's 
contents. 

A final resolution urged the NPC to 
"explore the feasibility of developing dis- 
cussion at the national level by groups fully 
representative of employees and employers 
and with adequate regional representation 
of each." 

At the seminar, Dr. A. E. Safarian, Head 
of the Economic and Political Science 



Department, University of Saskatchewan, 
told the participants that the challenge to 
the Canadian economy in the next decade 
would be to compete in world markets. 
Speaking on "The Economic Facts in 
Canada Today," he asserted that major 
organizational changes and more specializa- 
tion in product lines within the context 
of full employment were required to generate 
greater demand in domestic and foreign 
markets. 

Three major sources of economic 
growth, requiring greater emphasis in 
Canada, were defined by Dr. Safarian as 
education and training, the advance and 
application of technological and organiza- 
tional knowledge, and the growing size of 
markets. He suggested that increases in 
the size of the labour force and capital in- 
vestment may have been over-emphasized in 
the past as economic growth factors. 

Canada had not yet fully recognized the 
role of increased productivity in achieving 
greater economic growth, he added. The 
key to raising productivity in secondary 
manufacturing industries was to increase 
the size of the market, he stressed. 

Labour leaders at the seminar expressed 
serious concern over current economic and 
social problems such as balance of pay- 
ments and unemployment. They stated that 
the Canadian labour movement remains 
ready to participate in high level labour- 
management-government joint consultation 
and co-operation projects provided eco- 
nomic planning for full employment is 
accepted. They also wanted recognition of 
trade unions as economic partners with 
freedom to organize a higher percentage 
of the labour force. 

Members on joint consultative bodies 
must officially represent central labour and 
management organizations to be effective, 
they emphasized, and such bodies should 
be recognized as advisors to the government 
on economic as well as productivity mat- 
ters. 

The seminar was told in a luncheon 
address by H. George De Young, Chairman 
of the National Productivity Council, that 
Canada's competitive ability could not be 
improved until a climate of co-operation 
and trust between management and labour 
had been established. 

Oakley Dalgleish, Editor and Publisher 
of the Globe and Mail, Toronto, guest 
dinner speaker, declared that management 
and labour must change their traditional 
attitudes toward each other at the local as 
well as the national level in order to achieve 
real labour-management co-operation. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



193 



Government Employees Report 
18,800 Work Injuries in 1961-62 

With a total of 228,000 employees 
covered by the Government Employees 
Compensation Act during the fiscal year 
1961-62, the number of work injuries 
reported was 18,762, according to the 10th 
annual report of the Government Em- 
ployees Compensation Branch of the Depart- 
ment of Labour. Employees covered num- 
bered 3,000 more than in the previous 
year; injuries reported, 380 more. 

In other words, one employee in every 
13 had an accident of some kind. Of these 
injuries, however, 11,709 were minor. 

Compensation was paid in 2,870 cases, 
injury leave cases numbered 3,582, and 
566 claims were rejected. Permanent dis- 
abilities numbered 11, and fatalities, 24. The 
number of claims settled during the year 
was 18,010. 

The total cost of all compensation bene- 
fits paid was $2,468,192, an increase of 
5 per cent compared with the previous 
year. This sum does not include the amounts 
paid to the 10 provincial Workmen's Com- 
pensation Boards for their services under 
the Act, which totalled $290,100 during 
the year. A total of $489,770, however, 
was recovered from certain crown agencies. 

The total direct cost of accidents and 
injuries suffered by persons employed in 
the federal public service was $3,445,000. 
This amounts to a little more than $15 
per person for all employees covered by 
the Act. The total number of days lost was 
107,956, the equivalent of year-round 
employment for about 450 employees. 



Industrial Relations Conference 
Planned by B.C. Government 

The establishment of a planning commit- 
tee to organize the British Columbia Con- 
ference on Industrial Relations was 
announced last month. The holding of the 
conference, on June 26-28, was announced 
in the Speech from the Throne in the 
provincial Legislature. 

The planning committee consists of rep- 
resentatives of trade unions, employers 
organizations, the University of British 
Columbia, and the provincial Department 
of Labour. Dr. J. T. Montague, formerly 
of the federal Department of Labour, and 
now Director of the Industrial Relations 
Institute of the University of British Colum- 
bia, is one of the members of the planning 
committee. 

Hon. L. R. Peterson, Minister of Labour 
for British Columbia, said in speaking 
before the Legislature on the subject that 



the purpose of the conference was to bring 
together representatives of management 
and labour to discuss their common prob- 
lems in collective bargaining at a time other 
than during such bargaining, and to hear 
the views of speakers who have a special 
knowledge of the subject. 

The purpose and objectives of the con- 
ference will be: (1) To identify the 
objectives of collective bargaining; (2) To 
identify areas of co-operation between 
government, labour, and industry with 
respect to industrial relations in British 
Columbia; and (3) To identify possible 
studies and co-operative programs. 

Representatives of trade unions, em- 
ployers, employers' organizations, and other 
interested parties are being invited to 
attend. 

Other members of the planning commit- 
tee are: R. B. McDonell, representing the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, (B.C. 
Division); E. P. O'Neal, representing the 
British Columbia Federation of Labour; 
R. K. Gervin, representing the Vancouver 
Builders Exchange; H. F. Taft, represent- 
ing the Vancouver and New Westminster 
and District Building and Construction 
Trades Council; John Billings, represent- 
ing Forest Industrial Relations Limited; 
and F. Fieber, representing the Inter- 
national Woodworkers of America. 



Current Reports on Progress 
Of Labour Bills Now Available 

Seven of the provincial Legislatures were 
in session on February 20, and the re- 
mainder were expected to open shortly. 
The Speeches from the Throne indicated 
that a number of bills of interest to labour 
would be introduced. 

The Ontario Speech from the Throne 
stated that the House would be asked to 
pass the Ontario Portable Pensions Bill and 
to amend safety legislation, including The 
Construction Hoists Act, The Construction 
Safety Act and The Boilers and Pressure 
Vessels Act. The Labour Relations Act is 
to be amended and legislation to give civil 
servants bargaining rights and to establish 
a Civil Service Arbitration Board is to be 
introduced. 

The Quebec Speech from the Throne 
indicated that amendments to the labour 
relations legislation and to the Workmen's 
Compensation Act would be introduced. 

In British Columbia, the Minister of 
Labour, in an address during the debate 
on the Speech from the Throne, stated that 
amendments to the Labour Relations Act 
would be introduced, which would "enable 
grievances to be settled more expeditiously 



194 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



than previously at very little cost to the 
parties involved." 

The Department's Legislation Branch has 
issued the first of the 1963 series of mimeo- 
graphed reports on the labour bills and 
other bills of general labour interest that 
have been introduced. 

The reports cover the provisions of each 
bill and follow its progress from the time 
the bill is introduced to the point where 
it receives Royal Assent or is dropped. 
These current reports are intended to pro- 
vide more up-to-date information than it is 
possible to give in the monthly issues of 
the Labour Gazette. At the close of the 
sessions the major developments of the 
year will be reported in the Labour Law 
section of the Labour Gazette. 

Single copies of these reports are avail- 
able from the Legislation Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour, Ottawa. 



Old Age Assistance Recipients 
Increase in Fourth Quarter 

The number of persons receiving old age 
assistance in Canada, and the number receiv- 
ing blind persons' allowances increased in 
the fourth quarter of 1962, the Department 
of National Health and Welfare reports. 
The number receiving disabled persons' 
allowances decreased. 

Federal expenditures during the quarter 
increased for old age assistance and blind 
persons' allowances but decreased for dis- 
abled persons' allowances. 

Old Age Assistance — The number of per- 
sons receiving old age assistance in Canada 
increased from 102,030 at September 30 
to 103,032 at December 31, 1962. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$9,'522,575.23 for the quarter, compared 
with $9,476,499.25 in the preceding quarter. 
Since the inception of the Act, the federal 
Government has contributed $279,661,- 
570.97. 

At December 31, 1962, the average 
monthly assistance in the provinces ranged 
from $58.97 to $63.10. In all provinces 
and the Territories, the maximum assistance 
paid was $65 a month. 

Blind Persons' Allowances — The number 
of blind persons in Canada receiving allow- 
ances under the Blind Persons Act increased 
from 8,554 at September 30 to 8,611 at 
December 31, 1962. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$1,217,688.81 for the quarter, compared 
with $1,212,406.63 in the preceding quarter. 
Since the inception of the Act, the federal 
Government has contributed $39,350,338.12. 



At December 31, 1962, the average 
monthly allowance in the provinces ranged 
from $58.96 to $63.97. In all provinces 
and the Territories, the maximum allow- 
ance paid was $65 a month. 

Disabled Persons' Allowances — The num- 
ber of persons in Canada receiving allow- 
ances under the Disabled Persons Act de- 
creased from 50,493 at September 30 to 
50,423 at December 31, 1962. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$4,865,570.91 for the quarter, compared 
with $4,891,247.80 in the preceding quarter. 
Since the inception of the Act, the federal 
Government has contributed $103,301,- 
165.68. 

At December 31, 1962, the average 
monthly allowance in the provinces ranged 
from $63.59 to $64.66. In all provinces 
and the Territories, the maximum allowance 
paid was $65 a month. 



U.S. Department of Labor 
Marks 50th Anniversary 

The United States Department of Labor 
on March 4 celebrated the 50th anniversary 
of its founding in a day of ceremonies that 
culminated in a dinner attended by Presi- 
dent Kennedy. 

Three former Secretaries of Labor took 
part in the festivities: Frances Perkins, 
James P. Mitchell and Arthur J. Goldberg. 

One of the events of the day was the 
opening of a new permanent exhibit hall 
in the courtyard of the Department of 
Labor building. This exhibit consists of 
pictures, historical objects, and records 
illustrating the history of the labour move- 
ment and the Labor Department. 

The law that established the Department 
was signed by President William Taft on 
March 4, 1913, the day on which President 
Woodrow Wilson was inaugurated. For a 
number of years the Department remained 
a collection of practically autonomous 
bureaus under one roof. Only during the 
past decade, under Secretaries Mitchell, 
Goldberg, and W. Willard Wirtz, has it 
developed into a centralized, cohesive unit. 

The process of reorganizing the Depart- 
ment, however, began under Secretary 
Maurice J. Tobin. It was accelerated under 
Mr. Mitchell, and has been continued under 
Mr. Goldberg and Mr. Wirtz. 

The Manpower Development and Training 
Act of 1962 marked an important step in the 
progress of the Department, enabling it to 
combine its efforts with those of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare in 
establishing training programs designed to 
train unemployed workers for new jobs. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1963 



195 



Plumbers' John W. Bruce Retires 
After 52 Years as Organizer 




— Bill Rose, Winnipeg Free Press 

John W. Bruce, O.B.E., a general or- 
ganizer in Canada for the United Associa- 
tion of Journeymen and Apprentices of the 
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the 
United States and Canada (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
for more than 52 years, retired in late 
January. 

Mr. Bruce, now in his 88th year, was 
first elected a general organizer of the 
Plumbers in 1910. He was re-elected at all 
subsequent conventions. 

The labour leader was born in Mel- 
bourne, Australia, and began his union 
career when he was initiated into Local 
46 of the union in Toronto in 1906. 

John W. Bruce was a delegate to every 
convention of the Trades and Labour Con- 
gress of Canada for almost 50 years. During 
the Second World War he served on the 
Advisory Committee on Industrial Hygiene; 
he served five consecutive terms as labour 
representative on the Dominion Council of 
Health. 

In 1945 he was nominated by the TLC 
as a labour representative on the postwar 
Committee on Reconstruction and Rehabili- 
tation, and was appointed chairman of the 
Committee. 

On King George VI's Honours List on 
July 1, 1946, Mr. Bruce was made an 
Officer of the Order of the British Empire 
(O.B.E.). 



In Parliament Last Month 

(page numbers refer to Hansard) 

On January 29, during consideration in 
committee of Bill C-87, to provide for the 
establishment of a national economic 
development board, the House passed an 
amendment to the bill, moved by a private 
member, that required "consultation with 
the principal organizations representive of 
trade unions, farmers and other groups as 
the Governor in Council may determine" 
before appointments to the board were made 
(p. 3225 and 3241). 

On January 30, Bill C-110, to amend 
the Unemployment Insurance Act to bring 
employees in agriculture under the pro- 
visions of the Act was introduced by a 
private member and read the first time 
(p. 3251). The 1962-63 estimates of the 
Department of Labour were introduced by 
the Minister of Labour, and considered in 
committee of supply (3266). 

On February 1, Bill C-23, to amend the 
Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act to establish a new system of 
negotiation and conciliation under the Act 
(L.G., Nov. 1962, p. 1240) was withdrawn 
(p. 3366). 

On February 4, the Leader of the Opposi- 
tion moved a non-confidence motion (p. 
3409). Later, R. N. Thompson (Red Deer), 
leader of the Social Credit party, moved an 
amendment to the amendment, which also 
expressed non-confidence in the Govern- 
ment (p. 3414). 

February 5, after further long debate, the 
amendment to the amendment was passed 
on division by 142 votes to 111. Then, the 
amendment as amended was passed by the 
same majority (p. 3462). The Prime Minis- 
ter thereupon announced his intention of 
advising His Excellency the Governor 
General the next day and the House 
adjourned. The 25th Parliament was dis- 
solved on February 6. 

At dissolution, the following bills of 
labour interest had not passed second read- 
ing: Bill C-25, to amend the Merchant 
Seamen Compensation Act; Bill C-26, to 
amend the Railway Act (responsibility for 
dislocation costs); Bill C-43, to amend the 
Canada Fair Employment Practices Act 
(age discrimination); Bill C-61, to amend 
the Annual Vacations Act; Bill C-70, to 
provide for the safety of persons employed 
(federal works); Bill C-83, respecting indus- 
trial change and manpower adjustment; Bill 
C-85, to limit the hours of work for em- 
ployees (federal works); Bill C-87, to pro- 
vide for the establishment of a National 
Economic Development Board; Bill C-89, 
to amend the Criminal Code (peaceful 
picketing). 



196 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



Working Conditions in Manufacturing, 1962 

Proportion of plant workers in Canadian industry who are eligible for four-week 
vacation with pay has risen from 26 per cent in 1959 to 36 per cent in 1 962; 
of office employees, proportion rises from 32 to 47 per cent over same period 



The proportion of plant workers in the 
Canadian manufacturing industry who are 
in establishments granting a four-week vaca- 
tion with pay has risen from 26 per cent 
in 1959 to 36 per cent in 1962. The propor- 
tion in establishments granting a three- 
week vacation increased from 71 to 73 
per cent. 

Over the same period, the proportion of 
office employees eligible for a four-week 
vacation with pay rose from 32 to 47 per 
cent, and for a three-week paid vacation, 
from 82 to 84 per cent. 



And the greatest proportion of both plant 
and office workers required a shorter period 
of service in 1962 than in 1959 to qualify 
for the longer vacation. In 1959, for a 
three-week vacation, 47 per cent of plant 
workers had to have 15 years service; in 
1962, only 34 per cent required this length 
of service and almost the same proportion, 
35 per cent, required service of less than 
15 years. Of office employees, 49 per cent 
in 1959 had to serve 15 years for a three- 
week vacation; last year only 31 per cent 
did, and 50 per cent required less than 15 
years service for a vacation of that length. 



TABLE 1 



SUMMARY OF SELECTED WORKING CONDITIONS OF PLANT 
EMPLOYEES IN CANADIAN MANUFACTURING 



Standard Weekly Hours 

40 and under 

Over 40 and under 44 

44 

45 

Over 45 and under 48 

48 

Over 48 

Employees on a 5-day week 

Vacations with Pay 

Two weeks 

After: 1 year or less 

2 years 

3 years 

5 years 

Other periods 

Three weeks 

After: Less than 10 years 

10 years 

11-14 years 

15 years 

20 years 

Other periods 

Four weeks 

After: 25 years 

Other periods 

Vacations which do not vary with length of service 

One week 

Two weeks 

Paid Statutory Holidays 

1 to 5 

" 6 

7 

8 

9 

More than 9 

Number not stated 



Percentage of Plant Employees 



1962 


1961 


1.960 


1959 


% 


% 


% 


% 


72 


72 


70 


70 


8 


8 


10 


9 


4 


4 


4 


5 


8 


8 


8 


8 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


90 


90 


90 


89 


88(D 


88(i) 


86(D 


94d) 


24 


23 


20 


23 


12 


13 


14 


14 


26 


26 


26 


28 


23 


23 


24 


26 


3 


3 


2 


3 


73 


72 


72 


71 


7 


7 


6 


5 


21 


19 


11 


8 


7 


6 


4 


4 


34 


35 


45 


47 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 


3 


4 


4 


36 


33 


31 


26 


25 


27 


25 


22 


11 


6 


6 


4 


lid) 


lid) 


12(D 


(D 


5 


5 


5 


— 


5 


6 


7 


— 


95 


96 


96 


95 


8 


9 


10 


10 


5 


6 


5 


7 


8 


8 


8 


9 


52 


53 


53 


52 


18 


16 


15 


14 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


— 



(Din the questionnaires used in the surveys for 1959 and previous years, no distinction was made between vacation 
policies which provided for increasing vacation periods as service increased and vacation policies which provided for 
vacations of one stated period, regardless of length of service. In 1960, 1961 and 1962 this variation of policy was pro- 
vided for in the survey questionnaire. In comparing the statistics on vacations for 1960, 1961 and 1962 with those of 
previous years, the percentages of employees shown as being granted vacations under either of these two policy 
types must be added together. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

64803-8—2 



MARCH 7963 



197 



These were the most pronounced changes 
evident in a tabulation of returns to the 
Department's annual survey of working 
conditions. The information obtained in the 
survey, for other industries as well as 
manufacturing, has just been published in 
Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 
1962 (see box). Nearly 20,000 establish- 
ments employing 2,031,000 were surveyed. 

Changes in other working conditions were 
negligible. The proportion of plant workers 
with a scheduled work week of 40 hours 
and under has been 72 per cent for the 
past two years, and the proportion on a 
five-day week has been 90 per cent for the 
past three. For office employees, the propor- 
tion on a scheduled work week under 37± 
hours has risen in the past year to 29 per 
cent from 27 per cent, and on a five-day 
week, from 96 to 97 per cent. 

The percentage of workers employed in 
establishments where a four-week paid vaca- 
tion is allowed has increased markedly in 
each recent year. Among plant workers, 
the percentage increased from 26 in 1959 
to 31 in 1960, to 33 per cent in 1961, and 
to 36 per cent in 1962. Among office 



workers, the percentages rose from 32 in 
1959, to 37 in 1960, to 41 in 1961, and 
to 47 in 1962. 

Summaries of selected working conditions 
in manufacturing in the years 1959 to 
1962, for plant and office workers respec- 
tively, are given in the accompanying tables. 
The percentages given in the tables are 
the proportions that employees of estab- 
lishments reporting certain items bear to 
the total number of employees in all manu- 
facturing establishments that replied to 
the survey questionnaire. They are not 
necessarily the proportions of employees 
actually affected by the various provisions. 

Plant Workers 

A work week of 40 hours continued to 
be the standard for 72 per cent of plant 
workers in 1962. This was the same per- 
centage as in 1961, and only 2 per cent 
more than in 1960 and 1959. Employees 
on a five-day week amounted to 90 per 
cent of all plant workers in 1962, for the 
third year in succession. This was only 
1 per cent more than in 1959. 



TABLE 2— SUMMARY OF SELECTED WORKING CONDITIONS OF OFFICE 
EMPLOYEES IN CANADIAN MANUFACTURING 





Percentage of Office Employees 




1962 


1961 


1960 


1959 


Standard Weekly Hours 

Under 37* 


% 

29 
42 

7 
19 

3 

97 

92(0 
85 

5 

1 

1 

84 

8 
33 

9 
31 

2 

1 

47 
31 
16 

7(D 

1 

6 

99 

4 

7 

58 
24 

5 

1 


% 

27 
43 

8 
18 

4 

96 

9KD 

82 

7 
1 
1 

83 

7 
28 

7 
38 

2 

41 
31 
10 

7(D 

1 

6 

99 
5 

6 
58 
23 

6 

1 


% 

27 
43 

8 

18 
4 

95 

90(D 
79 

7 

1 

2 

1 

83 

7 
22 

4 
46 

2 

2 

37 

28 

9 

10(D 
1 
9 

99 

4 

60 
22 

5 

1 


% 
27 


37* 


42 




9 


40 


18 


Over 40 


4 




95 


Vacations with Pay 


98») 




89 




6 




2 




1 








82 




6 




17 




6 




49 




2 




2 




32 




25 




7 




(i) 










Paid Statutory Holidays 


99 


1 to 6 


5 


7 


8 


8 


58 


9 


23 


More than 9 


5 











<DSee Table 1, footnote <«. 



198 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1962 



Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 
1962 has just been issued by the Labour- 
Management Division of the Economics and 
Research Branch, Department of Labour. 
The 137-page report contains information 
on such working conditions as the standard 
work week, vacations with pay, paid statu- 
tory holidays, retirement policy, industrial 
medical services, health benefit plans, and 
the proportion of employees covered by 
collective agreements. 

The industries covered are: manufactur- 
ing, mining, land and air transportation, 
storage, public utilities and communications, 
municipal public works, hotels, restaurants 
and insurance. 



The data, for both non-office and office 
employees, are presented by industry. The 
data for the manufacturing industry are 
presented by province and by Canada totals. 

The report draws together in tabular 
form the information obtained from the 
Department's annual survey of working 
conditions that was conducted on May 1, 
1962. The statistical tables summarize the 
information received from nearly 20,000 
employing establishments. Of the 2,031,000 
workers employed by these establishments, 
593,000 were classified as office workers and 
1,438,000 as plant or non-office workers. 

The report, in English and in French 
editions, is available from the Queen's 
Printer, Ottawa, at 35 cents a copy. 



Except for the increase in the number 
of employees in establishments where a 
four-week vacation was possible, which has 
already been noted, there was little change 
in the provisions concerning vacations with 
pay. Two-week vacations were given in 
plants employing 88 per cent of the work- 
ers in 1962 and 1961. In 1960 the per- 
centage was 86 — a substantial drop from 
1959, when the percentage was 94. 

Three-week vacations were attainable in 
1962 in plants employing 73 per cent of 
all employees. Percentages in previous years 
were 72 in 1961 and 1960, and 71 in 1959. 

There was little change during the four 
years in the provisions regarding the num- 
ber of paid holidays allowed, except for 
an increase in the percentage of employees 
working in plants where nine statutory 
holidays a year were allowed. The per- 
centage of employees in these plants in- 
creased steadily from 14 in 1959 to 18 
in 1962. 

Offide Employees 

The prevailing work week for a large 
percentage of office workers continues to 
be one of 371 hours or less, but between 



1959 and 1962 there was little change in 
the percentage of workers affected: it in- 
creased by only 2 per cent from 69 in 
1959 to 71 in 1962. This increase was 
entirely confined to those who worked less 
than 37i hours. 

Provisions for vacations with pay of two 
or three weeks followed almost the same 
pattern for office employees as for plant 
workers, although the percentages of em- 
ployees affected was higher for all lengths 
of vacation for office than for plant work- 
ers. The increases in the proportion of 
office workers who may become eligible for 
a three- or four-week vacation has already 
been mentioned. 

In all of the four years under review, 
less than 5 per cent of the office workers 
were employed in establishments where 
fewer than six paid statutory holidays were 
allowed. Compared with plant workers, 
however, the increase in the proportion of 
office employees who are entitled to nine 
holidays a year has been insignificant, the 
24 per cent so entitled being only 1 per 
cent more than in 1959. There was little 
change in the proportion of office employees 
who get fewer than nine holidays a year. 



Department of Labour Today 

{Continued from page 190) 

"At least one of the members of the 
Advisory Committee, other than the chair- 
man, shall be appointed after consultation 
with organizations representative of workers 
and an equal number after consultation with 
organizations representative of employers." 

The duties of the Committee are to 
advise and assist the Unemployment Insur- 



ance Commission, to report on the condi- 
tion of the Unemployment Insurance Fund, 
and recommend amendments to the act if 
the Fund is, or is likely to become, insuf- 
ficient to discharge its liabilities, and also 
if the Fund is and is likely to continue to 
be "more than reasonably sufficient to dis- 
charge its liabilities." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 

64903-8— 2} 



199 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Altantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) . . 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000. 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



Date 



February 
February 
February 
February 
February 

February 
February 
February 

February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 

February 
February 

December 
December 

\ 1st. 9 mos. J 
J 1962 \ 



February 
February 
February 



December 
December 
December 
December 
February 

December 
December 



January 
January 
January 
January 



Amount 



6,496 
5,951 
532 
5,419 
4,942 

5,103 
683 
165. 

545 

87 

200 

135 

71 

52 

512 
33 

120.4 
111.1 

56,568 
28,506 



37 

7,002 

75,280 



$78.57 

$1.93 

37.5 

$72.53 
132.1 

131.6 
1,662 



NOT 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



0.0 

- 0.1 

- 1.1 
0.0 

- 0.1 

- 0.3 
+ 2.2 

- 3.5 



3.1 
3.1 



+ 54.2 
+ 53.6 

- 5.7 



+ 



3.6 
1.6 
9.0 
7.1 
0.1 

7.2 
3.0 



AVAI 



+ 1.1 

+ 1.9 

- 7.3 

+ 2.9 

+ 3.6 



1.8 
2.6 
3.8 

6.5 
7.5 
1.5 
16.2 
1.4 
1.9 

5.0 
25.0 

2.2 
3.0 

0.7 
2.3 



- 15.9 

- 35.5 
+ 4.5 



+ 1.9 

+ 2.7 

- 3.4 

- 0.4 
+ 1.8 

- 2.2 

+ 4.8 



LABLE 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from The Labour 
Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. These figures are the result of a 
monthly survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the purpose of providing esti- 
mates of the labour force characteristics of the civilian non-institutional population of working age. 
(More than 35,000 households chosen by area sampling methods in approximately 170 different areas in 
Canada are visited each month.) The civilian labour force is that portion of the civilian non-institutional 
population 14 years of age and over that was employed or unemployed during the survey week. 



200 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



Industrial and Geographic Distribution 

of Union Membership in Canada, 1962 

Survey of individual union locals provides breakdown of union membership in 
Canada— almost million and half — by industry, province, labour market area 



Union membership in Canada at the 
beginning of 1962 totalled 1,423,000, 
according to survey returns received by 
the Economics and Research Branch of 
the Department of Labour directly from 
national and international union head- 
quarters, central labour congresses, and 
independent local organizations. 

The data obtained from the survey were 
published in the 1962 edition of Labour 
Organizations in Canada, a handbook that 
contains statistical tables on union member- 
ship and a comprehensive directory of 
labour organizations with names of their 
principal officers and publications, and the 
distribution of their locals. The statistical 
data contained in the handbook are Canada- 
wide totals broken down by congress affilia- 
tion and type and size of union. 

The tables on the following pages supple- 
ment the information included in Labour 
Organizations in Canada by showing the 
distribution of union membership in Canada 
by industry, province and labour market 
area. The tables are based on information 
obtained in a separate survey directed, at 
the beginning of the year, to individual 
local, unions across the country. In this 
survey, each local union was requested to 
report the total number of its members, 
and the industry and location in which 
all or most of them were employed. 

Table 1 gives a distribution of union 
membership by industry on the basis of 
the, revised DBS Standard Industrial Classi- 
fication (1960). On the following page a 
companion table, numbered 1A, is included 
to show the industry breakdown in terms 
of the earlier Standard Industrial Classifica- 
tion (1948), which was used for union 
membership data in previous years. The 
need for a revision of the industrial classifi- 
cation arose out of the establishment of 
new industries, technological developments, 
the introduction of new materials, and the 
consequent effect of these changes on the 
relationships within and between industries. 

The data in Tables 1 and 1A are shown 
for the most part on the "major group" 
level. In instances were more detail could 
usefully be provided, care was taken to 
adhere to combinations of recognized indus- 
trial subgroups. For the railway industry, 



which is not further subdivided in the 
standard classification, subtotals are pro- 
vided to show the division of membership 
between the operating and non-operating 
sectors. 

Included as a supplement to the first 
table, Table 2 shows in alphabetical order 
the names of international and national 
unions or independent local organizations 
that account for more than one tenth of 
the union membership within the industry 
groups. The table thus does not necessarily 
show all organizations active within any 
particular industry group, but only those 
having more than 10 per cent of the 
organized workers in the group. 

In Table 3 union membership in Canada 
is broken down by province, and Table 4 
shows its distribution by labour market 
area. The boundaries of the labour market 
areas dealt with in Table 4 are broader 
than those of the centres for which the 
areas are named. In general, a labour 
market area corresponds to the area served 
by a local office of the National Employ- 
ment Service. In some cases labour market 
areas consist of two or more NES local 
office areas. These composite areas are 
identified by an asterisk and the local office 
areas they comprise are listed in the 
Appendix to Table 4. 

Locals accounting for almost 7 per cent 
of the membership total indicated that their 
members were dispersed throughout several 
locations in different areas or provinces. 
Since these locals and their membership 
could not be allocated to any one area or 
province, they have been classified to "two 
or more provinces" or "two or more areas" 
in Tables 3 and 4. 

The 1962 membership total of 1,423,000 
was approximately 24,000 lower than in 
the previous year. Much of the decrease 
was accounted for by the dissolution of 
the Newfoundland Brotherhood of Woods 
Workers, which had reported nearly 15,000 
members before it went out of existence 
in October 1961. 

At the beginning of 1962 nearly 7,000 
union locals were active in Canada, and 
although the survey met with a generally 
excellent response, not all of the locals 
supplied the required data. The number of 



The information for this article was obtained by the Collective Bargaining Section of 
the Economics and Research Branch from local union secretaries, whose co-operation is 
gratefully acknowledged. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



201 



locals from which no information was on 
hand appears in Tables 1 and 3. The 
corresponding entry for these locals in the 
membership column in Tables 1 and 3 repre- 
sents the difference between the Canada- 
wide membership total based on the survey 
of union headquarters mentioned earlier and 
the membership reported by the responding 
locals. 



The uneven quality of the basic source 
data and the practical difficulties inherent 
in the processing of the returns necessarily 
reduce the accuracy of the results. The 
statistics presented here, therefore, indicate 
only in a broad and approximate way the 
industrial and geographic distribution of 
organized labour in Canada. 



TABLE 1— UNION MEMBERSHIP BY INDUSTRY, 1962 

Based on Standard Industrial Classification (1960) 



Industry 



Locals 



Membership 



Forestry* 

Fishing and Trapping. 



Mines 

Metals 

Mineral fuels. 
Non-metal... 
Quarries 



Manufacturing. 

Food 



Tobacco products 

Rubber 

Leather 

Textiles 

Knitting mills 

Clothing 

Wood 

Furniture and fixtures 

Paper 

Printing and publishing 

Primary metals 

Metal fabricating 

Machinery 

Transportation equipment 

Electrical products 

Non-metallic mineral products. 
Petroleum and coal products. . . 

Chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing. . . 



Construction. 



Transportation and Utilities 

Air transport and incidental services 

Water transport and incidental services. 

Railway transport 

Running Trades , 

Non-operating employees 

Truck transport 

Buses and streetcars 

Other transport , 

Storage 

Communication 

Power, gas and water 



Trade. 



Finance. 



Service Industries 

Education 

Health and Welfare... 
Recreational service. . . 
Services to business. . . 

Personal services 

Miscellaneous services. 



Public Administration 

Federal administration. . . 
Provincial administration. 
Local administration 



Industry not reported. 
No return 



23 



163 

90 

40 

24 

9 

2,235 

281 

63 

13 

29 

53 

115 

22 

100 

83 

55 

300 

189 

112 

209 

100 

123 

109 

117 

24 

87 

51 

520 

2,069 

64 

74 

1,091 

339 

752 

38 

53 

11 

20 

600 

118 

164 



458 
107 
128 

98 

7 

106 

12 

553 

37 

74 

442 

21 

767 



32,400 
4,100 

50,000 

32,400 

10,600 

6,700 

300 

580,700 

63,200 
10,100 

5,400 
10,900 

9,800 
30,700 

3,200 
44,100 
24,500 

9,100 
74,400 
28,100 
62,200 
31,900 
17,500 
70,300 
42,400 
17,700 

4,500 
14,700 

6,000 

143,800 

329,000 

6,500 
36,700 
140,500 
35,800 
105,200 
21,000 
17,800 
2,200 
4,700 
65,700 
33,900 

41,700 



100,800 

9,000 

43,400 

23,100 

400 

22,500 

2,400 

85,000 

3,400 
25,100 
56,500 

10,200 

44,700 



Totals 



6,989 



1,422,800 



"■Includes some sawmilling. 



202 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1963 



TABLE 1A— UNION MEMBERSHIP BY INDUSTRY, 1962 

Based on Standard Industrial Classification (1948) 



Industry- 



Locals 



Membership 



Logging* 

Fishing 

Mining 

Metal 

Fuels 

Non-metal 

Quarrying 

Manufacturing 

Food 

Beverages 

Tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Textile products 

Clothing 

Wood products 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Iron and steel products 

Transportation equipment 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Miscellaneous industries 

Construction 

Transportation, Storage, Communication 

Air transport and airports 

Railways 

Running Trades 

Non-operating employees 

Buses and streetcars 

Water transport and incidental services. . 

Other transport 

Storage 

Communication 

Public Utilities 

Trade. 

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 

Service 

Community or public service 

Government service 

Recreation service 

Business service 

Personal service 

Industry not reported 

No return 

Totals 



23 



171 

92 
41 
24 
14 

2,222 

264 

61 

13 

28 

53 

114 

122 

133 

297 

191 

379 

136 

67 

104 

113 

27 

83 

37 

520 

1,510 

64 

1,092 

339 

753 

53 

80 

42 

18 

161 

118 

173 

8 

1,448 

234 

1,006 

83 

16 

109 

21 

767 



32,400 
4,100 

54,900 

36,600 

11,100 

6,700 

500 

566,900 

51,900 
10,500 

5,400 
10,300 

9,800 
31,100 
47,000 
33,100 
74,100 
28,300 
86,200 
71,000 
28,700 
40,000 
16,600 

4,700 
13,500 

4,700 

143,800 

274,300 

6,500 

145,100 

35,300 

109,800 

17,800 

38,100 

21,700 

4,300 

40,800 

33,900 

51,500 

400 

205,700 

52,100 
108,300 
20,200 
1,200 
23,900 

10,200 

44,700 



1,422,800 



"Includes some sawmilling. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



203 



TABLE 2— UNION REPRESENTATION WITHIN INDUSTRY GROUPS, 1962 

Industry Group Unions Comprising More Than 10 Per Cent 

of the Total Reported Membership 

in Industry Group 

(in Alphabetical Order) 

Forestry Bush Workers, Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fishing and Trapping Native Brotherhood of B.C. (Ind.) 

United Fishermen (Ind.) 

Mines 

Metal Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Ind.) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Mineral fuels Mine Workers (Ind.) 

Non-metal Mining Employees' Federation (CNTU) 

Quarries Cement Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

National Council of Canadian Labour (Ind.) 
Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manufacturing 

Food Bakery Workers (CLC) 

Packinghouse Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Retail, Wholesale Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Teamsters (Ind.) 

Beverages Brewery Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CLC-chartered locals 

Distillery Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Tobacco products Tobacco Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rubber Rubber Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Leather Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Leather and Plastic Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Leather and Shoe Workers' Federation (CNTU) 
Packinghouse Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Textiles Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Textile Workers' Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
United Textile Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Knitting mills National Council of Canadian Labour (Ind.) 

Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Textile Workers' Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Clothing Amalgamated Clothing Workers (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 
Ladies Garment Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Wood Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Furniture and fixtures Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Upholsterers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers Federation (CNTU) 

Paper Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp and Paper Mill Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Pulp and Paper Workers' Federation (CNTU) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Printing and pubhshing Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lithographers (Ind.) 
Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Typographical Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Primary metals Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Ind.) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Metal fabricating Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinery Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Transportation equipment Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Electrical products I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Electric Employees (Ind.) 
U.E. (Ind.) 

Non-metallic mineral products Cement Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Glass and Ceramic Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Petroleum and coal products Oil Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chemical products Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNTU-chartered locals 

Oil Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

204 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



TABLE 2-REPRESENTATION WITHIN INDUSTRY GROUPS. 1962— Concluded 

Industry Group Unions Comprising More Than 10 Per Cent 

of the Total Reported Membership 

in Industry Group 

(in Alphabetical Order) 

Miscellaneous manufacturing Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Construction Building Workers' Federation (CNTU) 

Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Labourers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Plumbers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Transportation and Utilities 

Air transport and incidental services Air Line Flight Attendants (CLC) 

Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 
Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
T.C.A. Sales Employees (Ind.) 

Water transport and incidental services LL.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Railway transport 

Running trades Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Non-operating employees Maintenance of Way (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Railway Carmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Railway, Transport and General Workers (CLC) 

Truck transport Teamsters (Ind.) 

Buses and streetcars Railway, Transport and General Workers (CLC) 

Street Railway Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Other transport Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Teamsters (Ind.) 

Storage Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Teamsters (Ind.) 

Communication Canadian Telephone Employees (Ind.) 

Letter Carriers (CLC) 
Postal Employees (CLC) 

Power, gas and water I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Service Employees (CLC) 

Trade Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Retail, Wholesale Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Finance Commerce Employees' Federation (CNTU) 

Service Industries 

Education CLC-chartered locals 

Municipal and School Employees Central Union 
(CNTU) 

Public Employees (CLC) 
Health and welfare Building Service Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Employees (CLC) 

Service Employees' Federation (CNTU) 
Recreational services Musicians (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Service Employees (CLC) 
Services to business Commercial Telegraphers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Office Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Personal services Hotel Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Railway, Transport and General Workers (CLC) 
Miscellaneous services Building Services Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNTU-chartered locals 

Office Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Teamsters (Ind.) 

Public Administration 

Federal administration CLC-chartered locals 

Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Plumbers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Provincial administration B.C. Government Employees (CLC) 

Saskatchewan Government Employees (Ind.) 

Local administration Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Employees (CLC) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



205 



TABLE 3— UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY PROVINCE, 1962 



Province 


Number 

of 
Locals 


Locals Reporting 


Number 


Membership 




109 

36 

337 

281 

1,661 

2,670 

307 

363 

401 

798 

9 

17 


99 

30 

300 

248 

1,375 

2,392 

286 

322 

365 

784 

5 

16 

767 


16,700 




1,800 




42,300 




26,000 




354, 100 




538,800 




64,400 




42,400 




60,400 




193,000 




600 




37,400 




44,900 








Totals 


6,989 


6,989 


1,422,800 







"Mainly Seafarers, Railroad Telegraphers, Commercial Telegraphers and Actors' Equity. 



TABLE 4r-UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY LABOUR MARKET AREA, 1962 



Labour Market Area 



Locals Membership Areas Having Under 1,000 Members 



Corner Brook 

Grand Falls 

St. John's 

Two or more areas. 



Newfoundland 

25 I 3,200 

18 2,500 

54 10,200 

1 | 500 



Charlottetown. 



Prince Edward Island 

I 25 | 1,500 | Summerside 



Amherst 

Halifax 

Kentville 

New Glasgow 

Sydney 

Truro 

Two or more areas. 



Bathurst 

Campbellton. 
Edmundston. 
Fredericton.. 

Moncton 

Newcastle 

Saint John 



Asbestos 

Beauharnois 

Buckingham 

Drummondville 

Farnham — Granby* 

Gaspe* 

Hull* (included with Ottawa, Ont. 

Joliette 

La Tuque 

Lac St. Jean* 

Lachute— Ste. Therese* 

Montmagny 

Montreal* 

Quebec — Levis* 

Quebec North Shore* 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup 

Rouyn — Val d'Or* 

St. fiyacinthe 

St. Jean 

Ste. Agathe — St. Jerome* 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke* , 

Sorel 



Nova Scotia 


14 


1,200 


90 


16,300 


23 


1,400 


41 


5,000 


78 


14,800 


19 


1,000 


1 


100 


ew Brun 


swick 


20 


2.100 


20 


2,200 


19 


1,600 


25 


1,200 


52 


5,900 


7 


1,100 


81 


10,100 


Quebe 


C 


5 


1,500 


9 


1,200 


11 


1,300 


24 


3.900 


44 


5,600 


8 


1,400 


33 


3,400 


10 


1,400 


91 


13,300 


12 


2,300 


8 


1,200 


491 


196,400 


158 


32,100 


32 


8,500 


15 


1,600 


18 


1,400 


29 


3,700 


26 


4,500 


24 


3,300 


17 


2,300 


32 


5,700 


77 


12,600 


17 


3,000 



Bridgewater, Inverness, 
Springhill, Yarmouth 



Liverpool, 



Minto, St. Stephen, Sussex, Woodstock 



Maniwaki, Mont Laurier 



206 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



TABLE 4— UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY LABOUR MARKET AREA, 1963— Continued 



Labour Market Area 



Locals Membership 



Areas Having Under 1,000 Members 



< 


Quebec— C 

25 
55 

20 
28 
12 

Ontari 

19 
53 
18 
51 
19 
21 
16 
33 
17 

115 
48 
47 

150 
12 
29 
40 
61 
99 

174 
42 
46 

133 
16 
26 
50 
42 
37 
48 
18 
36 
68 
65 

492 
82 
25 
15 

Manitol 

33 

12 

12 

213 

1 

Saskatche 

39 
17 
34 
77 
86 
29 
3 

Albert 

11 
112 
137 

35 

26 
2 


ont'd. 

4,000 




9,600 


Valleyfield 


2,900 




3,200 




14,600 






1,600 




6,200 




1,900 




7,100 




2,500 




2,400 




1,200 




5,000 




1,600 




24,400 




4,600 


Guelph 


5,300 




44,200 




5,100 




3,100 




6,500 




12,100 




20,300 




28,900 




5,000 




17,200 




25,400 




1,400 




2,300 




7,100 




3,100 




6,800 




10,800 


Smiths Falls 


1,400 




2,400 




28,800 




6,400 




171,800 




26,900 




3,600 




28,600 




t>a 

1,800 




2,800 


The Pas 


3,700 




54,800 




700 




wan 

4,300 




1,700 




3,400 




12,600 




11,000 




2,300 




4,600 




a 

1,500 




23,200 




27,900 




2,800 


Medicine Hat 


2,400 




2,100 



Arnprior, Bracebridge, Carleton Place, 
Collingwood, Gananoque, Goderich, 
Hawkesbury, Leamington, Lindsay, 
Listowel. Midland, Napanee, Orillia, 
Parry Sound, Perth, Picton, Prescott, 
Renfrew, Simcoe, Sioux Lookout, 
Sturgeon Falls, Walkerton, Wallace- 
burg. 



Dauphin, Portage la Prairie 



Estevan, Lloydminster, Swift Current, 
Weyburn 



Drumheller, Edson, Red Deer 



British Columbia 





62 
27 
34 

8 
57 
32 
33 
41 
364 
91 

4 


14,400 
4,000 
2,600 
1,700 
6,900 
3,800 
3,600 
6,000 
128,000 

14,500 
5,500 


Chilliwack, Dawsoi 
Quesnel 












Kitimat 












Prince Rupert 




Trail— Nelson* 




Vancouver — New Westminster* 




Victoria 




Two or more areas 









*Indicates labour market area comprising two or more NES local office areas. See Appendix. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



207 



APPENDIX TO TABLE 4 
LABOUR MARKET AREAS COMPRISING TWO OR MORE LOCAL OFFICE AREAS 

Labour market areas appear in bold type, followed by names of the component NES local 
office areas in light type. 

Quebec 

Farnham-Granby: Cowansville, Farnham, Granby. Gaspe: Causapscal, Chandler, Gaspe, Matane, 
New Richmond. Lac St. Jean: Chicoutimi, Dolbeau, Jonquiere, Port Alfred, Roberval, Ville 
d'Alma. Lachute-Ste Therese: Lachute, Ste Therese. Montreal: Montreal, Ste Anne de Bellevue. 
Quebec-Levis: Levis, Quebec. Quebec North Shore: Baie Comeau, Forestville, La Malbaie, Sept 
lies. Rouyn-Val d'Or: Rouyn, Val d'Or. Ste Agathe-St Jerome: Ste Agathe, St Jerome. Sherbrooke: 
Magog, Sherbrooke. Thetford-Megantic-St Georges: Megantic, Thetford Mines, Ville St Georges. 
Trois Rivieres: Louiseville, Trois Rivieres. 

Ontario 

Belleville-Trenton: Belleville, Trenton. Fort William-Port Arthur: Fort William, Port Arthur. 
Niagara Peninsula: Fort Erie, Niagara Falls, Port Colborne, St. Catharines, Welland. Ottawa-Hull: 
Hull, Que., Ottawa, Ont. Sudbury: Elliot Lake, Sudbury. Timmins-Kirkland Lake: Kirkland Lake, 
Timmins. Toronto: Long Branch, Newmarket, Oakville, Toronto, Weston. Woodstock-Tillsonburg: 
Tillsonburg, Woodstock. 

British Columbia 

Central Vancouver Island: Courtenay, Duncan, Nanaimo, Port Alberni. Okanagan Valley: 
Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon. Trail-Nelson: Nelson, Trail. Vancouver-New Westminster: Mission 
City, New Westminster, Vancouver. 



National Advisory Committee 

on Technological Education 

Second meeting agrees that graduates of institutes of technology will be more 
in demand than graduates of any other type of institution, adopts series of 
recommendations on problems of education after high school, before university 



That graduates of institutes of technology 
would be more in demand than graduates of 
any other type of institution was the con- 
sensus of the second meeting of the National 
Advisory Committee on Technological 
Education, in Ottawa on January 22 and 
23. 

The Committee, consisting of representa- 
tives of management, labour, provincial 
departments of education, institutes of 
technology and national associations con- 
cerned with technological education, advises 
the National Technical and Vocational 
Training Advisory Council and the Minister 
of Labour on all matters related to tech- 
nological education in Canada. This Com- 
mittee was constituted in 1961 as a sub- 
committee of the Council (L.G. 1961, p. 
550). 

The meeting adopted a series of recom- 
mendations and suggestions on the problems 
of education at the institute of technology 
level — the area between secondary school 
and university. 

Chairman of the meeting was Dr. Garnet 
Page, General Secretary, Engineering Insti- 
tute of Canada. 



The Committee: 

— Recommended a specific and compre- 
hensive achievement level for institute of 
technology and equivalent education, divid- 
ing all fields into two broad areas — applied 
science or technology, and fields other than 
applied science or technology. 

— Recommended that the achievement 
level of graduates be accompanied by an 
interprovincially recognized designation. 

— Appointed a three-man subcommittee 
to study further the important problems of 
interprovincial standards, designations and 
certification, the subcommittee to report to 
the Committee's next meeting. 

— Recommended that the federal Govern- 
ment, starting this year, sponsor and sup- 
port an annual conference of principals or 
administrators of institutes of technology. 

— Suggested that symposia be held as 
regular meetings, at which papers on tech- 
nological education would be presented by 
teachers and others associated with institutes 
of technology and other institutions giving 
post-secondary school education. 



208 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



— Recommended that the federal Govern- 
ment consider the establishment of a 
research and liaison service in the field of 
information on technological education. 

— Concluded that there was a need for 
more technological education in primary 
industries. 

— Recommended that a teacher in an 
institute of technology or similar institution 
have, as a minimum, a bachelor's degree or 
the equivalent, and two years of appro- 
priately related experience in a pertinent 
field, together with a minimum of three 
months teacher training. 

— Recommended the encouragement by 
the Government of in-service training 
schemes. 

— Unanimously recorded the opinion that 
courses in the institutes of technology not 
be oriented toward university credits. 

— Recommended that research be under- 
taken on the adaptation of high school 
curricula to, or their correlation with, the 
curricula of institutes of technology to 
provide for articulation between the high 
schools and such institutes. 

The Committee received a report on the 
present status of technological education 
in Canada, prepared by G. F. Vail, Tech- 
nical and Vocational Training Branch, and 
one presented by Dr. G. Fred McNally, 
Chairman of the National Technical and 
Vocational Training Advisory Council and 
former Chancellor of the University of 
Alberta, dealing with technological educa- 
tion in the primary industries, especially 
agriculture and fisheries. 

Another report, by the Information 
Branch of the Department of Labour, out- 
lined its promotion of education generally 
and technical and vocational education in 
particular. A further report outlined the 
progress in the certification of technicians 
and technologists as carried out by profes- 
sional engineering groups. 

The Committee was also apprised of the 
progress in the preparation by the Economics 
and Research Branch of a comprehensive 
occupational brochure outlining the work 
of technicians in various industries. 

Minister of Labour 

"The task of manpower development is 
one of the most crucial facing Canada 
today," said Hon. Michael Starr, Minister 
of Labour. He called upon the committee 
members to direct their attention to the 
development of national standards that 
would be recognized in all parts of Canada. 



Referring to the need to provide the 
quality and types of technical education 
required by the Canadian economy now and 
in the future, Mr. Starr said that the Depart- 
ment of Labour would depend on the 
knowledge and judgment of Committee 
members to help give direction in this task. 

Deputy Minister of Labour 

In his comments to the Committee, 
George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister of 
Labour, stated that the Committee faced 
two major problems — the need to develop 
common standards of training for tech- 
nicians in Canada and the need to develop 
uniform certification for those persons who 
receive this type of training. 

The Deputy Minister noted that since 
May 1961, enrolments in institutes of tech- 
nology have increased by nearly 2,500 
students, from 9,441 to 11,880. 

Stating that there is no question about 
the growing need for technician training, 
Mr. Haythorne said that more research was 
required in the development of curricula 
and asked that the Committee give this 
matter its attention. 

C.R. Ford 

C. R. Ford, Director, Technical and 
Vocational Training Branch, stressed that 
the technological education program should 
be an interprovincial one. "We cannot have 
40 different standards," he pointed out, 
referring to the 40 institutes of technology 
that would be in operation in Canada. 

Mr. Ford emphasized that he did not 
mean "uniform" training in all the provinces, 
but that the standard should be the same. 
He predicted that the countries in the 
European Common Market would even- 
tually have a common training standard. 

As he had on other occasions, he stressed 
that the objective in technological educa- 
tion, as in other programs of manpower 
development, should be to train the labour 
force of Canada as a whole, and not to view 
it as a program by itself. 

Status of Technological Education 

In his report on the present status of 
technological education in Canada, G. F. 
Vail of the Technical and Vocational 
Training Branch said: 

At the close of 1962 there were approxi- 
mately 12,000 full-time students undergoing 
training in one- to four-year post-high-school 
technical courses across Canada. This con- 
stituted a 4.1-per-cent increase over 1961, as 
compared with increases of 18.9 and 13.4 per 
cent for the years 1961 and 1960 respectively. 
Approximately one quarter of this number, or 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



209 



some 3,000, should graduate in 1963. About 
80 per cent, or 2,400 of these, may be said to 
have received the minimum of 2,400 hours 
recognized by this Committee as the desirable 
minimum for technician status. 

Mr. Vail reported further that there were 
31 institutions providing post-high-school 
technical courses in Canada. Ten of these 
operated almost exclusively in the field of 
post-secondary technical education, and 18 
provided extensive programs in trades and 
other occupational training along with their 
post-secondary technical courses. The 
remaining three provided a small number 
of post-secondary courses in addition to 
vocational high school programs. 

Research on curricula and training facili- 
ties, especially training equipment, was an 
urgent requirement in Canada, he said. 
Because of the "persistence of technological 
change," technological curricula should be 
constantly improved. 

Mr. Vail decried salary schedules for 
instructors and principals in technical 
institutes that were in many cases such "that 
a lasting detrimental effect threatens to 
result." An improperly qualified principal, 
obtained through a low salary schedule, 
"can have a profound effect on the efforts 
of all associated with an institution." 

He recommended that more consideration 
be given to the "ways and means of stimu- 
lating the professional growth and vitaliza- 
tion of instructors" in the field of tech- 
nological education, and that uniformity of 
standards and standard terminology be given 
urgent interprovincial attention. 

Definition of "Technician" 

The Committee discussed at length the 
problem of obtaining a satisfactory defini- 
tion of "technician," one that would be 
generally acceptable, that would include or 
indicate the level of achievement, and would 
at the same time be readily understood by 
the public. As currently used, the term 
"technician" often has little meaning, mem- 
bers asserted. 

Mr. Ford reiterated that the important 
thing was to "identify the qualification" 
first; the name — technician or any other — 
could be added later. He said a qualification 
should be identified by the amount and type 
of training required. The Committee's only 
concern, he said, should be with the level 
of competence by which a person is 
identified. 

Dr. Page, the Chairman, remarked that 
needs had to be defined before courses could 



be prepared. J. P. Francis, Director of the 
Economics and Research Branch, said cer- 
tain conditions, such as qualifications, would 
have to be determined before valid figures 
could be obtained or surveys conducted to 
determine present and future requirements 
of technicians. 

It was pointed out that the 2,400 hours 
of training beyond high school that had 
been considered the minimum qualification 
for a technician applied to all industries, 
including business. Not only the duration 
but also the pertinence of training was 
important. 

The Committee agreed that there seemed 
to be no accepted difference between the 
terms "technician" and "technologist" but 
that the "chap in the middle" — between 
skilled tradesman and professional engineer 
—would be in the greatest demand of any 
type of trained person. 

After receiving the reports of two ad hoc 
committees established to define "tech- 
nician," the Committee recommended 
definition of the level of achievement 
required, which definition should indicate 
graduation from an institute of technology 
or its equivalent. 

The program of education required to 
reach the suggested achievement, the Com- 
mittee said, should cover two areas: applied 
science or technology, and fields other than 
applied science or technology. In the first, 
the program should be other than that 
designed for university credits, should be in 
appropriate disciplines beyond the junior 
matriculation level, be based on mathe- 
matics, science and a language, and should 
have a minimum duration of 2,400 hours of 
instruction. In the second, the program 
should have the same requirements except 
that the curricula should be based on the 
skills and knowledge of the occupation con- 
cerned. 

Such programs should be designed in co- 
operation with industry and business so 
that they can at all times meet the full 
requirements of industry, and graduates 
should be identified by an interprovincially 
acceptable designation. 

A subcommittee was named to study the 
question of interprovincially acceptable 
standards. It was instructed to report at 
the Committee's next meeting. 

W. L. Allison of the Occupational 
Analysis Section of the Department 
reported that a comprehensive bulletin on 
the work of technicians was ready for the 
printer. 



210 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



45th Annual Meeting of the 

Canadian Construction Association 

Reviews progress in joint labour-management meetings. Apprenticeship Training 
Committee urges industry to train more apprentices, expresses confidence that 
new training facilities will help provide industry with well-trained workers 



The 45th annual meeting of the Canadian 
Construction Association, held January 20- 
23 in Winnipeg and attended by some 1,000 
delegates and guests, reviewed the progress 
made in the CCA's joint labour-manage- 
ment meetings conducted during the past 
year. Reports were presented by the chair- 
men of the Association's 13 standing com- 
mittees, including the Labour Relations and 
Apprenticeship Training Committees. 

Delegates were urged to train more 
apprentices, a proposal that was given more 
emphasis by a suggestion that contractors 
be assessed by the federal Government to 
support apprenticeship training programs. 
(A similar suggestion has been made in 
Britain — see page 238.) The meeting ex- 
pressed confidence that the new training 
facilities being established under the federal- 
provincial scheme would be able to meet 
the challenge of training to the industry's 
requirements. 

Among subjects put forward and dis- 
cussed was a suggestion that contractors 
be licensed. 

Papers presented at the meeting included 
one by Dr. J. F. Lehmann, National Pro- 
ductivity Council, Ottawa, on "The Applica- 
tion of Work Study Methods to On-Site 
Construction," Oliver Gaffney, Stratford, 
Ont., spoke on "Labour Classifications in 
Engineering Construction." 

The delegates elected T. A. Somerville 
of Toronto to succeed Hugh R. Mont- 
gomery of Montreal as President. 

President's Address 

In his presidential address to the meeting, 
Hugh R. Montgomery said it was necessary 
to stop the "balkanization" of Canada. He 
explained that he meant not only geo- 
graphical groupings or "the full recognition 
by all of us of the fact that in this country 
we have two of the world's finest cultures 
living side by side. I refer to something even 
more fundamental — the parochialism which 
1 am afraid exists right across this country. 
We see it only too clearly within our own 
industry — local preferences, a contentious 
subject, is a well-known symptom — but . . . 
it goes much further. 



"Who, outside the construction industry, 
knows or cares about our problems? Who, 
outside labour, knows or cares much about 
theirs?" 

He thought that at the root of the problem 
lies a failure in intercommunication. 

Asserting that taxation was a heavy bur- 
den on the industry, Mr. Montgomery said 
that today, all three levels of government 
absorb in taxation about 33 per cent of 
the Gross National Product compared with 
27 per cent 12 years ago. Although the 
social measures and facilities provided by 
this taxation could not be given up, he 
believed that some taxation incentives were 
necessary "to provide an attractive climate 
in which industry can expand." 

Substantial taxation and investment in- 
centives would encourage business to expand 
and, in turn, widen the tax base. The result 
could be lower tax rates, increased employ- 
ment with an attendant increase in the 
number of taxpayers, and reduced unem- 
ployment assistance expenses, he said. 

The construction industry would not 
achieve an output of $10,000,000,000 a 
year, for which it was currently geared, 
unless the Canadian economy once again 
started moving upward with our growing 
population, said the CCA President. 

Committee Reports 

Included in the year-end reports of the 
13 standing committees were those of the 
Labour Relations Committee and Appren- 
ticeship Training Committee. 

The Labour Relations Committee report 
expressed the belief that 1962 "may well 
prove to have been a turning point in 
construction labour relations across Canada." 
It stated that a small subcommittee held 
meetings of construction labour and man- 
agement at the national level. One of the 
developments of these joint meetings was a 
joint labour-management brief prepared for 
submission — on the day following the 
annual meeting — to the Government of 
Saskatchewan. 

This subcommittee has been meeting 
with one from the Association of Interna- 
tional Representatives of Building and Con- 
struction Trades since the 1962 CCA annual 
meeting in Montreal. Some 19 trades are 
represented on this body. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



211 



The Labour Relations Committee re- 
ported further progress "in exploring a 
number of new approaches to construction 
labour relations," and expected to expand 
these efforts in the future. Where necessary, 
these would be combined with new research 
projects. The Committee announced that 
the first such research project, of which the 
Association was a joint sponsor, was due 
for completion in early 1963, and should 
then be published in parts by the National 
Research Council. It also reviewed the 
agenda of its National Labour Relations 
Conference held in Ottawa on November 
5-7, 1962 (L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1333). 

The Apprenticeship Training Committee 
stated that the "welcome" effects of the 
Technical and Vocational Training Assist- 
ance Act started to be felt during 1962 
by the construction of 32 new trade 
schools ... It is expected that these 
facilities, especially the trade schools, will 
greatly help in providing the construction 
industry with well-trained, skilled young 
Canadians," the report said. 

The Committee gave details on inter- 
provincial examinations and standards, and 
quoted apprentice registration figures (see 
also L.G., Dec. 1962, p. 1340-41). It was 
not possible to make equitable comparisons 
of registrations between Quebec and the 
other provinces, because the Quebec appren- 
ticeship system required registration of all 
persons working in a construction trade who 
were not mechanics, the report pointed out. 
It deplored the fact, however, that "the 
majority of construction employers continue 
to fail to take full advantage of investing 
in the employment of apprentices," and 
urged all firms to accept as many indentured 
apprentices as possible. 

H. C. Nicholls of Toronto, who presented 
this report, said the industry should have 
twice as many workers apprenticed. He 
believed that one way to overcome this 
apathy would be to assess employer pay- 
rolls as an incentive for apprenticeship 
training. If employers had to pay for it, 
they would be more interested in such 
training and in obtaining its benefits. 

J. P. Cartier, Chairman of the CCA 
Apprenticeship Training Committee, also 
deplored the lack of interest by both man- 
agement and unions in this form of training. 
"A few of the construction trade unions . . . 
render little more than lip service to 
apprenticeship," he asserted. 



Discussions 

The convention heard a suggestion by 
Jacques Raymond, President of the Montreal 
Construction Association, that Canadian 
contractors be required to obtain licences 
attesting to their competency before under- 
taking a building project. Such licensing, on 
a nation-wide basis, would eliminate a small 
group of "undesirables," he said, adding that 
the Quebec Government now had before it 
a request for such legislation. 

Pre-qualification of contractors came in 
for much attention, and Brig. J. P. Carriere, 
Franki of Canada Ltd., Montreal, suggested 
a national authority to see that contractors 
are properly qualified. 

John L. Davies, President of the Royal 
Architectural Institute, of Canada, said the 
construction industry should increase its 
efficiency and oppose government intrusion 
into architecture and building. He criticized 
those general contractors who failed to 
co-ordinate and plan their jobs properly, 
and said contractors must support the im- 
provement of their personnel, especially 
those who will become superintendents. 

It was not good enough to place an 
ex-carpenter in charge of co-ordinating a 
big job without seeing to it that he had 
special training. The industry should also 
make certain that the new schools going 
up would provide skilled men for industry; 
sometimes technical-school instructors were 
teaching antiquated methods, Mr. Davies 
asserted. 

Resolutions 
Among the 25 resolutions adopted were 
those that: 

Proposed federal government incentives 

to increase winter-time construction and 
employment in the industrial and commer- 
cial fields, and that individual contractors 
and associations be urged to participate 
actively in the promotion campaign for 
winter construction. 

Requested immediate action by the 

federal and provincial Governments to 
revise their labour legislation on a con- 
tinuing basis. 

— Urged the federal Government to ex- 
tend sales tax exemption so as to include 
all construction materials and equipment. 



212 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 



Employment and Unemployment, February 



There was no appreciable change in 
either employment or unemployment be- 
tween January and February. In previous 
years employment has usually tended to 
decline and unemployment to rise during 
this period. 

In February, total employment was esti- 
mated to be 5,951,000 and unemployment 
545,000. 

Unemployment in February represented 
8.4 per cent of the labour force (in January, 
8.3 per cent), compared with 9.1 per cent 
in February 1962 and 11.3 per cent in 
February 1961. 

Both the estimated labour force and 
employment were higher in February than 
a year earlier, and unemployment was 
lower. The labour force was 73,000 higher, 
employment 111,000 higher, and unemploy- 
ment 38,000 lower. 

Employment 

Non-farm employment, at 5,419,000, was 
unchanged from January. In most previous 
years it has decreased slightly over this 
period, mainly as a result of seasonal slack- 
ening in construction and forestry. As usual, 
farm employment showed little change 
between January and February. 

Non-farm employment has held up better 
than usual this winter, largely because of 
continued strength in manufacturing and 
construction. In manufacturing, the improve- 
ment has been largely in durable goods 
industries, particularly motor vehicles, elec- 
trical apparatus and iron and steel. 

* See tables A-l to A-3, pages 254 and 255. 



In most regions, changes in employment 
between January and February were about 
in line with seasonal expectations; in On- 
tario, employment showed some evidence 
of strengthening. 

In February, non-farm employment show- 
ed an increase of 153,000, or 3 per cent, 
over a year earlier. The number employed 
on farms was estimated to be 42,000, or 
7 per cent, lower. 

Industry detail that is available for earlier 
months indicates the largest year-to-year 
gains to be in manufacturing and construc- 
tion. Forestry employment was lower than 
a year ago. In all other non-farm indus- 
tries, employment was either unchanged or 
slightly higher than in the previous year. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment remained virtually un- 
changed between January and February. In 
most previous years it has risen during this 
period. The February estimate of 545,000 
was 38,000 lower than that a year earlier, 
all of the decrease being among unemployed 
men. 

Of the total unemployed in February, 
473,000 were men; 274,000 were married 
men. Some 371,000, or more than two-thirds 
of the total, had been unemployed for three 
months or less. An estimated 118,000 had 
been seeking work from four to six months, 
and 56,000 for seven months or more. 

Unemployment rates were lower than last 
year in the Ontario and Atlantic regions; 
elsewhere, there was no significant change 
over the year. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Shortage 


Labour Market 
Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 


February 
1963 


February 
1962 


February 
1963 


February 
1962 


February 
1963 


February 
1962 


February 
1963 


February 
1962 


Metropolitan 


8 
15 

7 
39 


7 
17 

6 
38 


4 
11 

7 
17 


5 

9 
8 
19 


2 


1 


- 




Major Industrial 

Major Agricultural 

Minor 


- 






Total 


69 


68 


39 


41 


2 


1 


- 









THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



213 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-FEBRUARY 





SUBSTANTIAL 


MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 


— 


LABOUR 
SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




Calgary 


Halifax 








Edmonton 


Hamilton 








Montreal 


Ottawa-Hull 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Quebec-Levis 


Toronto 






(Labour force 75,000 or more) 


St. John's 
Vancouver-New 
Westminister 
Windsor 
Winnipeg 










Corner Brook 


->- BRANTFORD 








Cornwall 


Guelph 








Fort William-Port Arthur 


Kingston 
Kitchener 








Farnham-Granby 








Joliette 


London 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 
(labour force 25,000-75.000; 


Lac St. Jean 
Moncton 
New Glasgow 


Oshawa 
Saint John 
Sarnia 






60 per cent or more in non-agri- 


Niagara Peninsula 


Sudbury 






cultural activity) 


Peterborough 
Rouyn-Val d'Or 
Shawinigan 
Sherbrooke 
Sydney 
Trois Rivieres 


Timmins-Kirkland Lake 
Victoria 
















Charlottetown 


Barrie 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 


Lethbridge 
Prince Albert 


Brandon 
Chatham 






AREAS 


Riviere du Loup 


Moose Jaw 






(labour force 25,000-75.000; 40 


SASKATOON -£- 


North Battleford 






per cent or more agricultural) 


Thetford-Lac Megantic-Ville 

St. Georges 
Yorkton 


Red Deer 
Regina 








Bathurst 


Belleville -Trenton 


Kitimat 






Beauharnois 


Brampton 


->- STRATFORD 






Bracebridge 


Central Vancouver 








Bridgewater 


Island 








Campbellton 


Dawson Creek 








Chilliwack 


Drumheller 








Cranbrook 


Gait 








Dauphin 


Goderich 








Drummondville 


Kamloops 








Edmundston 


Listowel 








Fredericton 


North Bay 








Gaspe 


St. Hyacinthe 








Grand Falls 


St. Thomas 








Kentville 


Swift Current 








Lachute-Ste. 


Trail-Nelson 








Therese 


Walkerton 








Lindsay 


Weyburn 








Medicine Hat 


Woodstock-Tillsonburg 






MINOR AREAS 


Montmagny 








(labour force}! 0,000-25,000) 


Newcastle 
Okanagan Valley 
Owen Sound 


















Pembroke 










Portage la Prairie 










Prince George-Quesnel 










Prince Rupert 










Quebec North Shore 










Rimouski 










Ste. Agathe-St. Jerome 










St. Jean 










St. Stephen 










Sault Ste. Marie 










Simcoe 










Sorel 










Summerside 










Truro 










Valleyfield 










Victoriaville 










Woodstock, N.B. 










Yarmouth 








> The areas shown in capital let! 


ers are those that have been reel 


assified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 


moved. For an explanation of the c! 


assincation used, see facing page 




214 




THE LABOUR G 


AZETTE • MAR 


CH 1963 



Explanatory Note to "Classification of Labour Market Areas" 



The system of classifying the labour market 
situation in individual areas is an analytical 
device whose purpose is to give a clear and 
brief picture of local market conditions based 
on an appraisal of the situation in each area. 
In considering each category, it is necessary 
to keep in mind the marked seasonal fluctua- 
tions in labour requirements in Canada. Labour 
surpluses are consistently highest in each year 
from December to March and lowest from 
July to October. 

The criteria on which this classification system 
is based are as follows: — 

Group 1: Labour Surplus. Areas in which 
current or immediately prospective labour sup- 
ply exceeds demand in almost all of the major 
occupations. This situation usually exists when 
the ratio of registrations for employment on file 
at NES offices to paid workers, including those 
looking for jobs, is more than 10.0, 12.0 or 14.0 
per cent, depending on the size and character 
of the area. 

Group 2: Labour Surplus. Areas in which 
current or immediately prospective labour sup- 
ply exceeds demand in about half of the major 
occupations. The situation usually exists when 
the ratio of registrations for employment on file 
at NES offices to paid workers, including those 
looking for jobs, is more than 5.9 or 6.9 per 
cent, but less than 10.0, 12.0 or 14.0 per cent, 
depending on the size and character of the 
area. 

Group 3: Balanced Labour Supply. Areas 
in which current or immediately prospective 
labour demand and supply are approximately 
in balance for most of the major occupations. 
The situation usually exists when the ratio of 
registrations for employment on the file at NES 
offices to paid workers, including those looking 
for jobs, is more than 1.9 per cent or 2.4 per 
cent, but less than 6.0 or 7.0 per cent, depend- 
ing on the size and character of the area. 

Group 4: Labour Shortage. Areas in which 
current or immediately prospective labour de- 
mand exceeds supply in most of the major 
occupations. This situation usually exists when 
the ratio of registrations for employment on file 
at NES offices to paid workers, including those 
looking for jobs, is less than 2.0 or 2.5 per 
cent, depending on the size and character of 
the area. 

The classification of areas does not depend 
solely on the ratio of job registrations to paid 
workers. All areas, and particularly those in 
which the ratio is close to the limits of the 
above-mentioned ranges, are examined closely 
in the light of other kinds of information to 
see whether they should or should not be 
reclassified. Information on labour market con- 
ditions at local areas is obtained mainly from 
monthly reports submitted by each of the local 



offices of the National Employment Service. 
This information is supplemented by reports 
from field representatives of the Department 
of Labour who regularly interview businessmen 
about employment prospects in their companies, 
statistical reports from the Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics and relevant reports from other 
federal government departments, from provin- 
cial and municipal governments and from non- 
governmental sources. 

The term "labour market" as used in this 
section refers to a geographical area in which 
there is a concentration of industry to which 
most of the workers living in the area com- 
mute daily. The term is not meant to imply that 
labour is a commodity and subject to the 
same kind of demand and supply factors oper- 
ative in other markets. 

To facilitate analysis, all labour market areas 
considered in this review have been grouped 
into four different categories (metropolitan, 
major industrial, major agricultural, and minor) 
on the basis of the size of the labour force in 
each and the proportion of the labour force 
engaged in agriculture. This grouping is not 
meant to indicate the importance of an area 
to the national economy. The key to this group- 
ing is shown in the classification of labour 
market areas on page 214. 

The geographical boundaries of the labour 
market areas dealt with in this section do not 
coincide with those of the municipalities for 
which they are named. In general the boun- 
daries of these areas coincide with the district 
serviced by the respective local office or offices 
of the National Employment Service. In a 
number of cases, local office areas have been 
amalgamated and the names used include 
several other local office areas, as follows: 
Farnham-Granby includes Cowansville; Mont- 
real includes Ste. Anne de Bellevue; Lac St. 
Jean includes Chicoutimi, Dolbeau, Jonquiere, 
Port Alfred, Roberval and Alma; Gaspe in- 
cludes Causapscal, Chandler, Matane and New 
Richmond; Quebec North Shore includes La 
Malbaie, Forestville, Sept lies and Baie Co- 
meau; Sherbrooke includes Magog; Trois 
Rivieres includes Louiseville; Toronto includes 
Long Branch, Oakville, Weston and Newmar- 
ket; Sudbury includes Elliot Lake; Niagara 
Peninsula includes Welland, Niagara Falls, St. 
Catharines, Fort Erie and Port Colborne; Van- 
couver-New Westminster includes Mission City; 
Central Vancouver Island includes Courtenay, 
Duncan, Nanaimo and Port Alberni; and 
Okanagan Valley includes Kelowna, Penticton 
and Vernon. 

The 110 labour market areas covered in this 
analysis include 90 or 95 per cent of all paid 
workers in Canada. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1963 



215 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



Duration of Negotiations, 1962 



During 1962, 240 collective agreements 
covering bargaining units of 500 or more 
employees were signed in Canadian indus- 
tries excluding the construction sector. Of 
the 240 settlements, more than 60 per cent 
were reached within six months or less 
of bargaining, and 30 per cent were con- 
cluded in seven to twelve months. Eight 
per cent of the major negotiations extended 
beyond one year. 

Slightly more than one half of the 240 
major agreements were concluded without 
third-party assistance; the remainder were 
signed after conciliation or arbitration pro- 
ceedings. Of 117 settlements reached with 
assistance from third parties, 40 per cent 
were concluded at the conciliation officer 
stage, and about 18 per cent were reached 
as a result of conciliation board proceedings. 
Approximately one quarter of the negotia- 
tions requiring mediation went beyond the 
conciliation board phase; the employers 
and the unions resumed direct bargaining 
and settled without work stoppages. 

In British Columbia, an Industrial Inquiry 
Commission was appointed in a dispute 
between the Woodworkers and the 125 
logging and sawmill companies represented 
by Forest Industrial Relations Limited. 



Approximately 27,000 employees were 
covered by the ensuing settlement. 

Five major agreements in Ontario and 
Quebec were the result of final and binding 
arbitration. In Ontario, special legislation 
prohibited strike action against the Ontario 
Hydro Electric Power Commission and 
called for compulsory arbitration. Recourse 
to arbitration was made also in negotiations 
at Ottawa Civic Hospital. Contract negotia- 
tions between six hospitals in various cen- 
tres in Quebec and the Service Employees' 
Federation (CNTU), and between the Asso- 
ciated Clothing Manufacturers in Montreal 
and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers 
also were referred to arbitration. 

Five per cent of the major settlements 
in 1962 were reached after a work stoppage. 
Strikes preceded settlements at Campbell 
Chibougamau Mines, Canadian Celanese 
and Dominion Engineering in Quebec, and 
at Massey-Ferguson, Chrysler and the Royal 
York Hotel in Ontario. Other work stop- 
pages occurred at the Hamilton and Mont- 
real plants of Dominion Glass; in the fur 
industry in Montreal, Toronto and Win- 
nipeg; and in the long-distance trucking 
industry in Quebec and Ontario. 



NEGOTIATIONS PRECEDING SETTLEMENTS REACHED DURING 1962 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more employees concluded between January 1 and December 31, 1962, exclusive 
of agreements in the construction industry. 









Duration of Negotiations 


in Months 




Stage at Which 
Settled 


3 or les3 


4-6 


7-9 


10-12 


13 or over 


Total 




Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 




67 
8 
1 


118,210 
10,250 
27,000* 


36 

25 

6 

4 

1 
2 


39,840 

30,980 

9,450 

15,400 
5,500 
5,100 


15 
10 
12 

11 


14,360 

9,550 

129,780 

17,650 


3 
2 
1 

6 
1 
3 


4,010 
1,250 
2,500 

5.700 

550 

9,100 


2 
2 

1 

10 
3 
2 


2,200 

1.480 

680 

30,780 
11,450 

2,700 


123 
47 
21 

31 
5 
13 


178,620 


Conciliation officer 

Conciliation board 

Post-conciliation 


53,510 
169,410 

69,530 








17,500 








6 


8,180 


25,080 










Total 


76 


155,460 


74 


106,270 


54 


179,520 


16 


23,110 


20 


49,290 


240 


513,650 







* Industrial Inquiry Commission. 



This review is prepared by the Collective Bargaining Section, Labour-Management 
Division, of the Economics and Research Branch. 



216 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7963 



Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part